Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Primary Contact:
Cassie Maylor
cmmaylor@gmail.com

Amount Awarded:
 $500
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

We believe that art is essential to the activism surrounding sustainability movements and often functions as a catalyst for engagement. In our search for a band, we focused our efforts on finding local UW student ensembles. Supporting the sustainability of the arts on the UW campus was an important value that helped aided our selection. We also considered that finding the right group could could help establish a precedent for collaboration for future events like the SustainableUW Festival. From the groups we looked at, our committee has identified the UW’s Improvised Music Project as an outstanding student organization that upholds many of our values and goals.

The IMP is an RSO run by Jazz students. The group focuses on bringing together musicians seeking to both advance their artwork and education. The IMP gives students an opportunity to: collaborate with each other, perform their music at local venues, play in a variety of organized ensembles, and to learn from professionals brought in by the RSO.

 
Primary Contact:
Christian Laush
ecoreps@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $999
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Not only did Keraton attracted 8000 people last year but also had 13 vendors selling food. As a result, there is a substantial amount of waste produced. This year, Keraton is aiming to attract 10000 people. Surely, there will be more waste produced than last year. Therefore ISAUW will implement the ‘Keraton Going Green’ effort, which will ensure the reduction of waste production by vendors as well as the overseeing of waste sorting in the recycling and compost bins locations.

Primary Contact:
Kevin Masman
kevin.masman@gmail.com

Amount Awarded:
 $17,000
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:

Executive Summary

Our project will pair-up UW food waste with local non-profit agencies in need through the design of a website that would facilitate the logistics and transportation of food waste from UW Food Services without having so many food products go to compost. Over the course of two quarters, Irini Spyridakis and Madison Holbrook will lead a team of 15 undergraduate and masters students. The team will research, design, build, and implement a responsive website for UW HFS Dining facilities to connect with local non-profit organizations. 
The main education and outreach goal is to raise awareness and educate the UW community about food waste and recovery. This project will bolster the sustainable achievements of the UW and serve as a model that could be implemented outside the community. We hope to empower our team of students to see themselves as experienced food recovery ambassadors who will further sustainable practices in future education, jobs, and communities, exemplifying the motto, “each one, teach one.”

Primary Contact:
Irini Spyridakis
irinis@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $150,000
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:

Executive Summary

UW-Solar is a student-led organization working with architecture firm Perkins+Will to install building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) and rooftop photovoltaics (PV) on the new Life Sciences Building of the University of Washington Seattle campus. The intended installation will serve both as an ancillary source of electrical power and a heat gain control measure on the building envelope. The BIPV panels will also be highly visible and showcase UW as a steward in sustainable construction. The rooftop PV will generate substantial clean energy and reduce the building's carbon footprint.

 

 

Primary Contact:
Alexander Ratcliff
alexr529@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $25,000
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Cycle Pack is a bicycle library program that encourages bicycle ridership by providing long term bicycle rentals to UW students. Unlike bike share, which provide short term bicycle rentals between two hubs, and regular bike rentals, which facilitate daily or weekend use, a long term rental gives users an experience of bicycle ownership and the ability to commute by bicycle. The experience of ownership teaches users about the various ways a bicycle can fit into one’s everyday life as well as the responsibility that stems from maintaining and preventing bicycle theft. It is our view that providing an experience of bicycle ownership is the best way to demonstrate the value of a bicycle to a user and foster a desire to purchase a bicycle after completing the program. It is our goal to do more than just increase bicycle ridership on and to campus. We hope that providing this service will encourage sustainable cycling habits that persist into the rest of a user’s life.

Primary Contact:
Cole Laush
colelaush22@hotmail.com

Amount Awarded:
 $70,000
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:

Executive Summary

This project proposes the production of molded biodegradable pots to replace agricultural and horticultural plastic pots on campus. These pots will be made using switchgrass and brewer’s spent grain, both of which are readily available to the Paper and Bioproducts Center located in the basement of Bloedel Hall; a floor layout of this lab can be found attached to this proposal in Figure 2. The Paper and Bioresource Center focuses on conversion of raw bio-materials into pulp, paper, products, and fuels; making it a synergistic fit for this new sustainable molding technology. A current sustainability issue is resolved by fabricating these pots with up to 60% spent grains, preventing these grains entering landfill. Currently, a team of 5 Bioresource Science and Engineering (BSE) students has been established to begin production of these biodegradable pots, with the intent of creating a precedent of sustainable products on the UW campus. Our long-term goal is to provide the campus with sustainable alternatives to disposable plastics across campus organizations, research facilities, and classrooms wherever possible. 

Primary Contact:
Kaitlin Tighe
ktighe@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $43,603
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

UW Grounds Management and UW Facilities Construction (Facility Services) seeks $43,603.00 to obtain the necessary infrastructure to augment the salvage wood program which creates products from trees that are removed from the campus-wide landscape. By keeping the tree material on campus, money is saved in disposal cost, less energy is used in waste transportation, some of the asset value of the tree is retained by being incorporated into campus projects and the investment made into that tree over time is preserved, especially if the final product becomes a permanent feature on campus.

The University of Washington Seattle campus grounds management staff manages about 10,000 trees. At some point in time these trees will be removed as a result of natural decline or death, due to disease issues, as a preventative measure to avoid potential hazards, or as part of a construction/capital project. Grounds Management is charged with the task of protecting campus assets in the landscape. Campus trees are a significant asset in both actual value and investment over time. In 2008 the total annual benefits provided by tree on campus was valued at $736,385.00 and the total annual cost of those trees were $265,100.00. (Vale, Kava. 2011. University of Washington Seattle Campus Forest Resources Analysis. Master’s Project, University of Washington Botanic Gardens. Seattle Washington.) The net benefit in dollar value is then approximately half a million dollars, in which a portion is lost when a tree in cut up and removed from campus. Facilities Maintenance & Construction seeks to obtain and build infrastructure that increases the capacity and safety for staff to process tree material in ways that protect University assets and investments related to our campus trees. The salvage wood program is a collaborative partnership between Facility Services Grounds Management and Facilities Construction. The processed wood material will be used for student, faculty and administration projects, with opportunities available for the College of built Environments programs and the needs related to CPO& Facilities Construction projects.

As trees are removed from the campus landscape and are incorporated into campus-wide projects, the story of that tree (its narrative) will hopefully become part of the project narrative. Through education and outreach efforts, the perception of trees on campus and urban trees in general will change to reflect the understanding that they have value beyond their time in the ground. Outreach and education through partners in the College of Built Environments, School of Art, Art History, and Design, and the UW Botanical Garden and Arboretum will also create opportunities for telling the story of a tree beyond the day to day campus audience. From conference tables to outdoor structures, wood from campus trees one day could be found all throughout campus each with a story, a story of a tree that grew on campus and still lives there in a tangible way.

Learn more here.

Primary Contact:
Daniel Sorensen
dgs7@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $960
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The Tribal Water Security Colloquium (TWSC) was hosted by the Water is Life: water, health and “ecosystem services” class taught by Dr. Clarita Lefthand-Begay in the Department of American Indian Studies. Undergraduate students enrolled in this class collaborated by picking, inviting and hosting leaders to speak about water. In the TWSC we focused our attention on creating a space where we could learn directly from influential tribal leaders whose communities are at the forefront of climate change and environmental challenges. In addition, we made a strong effort to privilege the voices and experiences of these community members. Due to industrial pollution, storm water pollution, and colonization, tribal nations face varying levels of water insecurity which has implications to food security, and cultural integrity. Globally and nationally, tribal water security issues have not received the attention needed to ensure safe water for all tribal members in the United States. In the TWSC, we aimed to bring awareness to these issues and to provide an opportunity for our audiences to hear directly from leaders. In order to highlight these shortcomings, and to understand these issues as experienced by community members, we hosted this Colloquium.

The Colloquium was held on May 13, 2016 and included a line-up of speakers who presented about the implications of the coal terminal permit at Cherry Point, efforts to reclaiming sacred waters, altered waterways resultant of climate change, restoration efforts and the cultural significance of water to tribal culture. In these presentations we learned about the significance of self-determination to address water security needs and how communities are working to address these problems. There were also 6 student poster presentations about uranium contamination in water, Elwha Dam removal, the Gold King Mine spill, fish consumption rate debate in Washington state, tribal fishing rights and clean water home delivery. Over 70 people attended the event, which was well above our expectation. In addition, the conversations inspired our audience to consider the water issues occurring in North America and to consider ways to achieve tribal water security. If you are interested in keeping up with this event over the years, please visit our website.

Primary Contact:
Clarita Lefthand-Begay
clarita@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $10,521
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Our project is aimed at wastewater capture and reuse, from the reverse osmosis (R/O) unit in the BB-Wing of the medical sciences building. Through a series of storage tanks and pumps this wastewater will have a second use in the cooling tower located in the same room. Our project will reduce total water consumed in the building by repurposing a waste product as a usable resource.

In the larger picture this project represents a rather modest savings, however, reducing consumption of water lessens the impact on our overall water infrastructure and can be considered an adaptation strategy should the predicted impacts of climate change occur, including but not limited to reduced snow pack and water availability in the Pacific Northwest.

We are requesting $10,521 for this project. We predict this investment could be recouped in as little as 4-8 years. Based on measurements over the last two years this project may save between $1,250-$2,500 per year at the current water rate of $15 per hundred cubic feet (ccf). We hope this project can be a model for potential future projects in buildings with a similar setup. However, due to the structure of the University budgeting system we were not able to propose a loan or attempt to roll the savings into additional projects.

We have been working with Dennis Garberg, maintenance supervisor for the Health Sciences building zone, along with John Leaden, a retired facilities employee, and Michael Flanagan, Analyst for Finance and Business Services at Facilities Services. 

Primary Contact:
Duncan Clauson
clausd@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $67,967
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The SER-UW Native Plant Nursery is a student-run nursery established in 2013 that grows native species to provide a source of plants for restoration projects for the UW campus and UW students.  The nursery has spent the last year, with money from the CSF grant, expanding and building a new hoop house to house all of our plants.  Currently, we provide native plants to student-run restoration projects like Whitman Walk, Kincaid ravine, and UW restoration classes like ESRM 473.  We are working to also provide native species to UW Grounds Management to increase the native plants grown on campus.  We have two plant sales to the public per year—one in the Spring and one in the Fall—to reach out to the wider community. 

This next year, we are increasing our outreach efforts by writing curriculum about native plants and nurseries and teaching classes at our work parties and hosting evening classes that are open to both students and the public.  Through our classes, we hope to reach and help educate more people about the role native plant nurseries play in restoration.  We are also conducting a series of small experiments and researching to help write a management plan for the nursery that will build the foundation for running an efficient and effective native plant nursery that can provide plants to students and on-campus projects. Our goal is to be a sustainable source of native plants as well as provide education opportunities for our community and our campus.

Primary Contact:
Mary-Margaret Greene
mmgreene@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $8,120
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Project: Zimtervention will establish Zimride, an online ridesharing system, as a viable option to single-occupancy vehicle(SOV) trips to and from the UW campus. This will achieve goals of reducing campus-related carbon emissions and promoting sustainable behavior change.

The principle component of the project is to fund a new student position, Campus Rideshare Coordinator (CRC) to:
1) establish a critical mass of UW Zimride users; and
2) integrate UW Zimride into institutions and campus life

The CRC will work with Commuter Services during Spring 2011 and the 2011-2012 academic year, part-time at 10 hrs/week. This will fall under an undergraduate Student Assistant job classification, with hourly wages of $13 and ineligible for additional benefits.

This is the second phase of a graduate student project through the Program on the Environment’s Environmental Management Certificate (EMC). To date, UW Zimride has been introduced on campus with one of the most successful launches in program history, and the EMC students have begun implementation of a strategy for changing SOV behavior,relying on evidence-based principles of community-based social marketing and theories of sustainable behavior change.

Additional work is needed, however, to establish a critical mass of users and integrate Zimride into UW life as a trusted and well-known mode of transportation. As such, the role of the CRC will be to continue to implement and expand upon the community-based social marketing campaign. The CRC will also work to create institutional legacies, such as including Zimride into new student and staff orientation, promoting it for travel during academic breaks, and incorporating it into other Commuter Service programs. In short, the CRC will work to integrate UW Zimride into campus life.

Primary Contact:
Chris Hoffer
hofferc@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $34,635
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

This is a student initiated project to decrease the use of Seattle City water in the UW greenhouse for single pass irrigation purposes. Fertilized and clear irrigation water in the existing 14,000 sq ft greenhouse exceeds 127,000 gpy. Estimates of water use for the new greenhouse will be similar or greater than the current greenhouse.The design utilizes redirection of the new Life Sciences Lab building (LSB) RO/DI system reject water for use in the greenhouse plant irrigation system.The RO/DI reject water would otherwise pass directly to drain (20% of supply).The RO/DI system reject water was demonstrated to be acceptable for irrigation of the greenhouse plants; and therefore, suitable as a source to decrease demand from the greenhouse irrigation use.There are quite a number of lab buildings on the UW campuses with similar RO/DI systems which could have the reject water redirected for other purposes.

The greenhouse hosts thousands of K-12 students and their teachers annually for tours of the plant collections.Similarly, 40% of all UW incoming students pass through Biology courses and tour the greenhouse as part of their course work.Our intent is to include this water saving feature as part of the greenhouse tours to illustrate and encourage others to think of water conservation via multiple use approaches.  The project will involve continuing student involvement since tours are led by Biology undergraduate and graduate students who will explain the water reuse project during tours.The LSB media wall in the 1st floor lobby will also include illustrations and information on the sustainability features of the new building and greenhouse, and student input toward making the most impactful presentation will be very helpful.Similarly, the LSB design and construction team welcomes student involvement toward internship-like participation with professionals for design, construction, commissioning, and operation of the new system.  UW Urban Infrastructure Lab (UIL) and UW Civil and Environmental Engineering are interested in participation of their students as well as the UW College of Built Environments Integrated Design Lab (IDL).

Primary Contact:
Roert Goff
rwgoff5@uw.edu

UW Real Food Challenge
Amount Awarded:
 $2,000
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The UW Housing and Food Services (HFS) spends $8.5 million annually on food from 40 vendors. This is a huge fiscal sum that has a major impact on Washington State food economy, especially producer and process sectors. HFS currently lacks clear measurable definitions and standards to qualify “sustainable” and “local” food. When our RSO, Real Food Challenge (RFC), conducted a preliminary review of HFS purchases, we found ambiguity in definitions of local, when Coca Cola products were labeled locally based because processing plants are in King County. This audit will refine standards qualifying foods as local, ecologically sound, fair and humane, and will help clarify which specific food items HFS purchases really are local and sustainable. This will address another concern: lacking student awareness of the magnitude of the impact UW and HFS have on the food economy. Customers are not offered many transparent choices or sufficient information to eat locally or sustainably on campus.

The project purpose is to work with HFS long-term to improve food purchasing from sources that are locally based, ecologically sound, humane to animals, and fair to humans, in all points of the food value chain. Another objective is to increase student awareness of local sustainable food purchasing and options on campus. It is essential to include students in this process to improve student engagement with HFS staff and to help voice student opinion and strategize marketing of campus local sustainable food.

This project is the preliminary step to address these concerns. We will first conduct an audit of current HFS food purchases modeled after the Real Food Calculator, see realfoodchallenge.org/calculator. This audit will help identify which foods currently purchased are local and sustainable, and opportunities to improve. Creating this measure and producing a statistic of percent sustainable food at UW will give HFS and RFC a number for advertising and to improve upon in the future.

Primary Contact:
Samantha E Ryder
sameliza@uw.edu

UW Farm
Amount Awarded:
 $22,310
Funding Received:
 2013-2014
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The University of Washington Farm (UW), a registered student organization, would like to build a greenhouse at our Center for Urban Horticulture site on campus. The UW Farm is partnering with the University of Washington chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) to plan and implement this project. In order to build a greenhouse, the UW Farm will need to level the ground at the Center for Urban Horticulture site, run electricity to the greenhouse, and equip it with benches and supplies for spring and winter vegetable production. Additionally, the UW Farm plans to install heated benches for seedling growth.

The UW Farm is currently renting a small space at the Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH) greenhouse at a prohibitively high cost for only two months of the year. Building a greenhouse at the UW Farm will allow for a more flexible and productive planting plan, an extended growing season, and an overall increase in yearly production. A large portion of crops grown at the UW Farm is sold to Cultivate, the District Market and various other HFS locations. Extending the growing season with the greenhouse will allow the Farm to provide locally and sustainably grown produce to dining halls, restaurants and grocery stores on campus for a larger majority of the school year.

The EWB students will build the greenhouse from scratch. This will allow students to learn how to build a sustainable structure from the ground up, rather than putting together a pre-made kit.  The EWB students anticipate that it will be about $500 cheaper to build the greenhouse from scratch than using a kit. Additionally, the EWB students have decided to hire an engineer to run electricity to the greenhouse. The UW Farm will grade the site ourselves.

The student engineers and farm leaders will work in tandem, along with help from drop in volunteers and service learners, to build the greenhouse and develop a growing system. Each quarter, the UW Farm hosts between student service learners through the Carlson Center, farm leadership positions and the farm internship class.  Additionally, this grant will fund a greenhouse intern for a full growing season following the completion of the greenhouse. Professor Jennifer Ruesink, a biology professor at the UW, teaches the farm internship class on campus and has agreed to oversee the greenhouse intern. The EWB students are working under the advising of Professor Mark Benjamin, a professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington.

The UW Farm is requesting $22,310.00 to complete this project. The total cost did increase slightly from our original estimate however we were able to secure the tools for the greenhouse through other means.

Please see the chart below for a full breakdown of the costs. The total costs listed in the chart include an estimated ten percent sales tax and delivery fees. There will be no additional cost for utilities for the greenhouse or for the grading of the greenhouse site. 

Primary Contact:
Sarah Geurkink
sgeurk@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

This project will be to design and plant a hedgerow along the southern boundary of the UW-CUH Farm; it will be composed of woody perennial plant species that will act primarily as pollinator habitat, providing forage, shelter, and most importantly, overwintering habitat for insects. By installing suitable habitat for local pollinating insects, this project will both enhance the biodiversity of the surrounding Union Bay Natural Area and benefit student food production at the UW Farm by potentially increasing the yield of vegetables grown and the genetic diversity (stress-tolerance) of the crops. Habitats will also provide a home for other, non-pollinating species that will benefit the farm such as parasitic wasps or flies that kill pest insects.

UW students that work and volunteer at the farm will have the opportunity to help plant the vegetation over the coming year.  They will learn how to care for the habitats into future years: primarily trimming and maintenance of perennial shrubs, removing weeds that grow into the area, and planting replacement plants as necessary. Teens and young adults from Seattle Youth Garden Works will also be involved in the installation and future maintenance of the pollinator habitats. Any future work on the site will require minimal effort by volunteers; after the initial installation is completed the hedgerow will be self-sustaining.

Primary Contact:
Nicolette Neumann
nneumann@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $59,730
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Green Square: Where the Plants Are.

Through student-led innovation and design, the UW Tower Demonstration Garden team aspires to transform the Tower plaza by enhancing the appearance of the expansive red brick with an attractive oasis of green urban food production. The garden will demonstrate University of Washington's sustainability goals through an adaptive appropriation of urban space. With the traffic of visitors and staff at the UW Tower and in anticipation of the increased exposure from the adjacent link rail station, Green Square will represent the innovative mission of the University and the Campus Sustainability Fund to a broad audience.

Green Square will demonstrate the possibilities of urban food production and the co-benefits of greening underutilized urban spaces. The project will use design techniques to balance food production and aesthetics appropriate to the Tower environment while inspiring to the community to grow its own food. Similar in approach to parklets for streetscapes, Green Square will be a vibrant urban community space to relax in a refuge of planters, vertical green-screens, bench seating and gathering spaces. In addition to the ecological benefits that this project will produce (increased biodiversity, lowered urban heat island effect, improved water filtration, pollinator support, etc.), the garden will be an excellent model for the valuable role that intensive gardening can play in our community. The garden activities will not only offer educational volunteer opportunities for students and the local community, Green Square will also be a garden destination that can be organized to host attractive community events such as dinner gatherings, university ceremonies, garden parties, guest speakers, outdoor movies, and other innovative ideas.

Successful implementation of the Green Square Urban Garden Demonstration project will showcase the possibilities for environment-appropriate urban gardening, create an attractive community gathering space, highlight current garden design innovations, and exemplify the University of Washington’s dedication to sustainability.

Primary Contact:
Michael Lewis
michael@inkwellcollective.com

Amount Awarded:
 $9,051
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The Sustainable Stormwater Coordinator (SSC) position designates a SEFS research aide appointment to spread awareness about and physically improve stormwater treatment on campus. This is accomplished by investigating the current quantity and quality of campus stormwater, analyzing a suite of suitable water management tools, and building a collaborative student-faculty-administration approach to this pressing issue. In sum, continuation of this project seeks concrete and actionable runoff strategies, informed by water quality testing of discharges from parking lots, rooftops and sports fields.

Presently, the SSC has made significant progress in advancing the responsible handling of our fresh water resource at UW as each of the supported projects/endeavors has benefited from assistance with some or all of the following roles/responsibilities: funding identification, program development, design, materials acquisition, water quality testing, documentation, facilitation of permitting, facilitation of contracted consultations, site visits, and facilitation of administrative collaboration for multiple projects/endeavors.

Despite this progress in establishing a baseline of momentum, the importance of continuing the SSC position is urgent. Funding from other sources has not been secured and the potential discontinuation of this position would hamper progress and threaten follow-through on many of the projects listed above. The position has increased visibility and awareness of the CSF by connecting promising student led projects to the CSF. In so doing, a strong network of projects has an aggregate effect of success. These projects are all linked and supportive of one another, leading to a tight knit web of sustainability.

The SSC position is overseen by hydrology Professor Susan Bolton and the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. It consults with campus Environmental Engineer David Ogrodnik, Engineer James Morin, Landscape Architect Kristine Kenney, Environmental and Land Use Compliance Officer Jan Arntz, and Grounds Manager Howard Nakase.

$9105 is requested to continue the SSC position, water quality testing and analysis, and outreach and education through December 2015.

 
Primary Contact:
Matthew Schwartz
mateos@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The UW Center for Communication & Civic Engagement’s Rethinking Prosperity project organized the Next System Teach-In in partnership with the UW Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies. Rethinking Prosperity is an initiative that seeks to identify and communicate economic models that work for more people, within planetary boundaries. It emerged from a seminar of undergraduate seniors in Communication. The Teach-In took place on April 25th, 2016 at Kane Hall. Students, faculty, alumni and community partners were represented on the panels at the Next System Teach-In, which addressed the following critical questions among others: How can the economy be equitable and environmentally sustainable? What local solutions can become models in a global system? What would real democracy look like? The whole discussion was recorded graphically and will be shared with the campus community. The University of Washington Next System Teach-In is part of a nationwide call to action to increase collaboration among teachers, learners, and movements for systemic change.

The objectives of the Teach-In are to launch a campus conversation on how environmental goals can be achieved through an economic system with sustainability at its core and to build a learning community to create solutions and build support for an economic and political system that can restore compatibility with the environment. Through this event and the connections that follow, students and student groups, faculty, and community partners working on systems change for environmental outcomes will be able to more easily connect and build momentum and awareness.

.

Photo: Graphic Recording of the Teach-In Conversation

Primary Contact:
Caterina Rost
crost@uw.edu

Manastash Ridge Observatory website
Amount Awarded:
 $59,559
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Forty years after its dedication, it's time to make changes at the University’s Manastash Ridge Observatory (MRO) that reflect the realities of how we use the facility and respect our impact on natural resources, particularly our water and energy consumption. We propose to upgrade our bathrooms, kitchen, and lighting to conserve water and energy, and to build a rainwater catchment system and a solar energy system to reduce our reliance on outside water and power. The budget for this proposal is approximately $60,000, of which $49,000 is for the solar energy system.
MRO is a small observatory owned by the UW Astronomy department. Starting with the snow melt in the spring, and continuing until through mid-October, our undergraduate majors spend days learning how to use the thirty inch telescope and conducting independent research. Each summer about twenty students use the observatory and two classes of astro 101 students from Everett Community College enjoy an overnight field trip. Year round the Electrical Engineering Department’s Radar Remote Sensing Lab uses the facility remotely.

Built in 1972 on a ridge outside of Ellensburg, Washington, electrical and telephone utilities could be brought in, but it was far too remote for city water service. The standard bathroom and kitchen fixtures make us reliant on expensive water deliveries (~$800 each time). In addition each team brings up drinking water in jugs, so the delivered water is used almost entirely for flushing. We think it’s time to rebuild the observatories energy and water systems since the last forty years have seen the maturation of low-energy lighting and low-consumption water fixtures, as well the development of an industry focused on household solar power generation.

Our plan for conservation is to construct a kitchen that is not plumbed to running water, to replace the kitchen’s energy inefficient fridge and range as well as our original “maximum flush” toilets, and to install LED lighting for our working and living areas. In order to reduce the observatories overall environmental impact, and to demonstrate the possibilities for sustainable construction, we propose the construction of a rainwater catchment system and solar grid-tie system with battery reserve. The latter option could potentially make us the first observatory capable of solar-powered astronomical observations.

We project energy savings of $3000 per year, and during our busy summer season we project that the solar array could take the observatory entirely off the grid. The surplus energy we generate (approximately $200 worth) is sold back to the grid, savings we can return to the CSF. Updating our bathrooms and kitchen could completely replace the need for water deliveries, which would save $2400 per year and reduce CO2 emissions due to observatory operations by one ton annually.

Included in the budget are computer monitors to display and create awareness on campus of the sustainable energy equipment at MRO. Of course we will also compare ongoing electrical and water costs with previous years to quantify the system’s effectiveness.

Primary Contact:
Oliver Fraser
ojf@uw.edu

yeslerswamp.weebly.com
Amount Awarded:
 $65,000
Funding Received:
 2013-2014
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Update: This project is currently recruiting interns!

Our team is proposing a $65,000 construction project on the western shoreline of the Yesler Swamp lagoon to offer UW students and other visitors a unique wildlife observation platform.  The viewing platform will be called the “Yesler Swamp Trek Stop” (YSTS) and it will offer a permanent bird-watching post to rest, reflect, and interact with the different species that reside in wetland and swamp ecosystems around Lake Washington.  Our team has been hosting volunteer restoration events at the Yesler Swamp and documenting them on a website since October of 2013. (yeslerswamp.weebly.com)

The primary goals of this project are to:

  • Build a bird blind structure with an extremely low environmental footprint that adheres to green building specifications and communicates the importance of resource conservation.
  • Provide a unique and identifying landmark for the Yesler Swamp.
  • Provide an opportunity for the public to engage with the swamp and its biodiversity through interpretive signs (explaining the swamp ecosystem and services).
  • Provide an exceptional view of the swamp lagoon, Lake Washington and Mt. Rainier.
  • Provide an outdoor classroom for groups visiting the UW Center for Urban Horticulture.
  • Build a stronger connection between the Yesler Swamp and the well established Union Bay Natural Area (UBNA).
  • Raise awareness about the Yesler Swamp and the opportunities it presents for students and the greater Seattle community to actively engage with nature.
Primary Contact:
Tyler Licata
tlicata@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $2,000
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Labs account for over 20% of all space on campus. Nitrile lab gloves are a significant source of waste produced in labs across all departments. A recent waste audit concluded that gloves are the second largest source of waste in campus labs. UW Sustainability and UW Recycling propose a pilot program that would recycle used, non-hazardous nitrile lab gloves that are currently being sent to the landfill. The gloves would be collected then shipped back to their producer, Kimberly-Clark, where they would be recycled into products like park benches and chairs.

Primary Contact:
Dalena Huynh
dhuynh93@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $980
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Can't make it in to the bike shop? Now, the bike shop can make it to you. The Mobile Maintenance Trailer allows the student mechanics at the ASUW Bike Shop to traverse this majestic campus with all the tools necessary to provide safety-check and quick tune-up services for any UW cyclists they encounter, free of charge. Everything a rusty bicycle could ever want, including an assortment of professional shop tools and an array of greases, degreasers, and lubricants, will be kept conveniently in a Surly long-bed trailer. Affixed to a trusty mountain bike, the mobile maintenance trailer will be ready for quick deployment.

The director of the mobile maintenance program will be one of the ASUW bike shop's student mechanics, and will organize and lead the bike shop's efforts in offering these events. 

Primary Contact:
Kris Skotheim
krisos@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

This project attempts to assess the feasibility of the University of Washington switching to an organic fertilizing system. The efficacy of biosolids, compost, and compost tea will be compared to the 8,000 pounds of chemical fertilizer that are annually applied to the campus lawns. 

Primary Contact:
Michael Bradshaw
mjb34@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $35,000
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Ecological restoration efforts have been ongoing in Kincaid Ravine since the winter quarter of 2014.  The roughly 4 acre ravine located in the NE corner of campus was overgrown with invasive species, severely lacking in biodiversity and littered with trash when Martha Moritz (MEH ’14) began to plan restoration work to transform the ravine into an asset for the University and its surrounding community.  Over the two years since work began, myriad partnerships have developed around Kincaid Ravine that have led to high quality restoration work and continued plans to restore a healthy urban forest and enhance the campus connection with Kincaid Ravine for years to come. 

The student project management is now on its third master’s student and stakeholders include the Campus Sustainability Fund, Society for Ecological Restoration – UW Chapter, Office of the University Architect, UW Grounds, UW Restoration Ecology Network, EarthCorps and Stewardship Partners.  The wide array of project partners, and the time, money and energy already committed to restoration of Kincaid Ravine clearly demonstrates that this is a project destined to revitalize a neglected open space on campus while providing opportunities for student involvement.  There is much work still to be accomplished, but Kincaid Ravine is well on its way to becoming a healthy urban forest that not only provides ecological functions, but also opportunities for education, research and respite to those in and around the UW community.  

Primary Contact:
Dan Hintz
djhintz@uw.edu

UW Commuter Calculator
Amount Awarded:
 $30,000
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The proposed solution is a web-based tool which allows people toindicate the start and end-points of their commute and be provided with a “Commuter Profile” which gives them information about their commuting options including suggested routes (provided by Google Maps), estimated costs and benefits (money spent, calories burned, carbon emissions produced), resources available to UW commuters (e.g. U-PASS, bike facilities, ride-sharing resources, telecommuting policies, etc) and other motivational/inspirational information about the benefits of more environmentally friendly commuting options (e.g. profiles of commuters and expert advice offered by UW researchers and professionals). My vision is that a link to this tool would be provided to all students/faculty/staff to accompany the information that is sent out each quarter with the U-PASS (this is something that Transportation Services would help determine).

Purpose/Goal: To encourage low-impact commuting options by presenting information which conveys the message that these options are viable and achievable, and that they have significant health and monetary benefits as well as environmental ones.

Primary Contact:
Marilyn Ostergren
ostergrn@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $12,050
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The UW Floating Wetlands Project has the opportunity to be a unique and exciting deployment of a new technology and, as such, educating the public to the function of these structures is a top priority. Phase II will allow for outreach to the public and greater UW student body through the built demonstration wetlands, accompanying signage, publicity, and expanded partnerships for monitoring and stewardship of the project.  Permit approval, final design, and construction of the structures are all implemented in Phase II, and involvement and support from organizations such as Save Union Bay Association will provide education and outreach far beyond our own reach to those within the greater UW community. Furthermore, this project will serve as an example for other Seattle water bodies and showcase UW’s leadership role in green technology and public/community partnerships.

 
Primary Contact:
Jackson Blalock
jackson.blalock@gmail.com

Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

72 hours. 50 people. 12 schools. One World Changed!

Students from the Confronting Climate Change RSO are doing the exciting work of planning a student divestment convergence this spring 2016. Students from colleges across the northwest region will be coming together to strengthen the current fossil fuel divestment movement of the region.

The convergence is an important opportunity to build relationships and a strong community among a diverse set of people, who are just as passionate about the movement. Since most attendees are working with a similar purpose and advancing similar campaigns, they will share experiences and wisdom among peers to learn about and grow the climate justice movement. Trainers from organizations like Divestment Student Network, Race and Climate Justice Initiative, Rising Tide, Sightline Institute, and more will provide students with real insight on how they can make an impact in their community. Everyone will leave the convergence feeling empowered and able to make that impact. 

Primary Contact:
Ariana Winkler
arianaw2@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $10,185
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The Biodiversity Green Wall, Edible Green Screen and Water Harvesting Demonstration Project is a two-Phase project to be constructed at Gould Hall. Phase I is a Feasibility and Design Study and Phase II is Construction and Documentation. This proposal is to fund Phase I with work to be completed by the end of August, 2011. A student Design Team will lead the project from initial building assessment through construction and monitoring stages. As a Demonstration Project, students will transform a blank concrete wall into a showcase of improved habitat that fosters diverse native species, a rainwater harvest method, local food production, and systems that reduce building heating and cooling energy demand that can help the campus reduce its carbon footprint and achieve its sustainability goals. A student-led design and construction effort, the Demonstration Project will provide numerous campus benefits as well as enhanced hands-on education opportunities.

The Biodiversity Green Wall, Edible Green Screen and Water Harvesting Demonstration Project will address several aspects of sustainability outlined in the UW Climate Action Plan including water recycling, sustainable land use planning, sustainable and local food production, energy and carbon footprint reduction and UW green marketing and branding efforts.

Primary Contact:
Leslie Batten
gflab@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $88,319
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Our project involves replacing UW Mailing Service delivery trucks with five electric assist cargo bicycles complete with fully secured cargo boxes and trailers. This project entails restructuring our delivery methods to ensure efficiency and effectiveness of the bicycles. Through incorporating our main operation in the Publications Building, located in the Southwest campus, as well as two additional satellite locations, we can utilize our resources to cut costs and emissions. We are currently running a light bicycle operation (until full project implementation) from one of those satellites which is located in the Communications Building on central campus. The other satellite will operate from our UW Tower Mailing Services platform. 

Primary Contact:
Dylan Been
beend@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $890
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

While built environments provide people and society with a lot of benefits, they also have significant influence on our environment. According to EPA, people in the United States spend more than 90% of their time in the built environments. However, many of them feel less engaged with buildings since they have limited access to the information and knowledge about the buildings such as how the air is heated within the buildings? Many studies show that this lack of engagement will influence how comfortable occupants feel and how much environmental awareness they have within buildings.

In order to increase engagement with buildings, we explored the potential of using visual arts to convey information in a creative way. During the internship last summer in UW Sustainability Office, we focused on Paccar Hall, one of the LEED certified buildings on the UW campus. The previous study has shown that students have limited information about how this green building saves resources. After reviewing diagrams and audit reports, I made infographics on Adobe Illustrators by visualizing its information in terms of water and electricity used in the building. We will print them out and exhibit inside the building in a creative way that allows students and faculty members to walk into the display and to learn about where the resource used in Paccar comes from and how the sustainable features contribute to its LEED certification. Foster School of Business agreed with the idea and approved this project that will further promote their efforts of sustainability.

Primary Contact:
Eric Liang
liangz4@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $3,588
Funding Received:
 2011-2012
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The Carlson Leadership & Public Service Center is actively working to develop service-learning opportunities related to sustainability and environmental stewardship on and off campus, particularly for students in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines. The Center is applying for $3588 to fund a graduate or advanced undergraduate student to work as the sustainability service-learning liaison during Summer 2011. Please note, our letter of intent indicated a request for $3100.00. The slight increase is due to the increased number of weeks of funding needed to fund a student throughout the summer.

The current student service-learning liaison has seen success in the past two quarters, developing seven new partnerships with sustainability focused organizations, as well as starting a collaborative relationships with the Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Office and the UW Farm. Funding from the CSF would enable the Carlson Center to keep the current momentum that has developed this academic year towards sustainability focused service-learning opportunities. The student will take a leadership role in implementing three concurrent goals that will build the Carlson Center’s capacity to offer service-learning opportunities to students in the STEM disciplines:

Goal 1. Develop and expand partnerships with local non-profit organizations that address sustainability issues. The Carlson Center already has long-standing relationships with numerous environmentally focused organizations. In order to support an increased number of students involved in service-learning, it is important to develop opportunties at local organizations that will offer students diverse opportunities to volunteer in the community. It is our hope that students in the STEM disciplines will be able to bring different skill sets to the organizations than traditional service-learners have previously. The student will serve as a way for local environmentally focused organizations to connect with the University and for them to be aware of the sustainability efforts happening at UW currently.

Goal 2. Identify outreach and community engagement activities already occuring on campus, particularly in the STEM fields. Many programs on campus offer outreach to K-12 students in the form of assemblies, field trips, or more extensive summer programs. In order to better understand what types of programs are being offered to the community by UW, we plan to reach out to faculty members running these programs. We also plan to discuss the possibility of incorporating service-learning into the programs or related courses taught by the faculty members.

Goal 3. Build relationships with on campus entities that are dedicated to improving environmental awareness and sustainable practices at UW. Among the many groups working to improve campus sustainability, we have identified the Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Office and the Campus Sustainability Fund campus groups that are crafting a campus culture that is environmentally conscious. We hope to partner with these and other student groups across campus to provide students participating in service-learning opportunities to make a positive impact on campus sustainability.

Goal 4. Improve outreach efforts to sustainability focused Registered Student Organizations (RSO’s). Student groups across campus are demonstrating dedication to diverse issues in sustainability. We already have partnerships with various student groups, such as WashPIRG and the UW Farm. By connecting with more student groups, we hope to develop additional on-campus service-learning and volunteer opportunities and also link these groups with the environmental organizations in the broader Seattle community.

The new student liaison will address the goals listed above using the following strategies during Summer 2011:

Strategy 1: Develop Partnerships. The new student liaison will reach out to the organizations listed by the current liaison as organizations that would be suitable for service-learning partnerships, as well as research other potential organizations. This will involve site visits to organizations across Seattle to discuss the goals of the organizations and ways that students could provide support through service- learning. Specific organizations to reach out to include Sustainable Seattle, Sustainable Northeast Seattle, and Environment Washington.

Strategy 2: Identify Campus Activities. The current liaison has developed a list of summer outreach programs conducted by faculty in the STEM disciplines. Over the summer, the new student liaison will contact the leaders in these programs to learn more about what they offer to students in Seattle and also determine if service-learners could participate in the program during the academic year.

Strategy 3: Build Relationships with Campus Offices. The Carlson Center hopes to host a service-learning round table event during the Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Office’s “Sustainability Summit” held in the fall. At this event we plan to bring together faculty, some who have participated in service-learning and some who are interested in service- learning but have not used it in the classroom, and representatives from community environmental organizations who are familiar with service-learning to facilitate discussions about service-learning opportunities. The student liaison would take part in much of the planning of the event during the summer in order for it to occur in October.

Strategy 4: Build Relationships with Student Groups. The Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Office has already identified a list of Environmental RSO’s at UW. We plan to contact these groups during the early summer and late summer in order to talk about ways to provide support to them, as well as collaborate with them in the fall and throughout the year. We would also like to invite representatives of these groups to the round table event in the fall to discuss ways to incorporate on-campus service-learning and volunteer positions into the organizations.

Primary Contact:
Rachel Vaughn
rvaughn@u.washington.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $6,868
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

We are conducting a feasibility and design study for an app-based environmental challenge game that educates incoming student cohorts about sustainable practices on and around the UW campus. The challenge game concept is intended to orient new students to the sustainability resources in their new community, and create incentives and rewards - tangible and otherwise - for taking actions and adopting behaviors that conserve resources during their tenure at UW and beyond.

The three-part feasibility and design study will build on and incorporate existing sustainability efforts underway at UW, and engage with students in multiple ways to help determine game designs that will appeal to the most users. The study consists of 1) a scholarly literature review (spring/summer), 2) a "Game Jam" in the fall to engage students and staff across campus in creating game prototypes, and 3) a student survey on sustainability concerns and technology/gaming use (fall/winter). The feasibility and design study will result in a formal business plan developed around the top two game prototypes, with the intent of future implementation at UW. We are eagerly seeking student volunteers to assist with all project stages; if desired, we can work with students to develop resume-building experiences from their participation with this project. 

Primary Contact:
Lauren Kuehne
lkuehne@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $63,670
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The purpose of this project is to complete the tree inventory database for the University of Washington Seattle campus and to develop a comprehensive urban forest management plan. The campus tree data currently available is incomplete and outdated, making management challenging and evaluation of tree resources impossible. The goals are to capture the ecosystem benefits provided by the urban forest, effectively manage the urban canopy, and provide a database resource for future research and educational opportunities. 

Primary Contact:
Kristine Kenney
kkenney@u.washington.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $91,800
Funding Received:
 2011-2012
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The Biodiversity Green Wall, Edible Green Screen and Water Harvesting demonstration Project is a two phase project to be constructed at Gould Hall. Phase I, the Feasibility and Design Study, was awarded funding by the Campus Sustainability Fund in the summer of 2011 and will be completed by the end of the year. 

During Phase I, students coordinated with over 29 campus faculty and staff including the College of Built Environments, Campus Architect  and Landscape Architect, Capital Projects, and UW Grounds and Maintenance. This proposal is for $86,800 of support, about 80% of the cost to complete Phase II, Construction and Documentation, with work to be completed by August 2012. 

As an entirely student-led design and construction effort, students will transform a blank concrete wall into a showcase of improved habitat that fosters diverse native species, innovate rainwater harvesting methods, utilize solar power for lighting and irrigation pumping, try new methods of local food production, and test green systems that will potentially reduce building heating and cooling energy demand to help the campus reduce its carbon footprint and achieve its sustainability goals.  Successful implementation of the Demonstration Project may lay the groundwork for the construction of other green walls on campus, helping the campus achieve its multiple sustainability goals.

 

Primary Contact:
Leann Andrews
gfLab@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $14,000
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The Odegaard Library is one of the most utilized and occupied libraries on our campus. Thousands of students, faculty and guest use this facility on a 24-hour basis. The usage of water to flush the toilets of this facility is obviously unavoidable. This unavoidable act of water consumption is something we are looking to minimize. New technological advances are providing the world with water-efficient toilets capable of reducing water consumption while maintaining a level of cleanliness and sanitation. Our grant project aims to integrate dual-flush technology at the women’s bathrooms at Odegaard Undergraduate Library. Currently, the women’s toilet only has one flushing option at 1.6 gallons per flush. What we want to introduce is the same 1.6-gallon per flush for solid waste with the addition of a 1.1-gallon per flush for liquid waste. The Sloan EBV 550A Dual Flush Side Mount works as a sensor flushing system that will use a 1.1-gallon flush when the user has spent less than 90 seconds on the toilet and a 1.6-gallon flush for anything longer. With the implementation of these retrofit flushing mechanism, we hope to see a substantial reduction of water consumption, facilitating future water conservation projects throughout our campus.

Primary Contact:
Robert Chang
rman2595@gmail.com
Amount Awarded:
 $21,931
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:

Executive Summary

Students on the University of Washington campus lack awareness and exposure to solar energy and therefore lack in energy consumption mindfulness. They walk into libraries and buildings on campus and plug in to charge phones and laptops at all hours of the day, but rarely do they stop to consider the source of the energy they are benefiting from. Solar charging tables on campus will allow for hands on experience interacting with energy alternatives. The tables are visible and located centrally on campus; in front of the Husky Union Building (HUB). Our hope is that this one table will act as a pilot test, and will pave the way for increased excitement towards solar energy and its many applications, including installation of more solar charging tables throughout our diverse campus. Students across campus will be able to interact and benefit directly from the charging capabilities of the table and its longevity will ensure that students will have access to the table for over 25 years.

Primary Contact:
Zan Roman
zanroman@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,620
Funding Received:
 2011-2012
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The Biodiesel Cooperative is seeking funds to perform a vapor characterization analysis to determine the quantity of methanol vapor released from the Biodiesel Cooperative’s production process.

Characterizing the vapors released from the reactor is important, because the biodiesel conversion involves methanol. Methanol can cause health effects when inhaled. The OSHA permissible exposure limit for methanol vapor exposure is a time-weighted average of 200ppm over an 8-hour period. The Cooperative uses liquid methanol, but since the reactor is heated during the conversion some of the methanol may vaporize during reaction. It is important to know if any of this vaporized methanols is released, because it could have health effects. The Cooperative will also be determining the flammability risk with the vapor. This research has impacts that are potentially broader than just the Cooperative. The vapors released from small-scale biodiesel reactors have not been well characterized. The vapor characterization will help to keep small-scale biodiesel producers like the Cooperative safe.

The characterization will be performed in a temporary lab space allocated to the Cooperative by Engineering Facilities Services for the purpose of the vapor characterization. This project will be done in cooperation with Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S). The ultimate goal of the project is to determine the Cooperative’s lab requirements. Once EH&S agrees to the lab requirements, the Cooperative will be able to find a lab space that meets the Cooperative’s long term needs and insures its viability. The Cooperative will be in a much stronger position to fulfill its main goals after this characterization is complete. It will be able to begin to educate individuals in a small-scale alternative energy production, while also increase sustainability on campus by repurposing a waste stream into fuel for on-campus vehicles

Primary Contact:
Kathryn Cogert
cogerk@uw.edu

Photo Credit: Tyler Carrier
Amount Awarded:
 $52,700
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Friday Harbor Labs (FHL) is University of Washington’s marine biology laboratory on San Juan Island. FHL has a more than 100 year history of environmental stewardship as well as marine and terrestrial ecology research and education, and is a beacon of ecological connectedness and sustainability in the Pacific Northwest. Nevertheless, the lack of a fully sustainable solid waste disposal program at FHL represents a clear and easily addressable area for improvement. FHL hosts hundreds of undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, staff, and visiting scholars year round, and as such generates thousands of pounds of compostable food waste annually. Currently, all of this waste is shipped of island to a landfill in South-Central Washington. In 2014, FHL acquired an industrial Rocket A700 composter, which must be housed in a dedicated dry and animal-proof facility.

With this Campus Sustainability Fund grant, FHL will design and construct such a facility. This facility will feature:

* an enclosed space to house the composter;
* the ability to handle up to 700 liters of food waste per week, which is more than all current food waste production at the labs even during peak occupancy;
* a reduction in FHL-generated CO2 emissions* by nearly 11 metric tons per year;
* a yield of sufficient compost to cover a new, student-run FHL community garden as well as for all the landscaping needs on the FHL grounds;
* for the first time, a dedicated, publicly-accessible location at FHL for the disposal and ethical recycling of e-waste;
* educational signage describing our composter, other home composting methods, and the environmental benefits of composting and recycling.

The new FHL facility will be overseen by a new quarterly “FHL Student Compost Ambassador,” who will coordinate with the FHL administration, maintenance and cafeteria staff to plan, help construct and operate the facility. The Ambassador will also organize student volunteers to design and sustain the new community garden, and will submit quarterly reports to maintain continuity with future ambassadors.

*estimated using the student footprint calculator

Primary Contact:
Molly Roberts
earobert@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $2,500
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Hey everyone. The ASUW SFC seeks to create an on-campus food co-op. This means we- the students of UW- will collaboratively staff it, vision growth, and create a campus community around yummy food! The storefront will consist of a variety of popular dried/pantry bulk food items, ranging from snacks (nuts, dried fruit, candy) to kitchen basics (flour, beans, sugar). With this grant we can speed up construction and open the pantry by early 2017! We are currently seeking food and people enthusiasts to help run and staff the storefront once open! We also appreciate any input or help throughout this process. Shoot us an email if you are interested!

January 2017 Update Courtesy of The Daily.

Primary Contact:
Zoe Frumim
asuwsfcp@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $77,365
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The University of Washington Botany Greenhouse is a prime candidate for rainwater reclamation. Capturing rainwater that flows through the existing gutter system and re-routing it to storage tanks located within the confines of the greenhouse would save from purchasing city water, increase the quality of water used for irrigation, save energy currently used to warm irrigation water, and dramatically increase the thermal mass of the enclosed greenhouse space which would save on space heating energy demands. We are requesting $78,944 to fund this project.

The greenhouse demands approximately 350 gallons of water per day (corresponding to 128,000 gallons of water annually). In order to adequately meet this demand there must be a balance between the quantity of rain falling on the roof and the physical storing capacity of the greenhouse. It turns out that the limiting factor is the storing capacity of the greenhouse. To date there is available space underneath six of the tables to store six, 3ft diameter by 32ft long water tanks, allowing for a maximum storing capacity of 7050 gallons at any given time. These tanks would not impose a spatial burden on the greenhouse and could be connected to existing plumbing systems with relative ease. A volume calculation that took into consideration the average monthly rainfall rates in Seattle (in ft) and the available roof area that projects onto the floor of the greenhouse (in ft^2) gave the volume of rainwater supplied equal to 92,800 gallons/year. This accounts for 73% of the total water demanded, or in other words, 265 days of irrigation (assuming the tanks continuously remain filled to supply the greenhouse with at least a days demand of water) . As stated above, physical restrictions within the greenhouse are limiting the number of tanks to six. However, a year or two from now if it is decided that the rainwater reclamation system is effective enough to warrant an increase in storage capacity, it would be very possible to relocate materials currently located underneath the tables to a new location, freeing space for additional tanks. This proposal focuses on six tanks because it utilizes the space that is currently available, and also because inherent in any rainwater collection system is uncertainty in rainfall rates and overall system functionality. At this point in time 73% is a happy medium between available space, adequate irrigation supply, and reducing overflow potential on a high volume rain day. The Department of Biology, more specifically the UW Botany Greenhouse (managed by Doug Ewing), will be involved with this project.

Primary Contact:
Robert Goff
rwgoff5@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $36,300
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:

Executive Summary

In 2013, a proposal to build an outdoor "sustainable learning space" for Environmental Studies (Program on the Environment) students on the north lawn of Wallace Hall was born out of the tragic loss of Tikvah Weiner, then PoE Administrator, to breast cancer. At the end of her life, Tikvah spoke to the PoE community about her desire to see this area used for the benefit of students, as a demonstration of sustainable practices; a place where experiential learning extended out of the classroom and into the adjacent green space.

Following Tikvah's passing, a gift fund was established in her honor to help create the garden. In 2016, students as well as faculty and staff from Landscape Architecture, PoE, UW Grounds, UW Farm, Intellectual House (wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ), and College of the Environment Dean's Office came together to create an exciting plan to bring Tikvah's garden to fruition.Located on the east Fisheries lawn (immediately west of Parking W35), the proposed 9,000 ft garden will:

  • create an outdoor classroom allowing discussion sections of up to 20 students to use the space for learning "in the green," and more broadly as a place for the PoE community, and the UW community, to assemble, interact, socialize and learn from the space and each other.
  • showcase (including interpretive signage) a series of sustainability features, including the use/creation of:
  1. "green" (e.g., local, recycled content, natural, sustainable) materials throughout,
  2. a rain garden to handle on-site water management from all hardscape, and with the potential to handle a portion of roof run-off from Wallace Hall
  3. a "pocket ecosystem" featuring native and pollinator-based plantings providing habitat for native pollinators (e.g., bees) and songbirds,
  4. the use of culturally significant native species through collaboration with wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ staff, students and faculty working to highlight indigenous connection to and use of native natural resources,
  5. edible elements will also be considered, based on input from the campus Landscape Architect, the Grounds Manager, and the UW Farm Manager.
Primary Contact:
Rick Keil
rickkeil@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $13,694
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Our vision is to provide consumers at the University with the accurate knowledge of what is and what isn’t recyclable or compostable. Our software is built for tablets, and designed to be mounted on-site in front of waste containers. When a consumer approaches with waste, they can utilize the software to determine how to properly dispose of their waste, thus reducing the University's improper waste stream and improving consumer education.

Learn more about their product on the EvoEco website.

Primary Contact:
William Zhou
wjzhou@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $100,124
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Overview

We seek to restore Kincaid Ravine, a 2.2 acre urban forest in the northeast corner of campus. Our project will transform this neglected ravine from a declining and unsafe area to an ecologically healthy campus forest. This work will increase native species biodiversity, and enhance the ravine’s ability to perform important ecosystem services. It will also create an upland forested outdoor laboratory for academic exploration on main campus, as well as a space for students to engage with the natural world just steps from their residence halls.

Project Goals

1. Ecological restoration of Kincaid Ravine through removal of invasive species and re-establishment of appropriate native plant communities.

2. Engagement of students and academic units in both the initial restoration and long-term stewardship in order to create learning opportunities and environmental awareness.

Key Stakeholders

This project is being designed as a partnership between Martha Moritz (student project manager), Howard Nakase- UW Grounds (land manager), UW Botanic Gardens (faculty/administrative sponsor unit), and EarthCorps (outside expertise on restoration and major volunteer event coordination). Other project stakeholders in support of the restoration efforts include: Kristine Kenney,(Campus Landscape Architect), Josh Kavanagh (UW Transportation), Mike Ward- Seattle Department of Transportation (adjacent land owner), Kern Ewing and Jim Fridley (UW faculty members), the UW Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration, Phi Kappa Theta Fraternity (key volunteers), and a variety of other Registered Student Organizations (RSOs).

 

Project Phases

Planning - Spring and summer of 2013. We will lay the groundwork for success by: cementing important partnerships and conducting critical outreach with UW staff, academic units, RSOs, and other stakeholders for the initial restoration and long-term site stewardship; developing a restoration design; conducting baseline ecological monitoring; and preparing to launch the restoration work beginning in Autumn 2013. Prior to beginning the restoration efforts, the homeless encampments will be addressed in partnership with the UW Police Department, the Seattle Police Department and UW Grounds to remove any trespassers and clean up the associated debris.

Phase I - Autumn, Winter, Spring of 2013-2014. The work will involve major removal of invasive species, installation of hundreds of native plants, and other restoration work (e.g. slope stabilization, installing mulch, and creating maintenance access). This will involve EarthCorps crews and hundreds of student volunteers.

Phase II - Summer 2014-2016. The work during this time involves two to three years of maintenance, including ongoing invasive species monitoring which will guide continued removal of undesirable species regrowth, care for installed native species, and replanting when necessary. This phase will be performed in partnership with UW Grounds, EarthCorps, and student volunteers from academic units (e.g. UW Botanic Gardens) and RSOs.

Phase III - 2016 and on. The primary task will be minimal and ongoing invasive species maintenance. Based on the knowledge gained from decades of restoration experience in Seattle parks, we believe robust stewardship during the two years of Phase II will set the site on a trajectory for success and minimal maintenance in Phase III.

Primary Contact:
Matt Schwartz
mateos@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $14,840
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The Local Projects sector of the University of Washington Chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) will design phone charging stations powered by solar energy. Once the design is complete these stations will be implemented throughout the University of Washington Seattle campus, in convenient locations such as near bus stops and outdoor seating areas. The goal of this project is to provide sustainable, convenient charging for students and to illustrate how clean, renewable energy can power student lives.

The first part of the project will be a research and development phase. Our team will begin by creating an electronic design of the system with mathematical equations and measurements. There will be two main designs, the first being an electric system consisting of a battery, a solar panel, and a charge controller to regulate the amount of charge for students phones to work properly. The other design will be of the station itself, consisting of a locking metal box to enclose the electric system, with the solar panel on top, which will be covered by weatherproofing. Once our team and mentors (mentors consisting of Rebecca Neumann and Faisal Hossain) have approved the design we will move onto development. We want to make the most efficient, viable design possible, therefore we will build our first unit and run tests to make sure it works. Once that is completed we will implement the first unit on campus to gather data on use and effectiveness. This will help us determine where to build the next stations so they will be most useful and effective. This information, along with discussions between us and campus entities described in project approval, will help us to find the most viable on campus locations. 

Primary Contact:
Maeve Harris
maeveh19@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The Earth day celebration is a popular annual gathering at the University of Washington. This year marks the 45th anniversary of the event. On April 22nd, 2015 the event was put on by UW’s student run Earth Club and assisted by the UW sustainability staff. The goal of the organizers is to bring as many people together as they can to talk about our planet and sustainability. This year the celebration was located in Red Square in the center of campus. Thousands of people gathered to enjoy live music, free food and talk with the dozens of organizations who represented themselves with booths and tables.

Events like Earth Day are very important to sustainability at the University of Washington. They are effective outreach tools and help get thousands of people involved in sustainability on campus. The various clubs that table the event cover a broad range of environmental topics, from eating locally and being sustainable in your daily life, to thinking globally and getting involved in national policy. Many people who would not interact with groups focused on the environment are attracted to the sights, smells and sounds of the various events in Red Square. They mingle with the other students, speak with some of the student groups and RSOs and leave with a greater knowledge of what their peers are doing to make a difference to sustainability locally as well as globally.

The $1,000 that the CSF put towards Earth Day funded the rental of tents and tables for the event. With several dozen groups tabling and a few large tents the event was able to include a wide variety of sustainable groups. Other expenses included: purchasing compostable cups, renting a PA system and printing advertisements and decorations to promote the event. In addition to the CSF, the Earth club also received funding from ASUW and the College of the Environment. 

Primary Contact:
James Bao
jambao24@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $2,247
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Our ENVIR 480 Sustainability Studio project group partnered with Shelly Carpenter, lab manager at the Marine Sciences Building, to focus on reducing the water and energy consumption of commonly used lab equipment. We will install LED bulbs in one growth chamber in the Marine Sciences Building and faucet aerators throughout the building to test the viability of implementing these technologies in more campus labs.

Labs are hesitant to incorporate these products because no case study exists to demonstrate successful implementation. We have consulted with experts from several research institutions to identify the most beneficial, convenient, and cost-effective products available. This project will provide an example for other labs to reduce waste and earn net savings. It will also contain an educational component aimed to help other students organize similar projects in other facilities.

Primary Contact:
Kate Stevenson
kates17@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $21,176
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Local cleantech start-up SafeFlame aims to tackle a glut of high profile issues effecting people in developing nations. First among these is the potent issue of indoor pollutants. Globally, more than 3 billion people cook using biomass (wood, animal dung, crop waste, or charcoal). The indoor pollution created by burning these fuels results in over 4.3 million deaths annually with deaths particularly high among women and young children, who spend the most time within the home. Additionally, many of these solid fuels are gathered in an unsustainable manner by local communities causing severe deforestation.

SafeFlame’s service – which they call an untethered utility – is provided through biodigesters which SafeFlame technicians install directly into customers’ households. These digesters, which are serviced regularly by the team, break down organic content to produce biogas which customers can use to prepare meals on a standard gas cookstove. “Think of it like your water heater at home”, says CEO and current Foster MBA student Kevin Cussen, “Someone installs it somewhere in your house and as long as you pay your electricity bill you reap the benefits of hot water. Once we install a digester, all our customers need to do is pay their bill and they have access to clean burning gas at the turn of a knob.”

However, the start-up is currently working a little closer to home on a project sponsored by the University of Washington Campus Sustainability Fund. The small team has been tasked with building a biogas powered food cart “experience” for use at campus events and high foot traffic areas on the UW campus. The cart will cook food items and serve as a concrete educational aid on the applications of biogas as an alternative energy. Those interested in learning more or getting involved are encouraged to check out SafeFlame’s Facebook page or reach out directly to Kevin Cussen at kcussen@safeflamellc.com. For all others, keep your eyes peeled for this interesting contraption coming to an event near you this Spring!

Primary Contact:
Kevin Cussen
kcussen@safeflamellc.com

Amount Awarded:
 $50,965
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The Campus Illumination team envisions a campus with truly sustainable exterior lighting that enhances the campus experience, mitigates disruption to wildlife patterns, and operates with the most efficient use of energy. The team will collaborate with UW students, faculty, staff, and off- lighting design professionals to create a roadmap to guide future development and retrofitting efforts on campus. The roadmap will serve as a critical piece of campus infrastructure to ensure that lighting is implemented with a comprehensive vision as the University transitions to a sustainable nighttime campus. 

The guidelines presented in the roadmap will consolidate the design, technical, and operational expertise of various on- and off-campus entities to measurably reduce the electrical load of exterior lighting while ensuring that experiential and maintenance concerns are met. The project provides hands-on, applied learning experience for students, who will use the campus as a living laboratory for collecting and analyzing lighting data. The project establishes a methodology that integrates the perspectives of intra-institutional students, faculty, and staff to achieve our goal of holistically sustainable exterior lighting. 

Primary Contact:
Kelly Douglas
douglakm@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $2,335
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

 The "After Hours @ the Burke" event will be held at the Burke Museum. The proposed cost is $2,335. The event seeks to reduce plastic waste on campus by providing fun and informational activities that demonstrate what plastics are, the impacts of plastic pollution, and how the campus community can make a difference as responsible consumers and recyclers. The Burke Student Advisory Group is partnering with SEED. 

Primary Contact:
Danielle Acheampong
dacheamp@u.washington.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $52,000
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

UW Sustainability Action Network (UW-SAN) will be a campus wide sustainability resource center that provides online and in-person support for student driven projects. The online component of UW-SAN will consist of: 1) a blog and website with resources, events, updates on student projects, and archives of student organizations and projects, and 2) a networking website that connects student groups for coalition building and provides a space for projects to form. The in-person component will include student staff, volunteers, and faculty, based at the Center for Communication and Civic Engagement (CCCE). The UW-SAN team will provide in-person guidance, leadership, and support throughout the development and implementation process of student projects.

Primary Contact:
Emily Tasaka
emily3c@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,250
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Last year the UW student group ReThink used a CSF grant to organize the first UW Resilience Summit. This year they recieved another grant to host the event for a second year, with a paneled event that focuses on a specific topic relating to environmental and economic resilience.

Primary Contact:
Grace Dahl
graciedahl@gmail.com

Anastasia Stepankowsky | The Daily
Amount Awarded:
 $4,330
Funding Received:
 2013-2014
Project Status:
In progress, not accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

This proposal is for material and labor costs for students to design, fabricate and install interactive educational elements and habitat enhancements to the previously funded CSF project, the Biodiversity Green Wall, Edible Green Screen and Water Harvesting Demonstration Project at Gould Hall.  These improvements will include the installation of bird perches on the Green Wall, a prominent water level monitor on the cisterns, and interpretive signage with links to online data.  Gould Hall is located in a As is often the case for highly urbanized environmentareas, the environment surrounding Gould Hall is deficient in wildlife habitat and generates profuse amounts of polluted stormwater runoff.  where wildlife habitat is rare and polluted stormwater is abundant. Exposing the water harvesting capabilities, habitat value, and other benefits of the Green Wall project will help students and passersby to understand and envision more sustainable opportunities for dense urban environments.  The project will be implemented through the Green Futures Research and Design Lab (GFL) at the College of Built Environments and the student team will consult with applicable departments during design and construction (i.e. the Gould Hall building manager, campus facilities and engineering, CSF, UW Architecture Commission, and others).  Through this grant, the wall’s capacity to support biodiversity will be enhanced, and interactive and dynamic interpretive features will compellingly inform students, faculty and the public about the sustainability features and the performance of the Green Wall.

Primary Contact:
Cayce James
gflab@uw.edu

SER UW Chapter
Amount Awarded:
 $7,000
Funding Received:
 2013-2014
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The intent of this proposal is to support the University of Washington’s student chapter of The Society for Ecological Restoration (SER-UW) to better achieve our mission of promoting restoration ecology as a means of sustaining the diversity of life on Earth and reestablishing an ecologically healthy relationship between nature and culture. We are requesting funds to develop interpretive displays, more useable spaces at our on-campus restoration site, and resources to keep pace with our members interest in conducting both restoration projects and community outreach events (e.g. collaborative meetings, seminars, and travel to conferences).

Our restoration site, The Whitman Nature Walk, is located on north campus between Whitman Court NE and the Denny Field IMA tennis courts along the Whitman Walk pedestrian path (Fig 1). The northern section of Whitman Walk  is a small forest tract that has been restored by SER-UW over the past five years and is the nexus of our organizations efforts. This site embodies the mission of SER-UW and the proposed interpretive displays would be located here. SER-UW also participates in restoration activities at other locations across campus, and throughout King and Pierce Counties. We also maintain a native plant nursery at the UW Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH) and hold outreach events at the UW School for Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS). The total amount requested for these projects is $14,712  and would endow these increasingly popular activities.

Primary Contact:
Cameron McCallum
seruw@washington.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Since 2001, the Taiwanese Student Association (TSA) has brought this dynamic, cultural event to the University of Washington campus. Given its success, the UW Night Market has quickly become an annual Seattle tradition. Our goal is to bring people together in celebrating and appreciating Taiwanese culture. The event includes many vendors selling various Taiwanese foods, on-stage performances, as well as cultural activities. However, we don't want it to be just a cultural event, we also hope to increase community awareness of how to maintain a sustainable enviroment. This year, we are planning to implement a recycling program that helps reduce waste. We hope our CSF-funded program adds an environmentally-friendly lens to our event.

 
Primary Contact:
Emily Wan
ywan3@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $400
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The UW night market is an annual event, which is put on by the Taiwanese Student Association (TSA). The night market brings up to 20 vendors to red square to promote Taiwanese culture. Vendors sell a wide variety of cultural foods as well as running games and activities for market goers to participate in. There are also free musical performances put on by the TSA. 

Several thousand people usually attend this event and its popularity grows each year. In previous years the size of the event has caused problems in waste management. The University of Washington has strict rules regarding waste disposal and sorting waste into its correct receptacle. At such a large and exciting event many people may disregard signs on waste containers and throw everything in the same can despite whether it is garbage, recycling or compost. This year the TSA wished to eliminate this problem by better educating the public and providing guidance at the waste stations. To reach these goals the TSA reached out to the CSF to fund several aspects of their waste management. To improve the public’s knowledge of how UW manages waste the TSA created a slideshow and video explaining the differences between garbage, recycling and compost. These educational pieces were then shown on their website and presented at the night market event. In addition to these educational steps, the TSA also stationed volunteers at each waste station to ensure that everyone enjoying the festivities were correctly disposing of their waste into the respective container.

By taking these steps to better manage their waste the TSA has shown its dedication to make the University of Washington a more sustainable community. 

Primary Contact:
Helen Yang
hlyang24@uw.edu

Kincaid Ravine Facebook
Amount Awarded:
 $3,385
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Educational signage and benches for Kincaid Ravine aims to install 2 benches handmilled from leftover timber cut down by the campus arborist, and three 12"x12" educational signs designed by UW Museology students and produced professionally by Fossil Graphics. This educational "nook" is located just south of the wetland, on the eastern perimeter of the Kincaid Ravine restoration site, approximately 15 feet off of the Burke Gilman Trail (BGT). It will create an essential education and outreach component to the sustainability initiatives already occurring in Kincaid Ravine. The total budget of $3,382 includes the costs of design, materials, production, and shipping of signage, as well as materials and production of the benches. The Society for Ecological Restoration- UW (SER-UW) will spearhead installation. Kincaid Ravine Student Project Manager Matt Schwartz and the Kincaid Ravine 2015 intern Andrew Jauhola will coordinate and oversee the process.

Primary Contact:
Andrew Jauhola
ajauholawola@gmail.com

Amount Awarded:
 $33,000
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The University of Washington Farm (UW Farm) proposes to purchase and install a composting toilet at the Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH) farm site. There is increasing need for an outdoor bathroom facility at the farm, to support student famers working and volunteering at the UW Farm, as well as other groups using the space. In 2015, there were over 180 volunteers working at the farm. In addition, the farm offered tours to over 500 UW students in 2015 alone. The lack of a bathroom on the worksite negatively impact productivity and disrupts workflow (individuals have to stop work and leave the site to use the nearest restrooms), disrupts programing on the farm, and impedes access to any bathroom on weekends (the nearest bathrooms are locked on the weekend, a time when the farm has routine volunteer hours).

The farm would not be the only beneficiary however. An outdoor bathroom would greatly benefit a variety of community and university groups who operate adjacent to the farm. The facility would be an indispensable resource for: community visitors to the Union Bay Natural Area (UBNA) and the CUH during daylight hours; participants in the neighboring Seattle Tilth Youth Garden Works program; youth participating in other educational programs at CUH; student ecologists and volunteers doing restoration work in UBNA; and UW grounds and maintenance members who frequently do work in the area. 

Primary Contact:
Sarah Geurkink
sgeurk@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $700
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Doctoral Canidate Julie Kriegh is local architect and a graduate from the University of Washington. She works towards environmental health and sustainability across the Northwest. Her specialty is in the design of sustainable buildings that fit LEED certifications (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.) She has organized a panel which included multiple other experts in their fields. The speakers come from a broad range of academia and origins.  Dr. Manzo is an associate professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture at the University of Washington. Professor Loveland is a professor of Sustainability in Architecture and the Director of the Center for Integrated Design in the School of Architecture, College of Built Environments and the University of Washington.  Dr. Steg is a professor of Environmental Psychology at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. This panel promotes personal sustainability through behavioral change.

The first event will be on May 26th; the panel will meet in Alder auditorium for a free public lecture. This lecture is targeted at UW students and the speakers will discuss “Hot to inspire pro-environmental actions.”  A second event will be held later that day for the faculty and students of the College of Built Environments.  The third event will be a panel discussion at the Environmental Design and Research Association conference in Los Angeles.

The CSF’s funding of this event will go towards the expenses of Dr. Steg’s travelling from the Netherlands. 

Primary Contact:
Julie Kriegh
Julie@kriegharchitects.com

Amount Awarded:
 $999
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The UW Night Market has been an event held in Red Square every year since 2001. It is one of the Taiwanese Student Association’s signature events and easily the largest in scale in terms of people. The event recreates traditional night markets in Taiwan and is centered around food. Last year, we had 24 total vendors. Every year, this event creates large amounts of waste that isn’t properly disposed of by guests; this year, we plan to create a recycling plan that alleviates this issue.

The plan is based on ZeeWee, a Zero Waste Event. The goal is to heavily reduce waste with a three-step process. First: replace all food containers with recyclable ones. Some containers are vendor specific and will require funds to replace in house. The second step is to eliminate bottled water and replace them with water stations and recyclable cups, which will also require funds. The third step is to assign waste reduction tasks to staff and volunteers. These tasks will include monitoring garbage disposal bins to ensure proper sorting, after event cleanup, etc. Most importantly, the plan will require a radical redesign that will ensure a greener Night Market but will severely strain our already tight budget.

Primary Contact:
Anne Wu
wuanne15@gmail.com

Amount Awarded:
 $7,457
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Project Tap That's goal is to educate University of Washington (UW) students about the harmful effects of single-use plastic water bottles, promote the use of reusable water bottles, and ultimately ban the sale of plastic water bottles on campus. Many students do not equate their food and consumption choices with real world problems because the effects are not immediately (or ever) felt or seen by the consumer. Project Tap That seeks to bridge the educational gap between student consumption and environmental impact through a multi-year campaign−similar to Seattle University and Western Washington University−that will take the following steps:

  • A year of education and outreach focused on project visibility and spreading information about the impacts of disposable water bottles.
  • A second year of outreach focused on gaining student and faculty support through signatures while still spreading information.
  • An attempt to start a dialogue with UW faculty about renegotiating the contract with Coca-Cola and banning the sale of plastic water bottles on campus.

Project stakeholders and partners will mainly be UW students, HFS staff members, and UW Recycling administrators. The UW Earth Club will be assisting Project Tap That with outreach, putting up posters, handing out flyers, and tabling events. UW art students, (there are currently two), will be creating, designing and installing the art piece in the HUB by fall 2015, as well as helping with graphic design of educational materials. HFS representative Michael Meyering is supplying Project Tap That with information about water bottle sales on campus. Project Tap That will be using this information for educational materials and for the amount of bottles used in the art pieces. UW Recycling representative Liz Gignilliat has granted the project access to recycling bins, which will be placed around campus to procure bottles for the art piece. Director of the HUB Lincoln Johnson has approved the placement of 1-2 large art projects in two specific locations in the HUB. UW Art advisor Elizabeth Copland is assisting Project Tap with facilitating student interest.

Project Tap That is asking for a total of $7,456.59  to be used for art supplies, visual media, and 500 promotional reusable water bottles.

Primary Contact:
Lauren Rowe
laur.rowe@gmail.com

Amount Awarded:
 $337
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The teaching apiary at the UW Farm contains 10-12 hives of honey bees and is used by students to learn basic beekeeping skills and also to perform experiments in bee biology. The bee course has been taught Summer A+B terms since 2011. Support for the program derives from student fees, covering course-specific activities, and an account funded by donations and fund raising, which covers maintenance of the hives and equipment acquisition. Researchers from departments as varied as Chemistry and Psychology have used the hives as education and research subjects in past years. A move of the apiary to the CUH/UW Farm area was a logical progression following displacement of the hives by construction in 2015

Primary Contact:
Emily Schwartz
emiasch@uw.edu

UW Farm
Amount Awarded:
 $3,818
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Food scarcity in urban populations is a significant and growing problem that the world is beginning to address. Indoor farming is a solution that many are adopting. Growing food indoors allows food to be localized in densely populated areas, which can significantly decrease costs and increase quality and quantity. The largest obstacle to realizing these benefits is the prohibitive operating costs associated with traditional horticulture lights. The University of Washington is dealing with this same problem in the wide variety of greenhouses throughout campus. There is a clear need to retrofit these structures with energy efficient alternatives.

In partnership with the University of Washington (UW) Farm, as well as IUNU, a Seattle-based startup comprised of UW Alumni and graduate students, this project will increase the efficiency of the University’s indoor horticulture lighting systems. This project’s aims can be broken down into two separate phases; 1) to conduct a feasibility study to compare the energy usage and plant output of the High Pressure Sodium (HPS) indoor horticulture lighting systems currently used by UW Farm with the high-efficiency plasma lighting systems developed by IUNU; and 2) install the high-efficiency lighting systems in the newly constructed UW Farm greenhouse for supplemental lighting.

The feasibility study will aid the subsequent Education and Outreach of this project by collecting data over a twelve-week period on the energy usage and plant output of both the HPS and plasma systems. This data will be provided to the UW Farm so that they have evidence to justify retrofits and materials for education and outreach.

In order to conduct the feasibility study, lettuce, alliums, basil, and brassica will be grown as this is what the UW Farm intends to grow with the lights once they are installed in Phase Two. These varieties of vegetation were also chosen under the guidance of Liz Van Volkenburgh who is a professor in the Biology Department at the university and a specialist in plant physiology. In order to set metrics for the feasibility study, pounds per watt will be used to measure the energy efficiency of the two lighting systems. This metric uses the pounds of produce grown and compares it to the input-wattage used by each lighting system in order to display output in the context of efficiency. To test the quality of the produce grown, we will conduct a blind taste test and shelf life analysis.

Furthermore, plasma lighting is a relatively new technology and there is a demand for more research into its potential horticulture applications. Growing interest surrounding energy efficiency and indoor horticulture are driving these demands. Plasma light is estimated to be 30% more energy efficient than LEDs and 50% more efficient than high-pressure sodium systems. The UW’s ownership of plasma lighting fixtures will provide a resource for UW undergraduate and graduate students to have an opportunity to produce unique, marketable research in future endeavors.

Primary Contact:
Shane McLaughlin
shanemc@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The Green Greek Representative Energy Challenge is a challenge designed to make the Greek community more energy efficient, which will make it more desirable to people who choose housing based on sustainability. Through this challenge, we seek to educate men and women in the Greek community about making sustainable choices that will save them and their chapters money while also helping improve the environment. We have so many future ideas for this project, including expanding the Energy Challenge to encompass more houses in the Greek Community and even residence halls, making this project a campus-wide competition to see who can reduce their energy usage the most.

Primary Contact:
Jane Green
jgreen5@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $54,426
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The University of Washington’s Society for Ecology Restoration student guild (SER-UW) native plant nursery was established at the Center for Urban Horticulture in the spring of 2013. The SER-UW nursery maintains an inventory of 1000-1500 containerized plants native to the Puget Sound and used in planting efforts at two CSF funded restoration sites: Whitman Walk and Kincaid Ravine.  The nursery also delivers educational benefits to students studying horticulture and ecological restoration at UW by providing experiential learning through volunteer activities. On average, 30 students per quarter participate in nursery work parties that focus on basic horticultural practices.  The work that SER-UW conducts is an applied complement to the curricula of the Master of Environmental Horticulture program (MEH) and the ESRM Restoration Ecology concentration. Although often overlooked, horticulture is an important facet of ecological restoration; understanding proper growing techniques and identifying or growing high quality nursery stock is imperative to successfully achieving restoration project goals. 

Phase I: In addition to the programing that SER-UW already provides, infrasture upgrades will be made in order to increase plant production capacity and quality of care for our plants. This includes building a hoophouse exclusively for the SER-UW Nursery with storage, a potting bench, growing tables, an irrigation system, and a pot-washing station. Co-managers will be funded to work 15 hours a week to construct everything but the hoophouse. Our first crop of natives will be planted, and will be ready to sell in the fall of 2016. Co-managers will initiate discussions to find permanent funding sources for a full-time manager position.

Phase II: A new set of co-managers will focus on increasing the clientele of the nursery in order to grow more plants for campus and UWBG Arboretum planting projects, in addition to providing a suite of commonly used plants for capstone and MEH projects. They will also focus on obtaining a long term funding source for a permanent full-time position.

Phase III: The nursery will transition into a campus recharge unit or self-sustaining center. A single full-time manager will be in charge of plant production, education, and sales. 

Primary Contact:
Kelly Broadlick
kbroadli@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The University of Washington has over 161 acres of turf grass.  Grounds maintenance, at the University applies a custom, slow release chemical fertilizer (F-6 Wil-Grow Wil-Cote Custom-CFM 25-0-5) for all turf applications. Chemical fertilizers can be detrimental to the environment and to the long term health of soils. With global warming at the forefront of scientific research, it is imperative that alternative, environmentally friendly lawn care systems are implemented. Revising the fertilizer plan for the lawns is a potentially important step for grounds management to undertake.

This project attempts to quantify the effects of endophytes (microorganisms that live within plants) on turf grass in the field. The Doty lab, at the School of Environmental and Forest Science, have isolated endophytes from poplar plants. These endophytes have shown to increase plants drought tolerance and decrease their reliance on nitrogen fertilizers. This project will analyze if inoculating the lawns with endophytes can decrease the amount of water and chemical fertilizers that are used by grounds management. 

Primary Contact:
Michael Bradshaw
Mjb34@uw.edu

ReThink
Amount Awarded:
 $1,605
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

While many RSOs focus their events on a single topic or target a specific major, ReThink’s goal is to reach as wide of an audience as possible, and we are seeking funding for an event that will do just that. We are requesting $1726 to host a “Resilience Challenge” which will implore participants to consider and engage with real-world problems surrounding predominantly business and the environment. This event is modeled after the Resilience Challenge hosted by Sustainable Seattle on October 2nd (more information on this event can be found here: http://pnwresilience.org). Located in the HUB, ReThink will team up with several clubs from across campus to draw an ideal crowd of around 100 students for the event. These students will spend three hours listening to panels of industry specialists, discussing relevant topics in breakout sessions, and collectively creating a plan of action with a realistic timeline and implementation strategy.

Beyond the experience members of the planning committee will gain from organizing and marketing this event, all participants of the Resilience Challenge will get exposure to a diverse array of students from other disciplines, and informative and inspiring presentations and discussions from professionals in their fields of interest. It is a fantastic opportunity for students to broaden their perspectives from the narrow views represented in their respective majors.

To ensure the Resilience Challenge draws the numbers we have projected, ReThink will partner with all participating parties and RSOs to employ a collaborative outreach strategy. This will involve placing marketing materials such as posters in the various buildings of departments we are seeking to target, and coordinating our online advertising through list serves and Facebook promotion.

To be clear, our event does not address one specific environmental problem, but rather a broad array of challenges that persist in today’s society. We will provide the information for participants to become educated on these important topics, and resources for them to learn how to get engaged.

Due to the nature of the event, the measurability of the event prior to its conclusion is quite limited. However, one the key outputs of the discussion segment of the event will be to come up with time-sensitive goals, and a way to measure them. We will then assign a student representative to each these goals in order to monitor overall progress towards them.

The following report will enumerate the specific event objectives, logistics, and funds requested.

Primary Contact:
Will Fantle
kszile@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $550
Funding Received:
 2016-2017
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Radical Public Health UW is hosting an evening of discussion and consciousness-raising about the root causes and myriad dangers of the global climate change crisis. In the current political context, local and global, it is more important than ever before to have honest, unapologetic discussions about this growing emergency.

Schedule: Doors open at 5, event begins at 5:30.
5:30 - 6:30 Dr. Rob Wallace
6:30 - 7:30 Women of Color Speak Out

The event will be led off by Rob Wallace, an evolutionary biologist and public health phylogeographer based at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Wallace will give a lecture titled "Capitalocene Park: Lucrative Risks in Neoliberal Public Health", analyzing public health and climate change in the context of John Bellamy Foster and Jason Moore's debates over the effects of capitalism on nature (and more specifically on influenza and other pathogens).

The discussion will continue with Women of Color Speak Out leading a panel on climate justice through an intersectional lens, connecting global warming to systems of oppression. Women of Color Speak Out has been a consistent and powerful force in climate justice activism in Seattle, and we are very excited they will be here with us to share their experiences, insights, and perspectives.This event is free of charge and open to the public. Spread the word and bring a friend!

Primary Contact:
Nicholas Graff
nrg6@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $398
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The Prairie Rain Garden is a student run project located near the botanic gardens on the north-east corner of campus. The students involved are trying to improve the ecosystem of a small plot of land by removing invasive species, improving the topography and planting a healthy native plant garden. The garden’s location is just uphill of a trail which is frequently flooded during the rainy season and becomes extremely muddy and impassable. The Prairie Garden is designed to capture some of the rainfall, filter the water and drain it to prevent runoff flowing onto the path.  

            The project will focus on several areas of environmental impact. The water flowing through the Prairie Garden will mostly be runoff from a parking lot located above the area. By creating a better drainage system and planting native plants along the storm water’s path; the garden will help filter out some of the toxins flowing off the parking lot through sediment capture, pollution degradation and nutrient uptake. Through the garden’s topographical landscaping, which mimics Washington states prairies, storm water will be reduced by absorption and evaporation. This will not only protect the walking path located below the garden, but also the native plants in the area from flood damage. The reintroduction of native species follows the nearby Union Bay Natural Area’s current objective and moves the project into greater levels of restoration.

The money awarded by the CSF will largely go to purchasing native plants to place in the garden. In addition the students will use funding to purchase topsoil, pots, drain rock and tools to build the garden. The hope of the students working on the garden is that others will see their low-resource venture and be inspired to begin a project of their own. 

Primary Contact:
Malcolm Howard
mfhoward@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $5,350
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

This photographic series, soon to be created by Ballo Conservatio, will investigate the relationship that humans have with environmental resources and the resulting outcomes of our daily decisions when considering sustainability. Joseph Blake, a UW Dance Program MFA Candidate, and photographer Steve Korn’s collaboration anticipate the design of eight, poster-sized works (although they will be framed objets d’art) involving dancers from the University of Washington’s Dance Program interacting with elements such as oil, water, plastic, paper, and addressing ideas such as erosion and excessive refuse. The combination of dance, photography and digital editing will offer an evocative reminder for us to be vigilant about the University's carbon footprint.

Dance celebrates the raw and natural form of the body, just as sustainability ideals honor the natural resources of our planet. The confluence of the dancing human body and earth's inherent gifts creates a powerful tribute to nature.

The premier of the series will open in Meany Theatre’s gallery space at the beginning of the World Concert Series 2016-2017 academic year and continue hanging until December 15th. There will be a temporary move the week of October 26th for the work’s showing at the University of Washington’s Sustainability Festival.

jo and Steve are beyond excited to include their voice and creativity in this effort to spread the word about sustainability, human concern and university awareness through their mediums of work.

Primary Contact:
Joseph Blake
jbblake@uw.edu

Kincaid Ravine Facebook
Amount Awarded:
 $5,000
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The Kincaid Ravine Bioswale Hydrological Assessment seeks to conduct a feasibility and assessment study on potential hydrologic modifications and designs for a bioswale in Kincaid Ravine will not only help address the issue of flooding on the Burke-Gilman Trail at the edge of Kincaid Ravine, but will also add to the ongoing efforts to restore the ecological functions and habitat of the previously underutilized and ecologically degraded four acre open space located in the northeast corner of campus.

This assessment will focus on characterizing the quality and quantity of the water moving through Kincaid Ravine and determine the feasibility of constructing a bioswale that will help alleviate flooding and allow for better stormwater treatment, storage and infiltration in Kincaid Ravine. This will require lab testing for water quality and soil and some hydrologic monitoring and modeling to determine the amount of water moving through the ravine during the wettest months. In congruence with the soil and water quality testing (which will be done on campus), we will use outside consulting from the group 12,000 Rain Gardens in Puget Sound to help provide assessment of current hydrology (approximate volumes and sources of water, outflow volumes, and soils assessment), bioswale feasibility assessment, summary report of hydrology and feasibility, and bioswale basic design (approximate elevations and planting plan).

Developing this assessment study instead of moving hastily into design and construction is a prudent first step in properly addressing the hydrology issues in Kincaid Ravine and making sure the numerous groups and administrative interests associated with Kincaid Ravine are all satisfied with the work going forward.

Primary Contact:
Daniel Hintz
djhintz@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $27,400
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The UW Shellfish Farm is a project conceived by several graduate students, faculty and staff at the School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences (SAFS), in collaboration with the School of Marine & Environmental Affairs (SMEA) and the College of the Environment. We seek to establish a student-run shellfish farm at the Big Beef Creek Research Station, a SAFS field site on Hood Canal. The overarching goals of the project are:

1)    Provide students and with a hands-on opportunity to experience sustainable seafood production.
2)    Conduct outreach and education on estuarine health and climate change impacts on the marine environment.
3)    Conduct monitoring to quantify environmental impacts of shellfish aquaculture on estuarine health.
4)    Serve as a field site for ongoing shellfish research at UW.
5)    Become self-sustaining by selling cultivated shellfish (e.g. clams, oysters) through wholesalers, UW dining establishments, a subscription service, and other outlets.

Our proposal is divided into two parts:

Phase I consists of a feasibility study for the Farm, including the development of a full business plan and management model, assessment of permitting requirements for commercial shellfish aquaculture and sales, initiation of permitting process through all necessary channels, formalization of partnerships with industry and other regional stakeholders (i.e. tribes, NGOs). We are poised to begin Phase I in Fall 2015.

Phase II consists of full implementation of the plan, namely the acquisition of grow-out materials, recruitment of student interns and volunteers, construction of a physical shellfish grow-out system at Big Beef Creek, acquisition and planting of shellfish “seed”, and development of educational and outreach material. Research conducted through Phase I will inform our cost estimates for Phase II.

We currently seek funding from the CSF to initiate Phase I. Funds requested will support a graduate student from the SMEA to conduct the feasibility study over three academic quarters, and will allow us to hire legal counsel to evaluate the legal requirements for developing an aquaculture operation on University property and to assist with the permitting process. 

Primary Contact:
Daniel Gillon
dgillon@uw.edu
Amount Awarded:
 $8,616
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

          Our project, HydraPower, is a new, innovate technology that produces clean, alternative energy. HydraPower functions by capturing and generating energy from light, specifically infrared (IR) light. The device collects energy from ambient IR light, which is ubiquitously present at all times of day. Therefore, it provides stable power at all times of day without needing additional power supplied by rechargeable batteries. The ability to generate constant, stable power is a stark improvement from solar photovoltaic technologies, which are limited by sunlight.

          The total cost of this project is $12,000. With this funding, we will create three fully functional prototypes by September 2015 and install them in UW campus buildings in late September, prior to the 2015-16 academic year. We’ve broken our project’s timeline into two phases. The first phase includes the physical development of three prototypes over the next six months, from April through September 2015. The second phase includes the physical installation of these devices in buildings on the UW campus, as well as continued development of prototypes that provide increased energy outputs. Funding from the Campus Sustainability Fund is intended for phase one, which will support the creation of three fully-functional devices to utilize in UW buildings for phase two. Currently, we have formal approval from the W.H. Foege Building to install one device and an accompanying poster in the building. Although we have received verbal confirmation, we are awaiting the final signature from Parrington Hall to set up the device and poster. Our third building site is still to be determined; however we are targeting one of the campus libraries in order to maximize visibility to the entire student body. Other than their locations, there are no differences between the three devices.

          HydraPower’s brief history began in 2010 as a research project developed by Kurt Kung, a PhD candidate in Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering. The initial idea for this technology stemmed from basic water research in Dr. Gerald Pollack’s laboratory. Upon realizing the technology’s potential, Kurt began to develop an initial prototype which generated one nano-watt of energy. Currently, the technology can produce nearly one milli-watt of energy output. Despite the relatively low power output, the technology’s future potential is demonstrated by its recent history of exponential improvement. The output has increased to create nearly 1,000,000 times the energy since its first iteration, and our current research suggests that similar increases in energy output are feasible.

          We will begin by using these devices to help power wireless sensors in several campus buildings. Specifically, our device will be placed alongside current remote sensors in these buildings, where they will initially help generate power needed without being the sole power source. As our prototypes prove their consistency, they will then become the main power source for these sensors.

Primary Contact:
Kurt Kung
ckung@uw.edu

Cassie Czarnetzke | The Daily
Amount Awarded:
 $89,682
Funding Received:
 2013-2014
Project Status:

Executive Summary

The University of Washington Biodiesel Cooperative is an undergraduate-led registered student organization that was established in 2010 as a way for students to become more involved in waste management and alternative energy through hands-on learning. After losing our lab in 2011 to an incoming professor in the Bioresource Science and Engineering Department, the Cooperative has spent the past three years seeking a permanent lab space. We collaborated with the Chemical Engineering Department to acquire temporary lab space in 2012, and through a CSF grant, were able to perform basic tests on our old biodiesel reactor. From these tests, UW Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) deemed our old reactor unsafe to run indoors without proper ventilation, and required us to narrow our search for space to facilities with chemical fume hoods.

After receiving a unanimous approval and support from ASUW in the form of an initiative to find our group permanent lab space, we contacted vice provosts, deans, department chairs and facilities services to help us in our search. Although we were heavily supported, there simply was not a viable space to support our group. Luckily, in the spring of 2013 we caught a breakthrough with UW Transportation Services and Joshua Kavanagh, who offered an open lot to us on their grounds off 25th Ave, as a part of UW Motor Fleet property. Since this time, we have collaborated with Transportation Services and the Capital Projects office to plan and permit the location with the city for the installation of a retrofitted shipping container laboratory. This new facility will be modeled out of a large shipping container, and will contain a functioning biodiesel reactor that eliminates on-campus waste through the conversion of used cooking oil generated by the campus restaurants into fuel-grade biodiesel. With the financial support of the Campus Sustainability Fund to cover the expense of building, permitting, and supplies, the UW Biodiesel Cooperative will finally be able to make this vision a reality.

When compiled, these costs are substantial, and so we are proposing a request of $89,682 to cover our startup expenses. Approximately $30,000 of this cost will cover the shipping container design and purchase, $20,000 will cover foundation and land preparation and the remaining costs will go to permitting and salaries for architects, inspections and planning services. From a previous grant from the CSF in 2012, we were able to quantitatively justify our need for a professional biodiesel reactor though vapor characterization, and from this, gained the support of the College of Engineering, as well as a sponsorship of $8,000 to go towards the purchase of a new biodiesel reactor. Additionally, the lot for our new lab saves us a significant operational costs, as Transportation Services has allowed us to occupy the space rent-free.

The website for UW Biodiesel is http://students.washington.edu/biofuel/, and current officers can be found and contacted through the officers/contact tab.

Primary Contact:
Group Inactive
_

Amount Awarded:
 $16,100
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The proposed project's goal is to create an education program for elementary school children to tour the Farm and learn about sustainable agriculture and healthy food choices.  The proposed project requests funding for two main components: 1) the creation of a physical space on the Farm where children can explore and garden and 2) the acquisition of educational materials and supplies needed to run an educational outreach program that provides rigorous, curriculum-driven field trips with engaging and interactive educational activities.

Expanding the education program entails building a Children's Garden adjacent to the production beds of the UW Farm located at the Center for Urban Horticulture.  Currently field trips are carried out in the garden beds that are devoted to food production. While the interactive component of field trips is vital to student engagement and essential for assimilation of new skills and knowledge, it is not sustainable to have large numbers of children sowing and harvesting in the Farm’s production beds without adversely impacting food production.  The Children's Garden will consist of raised beds where children can implement the sustainable farming practices they observe on the Farm.  Perennial herbs, edible flowers, fruit bushes and dwarf fruit trees, delightful for the senses, will surround the periphery of the Garden.  The idea is to grow taller plants around the edge of the Garden to physically contain the children and create the feel of an outdoor classroom.  The UW Farm will soon have honeybees, creating the added need to carefully manage the flow of children through the farm; the garden design will help regulate their movements with natural garden barriers, clear paths and an inviting garden entrance. The designated site for the Children’s Garden on the southern edge of the UW Farm was once a landfill in the 1920’s before the University of Washington was gifted the land.  The UW has done a laudable job restoring the wetland ecosystem including capping and safely contained the landfill but raised garden beds seems advisable on the site nonetheless.

 
Primary Contact:
Amy Hughes
ash7@uw.edu

http://www.wilmingtonnc.gov
Amount Awarded:
 $17,517
Funding Received:
 2013-2014
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Creation of the Sustainable Stormwater Coordinator (SSC) position aims to designate a SEFS research assistant appointment to spread awareness about and physically improve stormwater treatment on campus. This will be accomplished by investigating the current quantity and quality of campus stormwater, analyzing a suite of suitable water management tools, and building a collaborative student-faculty-administration approach to this pressing issue. In sum, this project will seek concrete and actionable runoff strategies, informed by water quality testing of discharges from parking lots, rooftops and sports fields.

Primary Contact:
Matt Schwartz
mateos@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $23,872
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary
The UW Shellfish Farm concept is a collaborative effort between students and faculty from the UW School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences (SAFS), School of Marine & Environmental Affairs (SMEA), and Department of Biology, along with Taylor Shellfish Inc. and other shellfish industry stakeholders. We seek to establish a student-run shellfish farm at the Big Beef Creek Research Station, a SAFS field site on Hood Canal. The Farm is a two-phase project, and was awarded one year of funding from the Campus Sustainability Fund in Summer 2015. Phase I (feasibility study and business plan) was completed in Summer 2016. The current project sets out to conduct an aquaculture research trial at the Big Beef Creek Research Preserve (BBC), where the farm will eventually be located. This project will provide critical biological information on optimal conditions for shellfish aquaculture that will inform implementation.
The successful implementation of the UW Shellfish Farm concept depends on characterizing intertidal areas at BBC that exhibit optimal environmental conditions for shellfish growth. To that end, our team will deploy different shellfish species at multiple sites at BBC, monitoring growth, survival, and environmental conditions over the course of one year. Campus Sustainability Funds will be used to purchase necessary culture supplies (e.g. re-usable cages) and shellfish seed, and will support students to conduct the grow-out of shellfish at BBC. The students will also continue the ongoing permitting process initiated in Phase I, assist in developing educational outreach material, and use the data generated to initiate a long-term environmental monitoring program as highlighted in our Phase I proposal. Involved students will gain firsthand knowledge and skills required to operate a shellfish aquaculture business.

 

Primary Contact:
Steven Roberts
sr320@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $4,500
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:

Executive Summary

Husky Sustainable Storms (HSS) in conjunction with the University of Washington and Huitt-Zollars, Inc. is upgrading the existing stormwater infrastructure of the N1 parking lot. A sustainable system, known as a biofiltration planter will be installed on Stevens Lane. This is a large walkway connecting the University District neighborhood to campus. An estimated 2,000 students use this walkway each day. In addition to conveying stormwater from the N1 parking lot, the new green infrastructure will reduce the velocity and pollution of stormwater drained from the parking lot.

HSS consists of seven students representing 5 departments, 2 Colleges, and ranges from undergraduate to Ph.D. students. HSS has been collaborating with the Universities’ Staff in the following departments: Facilities, Transportation, Planning, and Civil Engineering.

For more information on the full project team and an elaborated description of the project, please visit huskysustainablestorms.org.

Primary Contact:
Stefanie Young
sy10@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The Earth day celebration is a popular annual gathering at the University of Washington. This year marks the 45th anniversary of the event. On April 22nd, 2015 the event was put on by UW’s student run Earth Club and assisted by the UW sustainability staff. The goal of the organizers is to bring as many people together as they can to talk about our planet and sustainability. This year the celebration was located in Red Square in the center of campus. Thousands of people gathered to enjoy live music, free food and talk with the dozens of organizations who represented themselves with booths and tables.

            Events like Earth Day are very important to sustainability at the University of Washington. They are effective outreach tools and help get thousands of people involved in sustainability on campus. The various clubs that table the event cover a broad range of environmental topics, from eating locally and being sustainable in your daily life, to thinking globally and getting involved in national policy. Many people who would not interact with groups focused on the environment are attracted to the sights, smells and sounds of the various events in Red Square. They mingle with the other students, speak with some of the student groups and RSOs and leave with a greater knowledge of what their peers are doing to make a difference to sustainability locally as well as globally.

            The $1,000 that the CSF put towards Earth Day funded the rental of tents and tables for the event. With several dozen groups tabling and a few large tents the event was able to include a wide variety of sustainable groups. Other expenses included: purchasing compostable cups, renting a PA system and printing advertisements and decorations to promote the event. In addition to the CSF, the Earth club also received funding from ASUW and the College of the Environment. 

Primary Contact:
Lysia Li
lysialee@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $4,050
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The K-12 Education for Sustainability Student Outreach Coordinators will be based in the office in the Center for Experiential Learning and Diversity.   The Coordinators’ primary project goals will be to diversity and increase the overall number of students and community partners engaged in K-12 environmental education and ensure continued and expanded opportunities for UW students to promote sustainability through K-12 outreach and education.

The total proposed cost of the Student Outreach Coordinators is $4,050.  This includes funding for: 1) one hourly undergraduate student at $11 per hour for 10 hours/week during Winter 2013 (10 weeks) and 5 hours/week for Spring 2013 (10 weeks) and 2) one hourly graduate students at $15 per hour for 8 hours/week during Winter 2013 and Spring 2013 for a total of 20 weeks.

This project addresses the importance of raising the public’s awareness and environmental ethic to achieve optimum environmental impact through inclusive, high quality K-12 environmental education efforts.  By diversifying, strengthening and expanding K-12 environmental education opportunities, this project will develop the environmental ethic of both a diverse population of UW students and K-12 students.

Pipeline’s Environmental Alternative Spring Break (EASB) program began in 2006 with 4 undergraduate students and one school partner, the Quileute Tribal School in La Push, WA.  In 2009, a Mary Gates Leadership Scholarship recipient worked with Pipeline staff to add one additional school partner, Brewster Elementary in Brewster, WA, so 10 undergraduate students now participate in EASB annually.  There is growing interest to develop more school partnerships since the program has to turn away many interested applicants each year since the demand exceeds the number of participant spots available.  The EASB program has historically been heavily administered by Pipeline Project staff and could greatly benefit from a self-sustaining student-led model to increase the capacity of the Pipeline project to not only ensure the sustainability of this program for future students but also to spur innovation and expansion.

Metrics analyzed for over the last 6 years reveal that since 2006, the Pipeline Project’s K-12 environmental and sustainability education service-learning seminars have enrolled 126 students who have served in 15 different K-12 schools or community organizations.  Due to increased enrollment in this service-learning seminar, it will be important to cultivate new community partnerships with a K-12 environmental education focus.  While no formal quantitative analysis has been administered concerning student demographics, observations and informal discussion demonstrate that Pipeline’s environmental education initiatives largely attract white and more affluent student populations, a pattern that is reflective of the larger environmental movement in the United States.

If we do not receive funds from CSF through this grant, we will be able to sustain our current programming efforts and relationships with community partners, but we will not be able to create new partnerships, nor increase our outreach to students or develop new strategies to increase the diversity of UW students engaged in K-12 education for sustainability efforts.  In addition, CSF funding will ensure the long term sustainability of the Environmental ASB program as attention will be given to document and develop the infrastructure for a self-sustaining student leadership program model.

The Pipeline Project’s website can be found at http://expd.uw.edu/pipeline.  The Pipeline Project is led by Director Christine Stickler and Associate Director Francesca Lo.  Four returning Environmental Alternative Spring Break (EASB 2013) undergraduate participants – Mariah Doll, Jessie Huang, Laura Pfeifer, and Max Sugarman – are currently serving as Team Leaders for EASB 2013.  Samanatha Dolan, a graduate student, is currently facilitating the Winter 2013 K-12 Education for Sustainability service-learning seminar.  

Primary Contact:
Christine Stickler
castick@uw.edu

http://www.ce.washington.edu
Amount Awarded:
 $32,000
Funding Received:
 2014-2015
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

The Construction Materials Laboratory at More Hall is an instruction laboratory where undergraduate students of the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) and the College of Built Environments (CBE) study different construction materials and gain hands-on experience with mixing portland cement concrete. In order to achieve the desired strength and durability of the concrete, the concrete structures are cured in a fog room adjacent to the CML. Curing is a process of providing adequate moisture, temperature, and time to allow the concrete to achieve the desired strength and durability.  The fog room produces ultra-fine water droplets in the air that is closely monitored by a programmable system that controls the humidity and temperature setting.   Currently, the prescribed relative humidity condition in the fog room is ensured by continuously sprinkling potable water to the room via two sprinkler heads with an average rate of 1200 gallons/day. By proposing to install a rainwater collection and purification system in and adjacent to the laboratory space, we seek to provide CML with a supplementary, sustainable source of water for fog room use. This will result in reducing the laboratory’s tap water consumption by an average of 600 gallons/day. The quantifiable economic benefit equals $1,800.00 per year in water consumption.  In addition to the economic benefits, the proposed project will serve as a campus wide educational tool and give University of Washington students, faculty and staff the possibility to learn more about innovative use of sustainable water management practices.

Primary Contact:
Heta Kosonen
hetak@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $3,000
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The UW Real Food Challenge (RFC) is a registered student organization (RSO) seeking the involvement of the University community to increase the volume of locally and responsibly sourced foods available for sale in campus dining and retail facilities. The Real Food Challenge is also the name of national organization that is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit. The University of Washington student group is a concordant body of this organization.

To effectively bring about change in the campus food system and to recognize where each university stands in regards to how much “real food” (ecologically-sound, locally based, fair, and humane food) it provides to its consumers, the Real Food Challenge has developed a web application called the Real Food Calculator. Universities and businesses may use this utility to gauge the percentage of real food they procure.

The students of RFC at UW are using the Calculator utility this academic quarter to assess the amount of real food that HFS purchased during the months of January and February 2013. This amount will be quantified as a percentage of the annual food procurement budget. We are requesting a grant of $3000 to fund future Calculator work after the completion of the spring project. To be explicit, this grant would support the Calculator project of 2014, ensuring its endurance as an annual assessment. The Calculator is an entirely student-driven project that relies on the support of HFS Vending Manager Micheal Meyering. Extensive outreach and educational efforts are required to engage the student population in the immediate campus food system, and we believe this grant and responsible spending will allow us to have a larger presence and impact on campus.

Using the results of the Calculator audit we are conducting this spring, we can provide an analysis of where UW stands in the greater national food system. If our Calculating work is continued as an annual institutional assessment, the progress reflected in the results can be charted and used by the University not only to improve its own food procurement standard, but the national standard as well. We intend to formalize the results of the Calculator and use them to propose the Campus Commitment. The commitment is a food sustainability policy that commits institutions of higher education to an increase in real food procurement.

Check out the complete assessment here!

Primary Contact:
Dani Gilmour
danigilm@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $7,500
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

UW-Solar is a student-led organization working with architecture firm Perkins+Will to install building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) on the new Life Sciences Building of the University of Washington Seattle campus. The intended installation will serve both as an ancillary source of electrical power and a heat gain control measure on the building envelope. The BIPV panels will also be highly visible and showcase UW as a steward in sustainable construction.

Primary Contact:
Stefanie Young
sy10@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $9,220
Funding Received:
 2011-2012
Project Status:

Executive Summary

The purpose of this project is to accomplish the following goals:
1) Improve the quality of surface water flowing from the UW campus
2) Advance student engagement in stormwater design, implementation, and education
3) Provide a demonstration for UW engineering and transportation services in addressing stormwater 
issues

In order to accomplish these objectives, HSS has divided them into two phases. Phase One comprises of “Feasibility Study” to be conducted in the Winter quarter of 2012.

Proposed Project (Phase One): HSS proposes a feasibility study to develop a stormwater design and identify the key bureaucratic paths for implementing a stormwater treatment bioswale. Through this process, HSS will develop several alternatives (three to four) for a bioswale, assessing each alternative’s feasibility in implementation, educational capacity, and cost. 
HSS has collaborated with UW staff in Transportation Services, Engineering Services, and Capital Projects Office in identifying sites that improve water quality, are visible to the UW student-body, and advance green infrastructure opportunities on the UW campus. Sites that fulfill this criteria have been identified 
in and around UW campus parking lots.

Proposed Project (Phase Two): Phase Two will fund the implementation and construction of designs outlined in Phase One. HSS plans to finalize the expected construction costs in Phase One, but we anticipate the cost of construction for an improved stormwater facility to be approximately $50,000- $60,000.

Primary Contact:
Patrick Green
ptgreen@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $75,000
Funding Received:
 2011-2012
Project Status:

Executive Summary

Proposed Project (Phase Two): Phase Two funds the implementation and construction of designs outlined in Phase One. As of April 2nd, 2012 the design review process of this project is still underway. Specifically, the four alternative designs developed by HSS are being reviewed by a committee of stakeholders, including Kristine Kenney (UW Landscape Architect), Howard Nakase (UW Grounds Shop), Jim Morin (UW Engineering Services), Peter Dewey (UW Transportation Services). This team advises HSS on aesthetic, engineering, and construction feasibility and assists in obtaining approval of the design.

Because the design review is currently taking place, HSS cannot propose a total cost of the project. In
contrast, HSS proposes a cost limit that guides its design development process.

This project accomplishes the following goals: 

  1. Improve the quality of surface water flowing from the UW campus; 
  2. Advance student engagement in stormwater design, implementation, and education; 
  3. Provide a demonstration for UW engineering and transportation services in addressing stormwater issues. 

Husky Sustainable Storms (HSS) requested $9,220 in the first round of CSF funding for 2012 to implement a feasibility study for a bioswale that remediates stormwater from a UW parking lot. HSS developed four alternatives for a bioswale, assessing each alternative’s feasibility in implementation, educational capacity, and cost. Phase One is scheduled for completion in mid-April 2012. 

 

Primary Contact:
Patrick Green
ptgreen@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $11,379
Funding Received:
 2015-2016
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Floating wetlands are an emerging green technology that mimic naturally occurring wetlands by using floating frames as a base upon which to grow native wetland plants.  Across the globe, floating wetlands have been deployed with positive results in carbon sequestration; reduction of metals and pollutants; climate adaptation and water temperature mitigation; habitat renewal; and shoreline protection and beautification. 

The UW Floating Wetlands Project looks to adapt this technology to the Puget Sound ecosystem for use in the shorelines adjacent to the University of Washington in order to expand wetland vegetation, rebuild salmonid habitat, and mitigate pollutants.  Through engagement across a number of UW departments including Landscape Architecture, Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, Environmental Science and Forestry, and Engineering, as well as outreach to institutional, city, and county permitting agencies, this phase of the project will establish the feasibility of floating wetland implementation along the UW shoreline and create an actionable plan for future deployment.  

Primary Contact:
Kasia Keeley
gflab@uw.edu

An Huynh
Amount Awarded:
 $465
Funding Received:
 2011-2012
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

We are looking to implement a rainwater harvesting system on the UW Farm for farm use and campus wide education. This system would be located beside the Burke-Gilman on the UW Farm and will be installed on a renovated sign roof. We estimate this project to cost $465.00, and is estimated to save approximately 250 gallons of water per year. This project is designed to educate people on rainwater harvesting as well as inspire them to imagine future capabilities.Our small system has the ability to save around 250 gallons of water per year. This information is based off of a 15sq. ft. roof and 36 inches of annual rainfall; our formula accounted for the fact that only approximately 70% of the water would be harvested.

Primary Contact:
Erica Isomura
isomura@uw.edu

Martha Moritz
Amount Awarded:
 $78,637
Funding Received:
 2011-2012
Project Status:
In progress, accepting volunteers

Executive Summary

Grounds Management of the UW Seattle Campus implemented a green waste composting program; waste that currently goes to Cedar Grove will be composted and used on-site to maintain the soil health of the UW landscape. Benefits of this program will include long term cost savings, greenhouse gas emissions avoided, student opportunities for engagement and leadership and composted material will be available to campus organizations, such as the UW Farm, SEED and UW Botanic Gardens. Estimated total cost is $153,637.00 and the compost committee is requesting $78,637 from the Campus Sustainability Fund, with the rest of the costs being matched by Grounds Management.

Primary Contact:
Hillary Burgess
hkb10@uw.edu

An Huynh
Amount Awarded:
 $3,085
Funding Received:
 2011-2012
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

This project will build on the success of an earlier CSF project that installed five bicycle repair stations on campus by installing two additional Dero Fixits at strategic locations on campus. The new repair stations will allow students, employees, and visitors to fill their tires and perform basic repairs quickly, effectively removing maintenance and uncertainty as barriers to bicycling.

Repair stations will be installed in the Marine Studies/John Wallace Hall building cluster and at residence halls along Whitman Court. These areas were not served in the first round of installations but have since requested repair stations.

Phase 1 of this project initially proposed ten repair stations but was scaled back to five at the recommendation of the CSF selection committee. This was so we could gain experience with the repair stations on campus and see how they would be received by students and employees. Because they have been so well-received and heavily utilized, expanding to the remaining areas of campus is prudent.

To measure this project’s success, a student intern will conduct user counts and a satisfaction intercept survey at each of the new and existing locations once the new equipment has been installed. We will also monitor visits to the Repair Station website and track emails and press related to the repair stations.

The project will be coordinated with UW Housing & Food Services (for installations at residence halls), the University Landscape Architect, Maintenance & Alterations, and Commuter Services.

Primary Contact:
David Amiton
damiton@uw.edu

UW Farm
Amount Awarded:
 $78,307
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The UW Farm is applying for $80,000 to support its expansion on ground near the Center for Urban Horticulture. This expansion will allow us to meet our goals of developing community (in UW and beyond), building connections (between people, land, and our future) and achieving a more sustainable food system. In its expansion, the farm will provide the campus with sustainably grown produce through programs such as a student-run cooperative kitchen, dining facilities run by Housing and Food Services (HFS), and donations to local food banks.

The expanded farm will serve as a tool in academic curricula spanning numerous disciplines from anthropology to biology to urban planning. And most importantly, the new farm will make a permanent, positive contribution to the University of Washington and to the city of Seattle.

With support from the CSF, we will expand our practice to an additional full acre of land on campus, adjacent to the Center for Urban Horticulture. Expanding the production capacity of the UW Farm will allow us to amplify our contribution to the UW‟s sustainability mission in several ways. First, it will enable us to solidify a relationship with Housing and Food Services (HFS). HFS is interested in purchasing farm produce to use in campus dining halls and small cafeterias. Second, the UW Student Food Cooperative will be operating in full capacity next year, running a cafe space in the South Campus Center and a food cart for Red Square. They plan to source a substantial amount of their produce from the UW Farm. A strong relationship with the Student Food Cooperative will help generate awareness on campus about the social, economic, and political issues surrounding food, from farm-to-table. Third, we will create a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program, which will teach farmers tangible and realistic business skills associated with the production of food.

Primary Contact:
Nina Arlein
theuwfarm@gmail.com
Amount Awarded:
 $500
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

We will host nationally renowned author and farmer Dan Imhoff speak about the 2012 Farm Bill.

The environmental problem we want to solve is lack of student awareness and involvement in the Farm Bill and in overall issues of land use and food. By engaging students in action around the Farm Bill, they will also be more knowledgeable and capable of action about food on the UW campus.

ABOUT THE FARM BILL: The Farm Bill is perhaps the single most significant land use legislation enacted in the United States, yet many citizens remain unaware of its power and scope. With subsidies ballooning toward $25 billion dollars per year, the Farm Bill largely dictates who grows what crops, on what acreage, and under what conditions--all with major impacts on the country's rural economies, health and nutrition, national security, and biodiversity. As debate and wrangling over the 2012 Farm Bill intensifies, Dan Imhoff will offer a highly informative and engaging overview of the legislation that literally shapes our food system, our bodies, and our future.

We will host speaker Dan Imhoff on March 1st for a campus-wide speaking event. In addition to the main event, there will be opportunities for students (those coordinating the event and also those active in food issues on campus) to have more intimate conversations with him at a dinner party. Professors may also be able to host him in class. Dan will be linking Farm Bill discussion to talk about how students can engage on their campus in food issues.

Here is how the NW Farm Action Bill describes the event:
The Northwest Farm Bill Action Group invites you to come to learn about local efforts to organize for a more just Food Bill! The NW Farm Bill Action Group is undertaking innovative research and outreach efforts to help those wanting to shape the next Food and Farm Bill.

Primary Contact:
Travis English
tme99@uw.edu
Amount Awarded:
 $250
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The U.S. produces almost 600 billion pounds of food each year and a 25-50% of it is wasted — left in fields, thrown out at the grocery store, left in the fridge until it spoils, or scraped into the garbage at the end of a meal.

Wasted food costs farmers, consumers and businesses hundreds of billions of dollars every year, and the environmental costs are just as steep. It is estimated that 2% of all U.S. energy consumption goes into producing food that is ultimately thrown out. Because America’s energy economy remains highly dependent on fossil fuels, this translates into significant unnecessary greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, food that is discarded in landfills creates methane emissions, itself a potent greenhouse gas.

As an institutional provider of dining and food services, food waste is an issue for the University of Washington. And all members of the UW community are affected by the environmental, social and economic consequences of food waste.

The panelists at this event will discuss the problems associated with food waste, as well as the solutions. The approaches to be discussed follow the same “Reduce/Reuse/Recycle” paradigm as other waste prevention strategies. Food waste can first be reduced through programs that help food producers and food retailers better understand and efficiently meet demand without excess. When there is excess food, it can be reused or reallocated through food rescue programs and other services that match food surpluses with those in need. Finally, food waste that cannot be avoided, such as inedible components or post-consumer food scraps, can be recycled into a useful soil amendment through composting, or turned into electricity or biogas through anaerobic digestion.

Panelists will discuss how these solutions are being employed here in Seattle, including on the University of Washington campus, and throughout the U.S.

Primary Contact:
McKenna Morrigan
morrigan@uw.edu

www.amazon.com
Amount Awarded:
 $295
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

We will be playing the movie "TAPPED" in the residence hall to inform people about drinking water & the nature.

By playing the movie TAPPED, we hope to address the issue of bottle of water and its impact on the environment. It would be an interesting experience for many people since it is a topic that does not get discuss in depth in people’s lives. It provides intriguing information about bottle of water and could raise people’s awareness about the issue. By watching this movie, people have a chance to evaluate their usage of bottle of water if any and potentially make a change and take some actions in their lives regarding to the issue. Their change in behavior will make our environment a better place. 

Primary Contact:
Martin Su
msu6@uw.edu

An Huynh
Amount Awarded:
 $1,477
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

This project is being run by the Husky Neighborhood Assistants, an organization run out of the University of Washington’s Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards that works with students to work on issues in the greater University District Community. The tree project is meant to beautify the neighborhood, improve the canopy habitat, improve water drainage in the planter strips, and to provide students both as residents at planting sites and as volunteers at the planting event an opportunity to connect with nature in the urban environment.

Primary Contact:
Kyle Murphy
--

US Green Building Council
Amount Awarded:
 $14,080
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) LEED rating and certification program for buildings emphasizes energy efficiency through conservation and innovative technologies. Points toward certification are earned on the basis of designed building performance compared to a baseline model. While there are performance models for all LEED buildings, there is currently no comparison of predicted results with actual performance for the University's LEED projects. In order to have an effective adaptive management approach to capital projects at the University, this comparison must be made. Interns will be hired to perform the energy use analyses of University LEED-certified buildings and other capital projects. The project will entail the collection of actual energy performance data for the University’s completed LEED projects, and the predicted performance data for planned projects. Other comparisons of design baselines to actual performance will be included in this position (i.e., water, product performance comparison, etc.). Creation and maintenance of a database from this information will serve as the basis for evaluation of the effectiveness of LEED building standards on campus as well as the efficiency of other renovations and new constructions. Case studies will be developed, posted on the CPO website, and linked to other sites across the University domain.

The interns will work in the Capital Projects Office, and fall under the guidance of the Sustainability Manager, Clara Simon. The internship will be open to any student with a suitable educational background and personal interest, and will be available for four quarters, preferably filled by a new student each quarter. Priority will be given to students in a Capstone or similar program, so that the results of their efforts are shared  with other students via a student-designed presentation. Advertising of this opportunity to the College of the Environment and College of Built Environments will make this emphasis clear.

Primary Contact:
Clara Simon
simonch@u.washington.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $7,237
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

In order to encourage bicycle commuting, Commuter Services intends to install DIY bicycle repair stands across campus with the goal of eliminating maintenance and uncertainty barriers to bicycling. These fix-it stations would allow students to perform minor bicycle maintenance and repairs quickly and conveniently while on campus. The predicted effect of this project would be an increase in cycling on campus due to the removal of barriers to bicycling.The long-term goals of this project are to reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with driving, minimize negative impacts of congestion around the University, and create safe transportation options for students at the University of Washington.

In order to maximize the benefits of this project, Commuter Services will work with an intern whose position will be dedicated to assisting in project development and reaching out to the campus community and raising awareness about this new piece of campus infrastructure. Some of the activities the intern will be involved in will include creating a Google-powered fix-it station map, advertising the new tool to the campus community in multiple mediums, and working with various student groups to ensure that the benefits of this product are widespread around the University community; including increased visibility of the ASUW Bike Shop, University of Washington Commuter Services, and other bicycle-related interests on campus.

 

Primary Contact:
David Amiton
damiton@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $1,000
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Our goal is to incorporate several owl nesting boxes on conifer trees located near Denny Field, William H. Gates Law Library, and the Union Bay Natural Area. Through a physical survey of campus, we found specific trees in these areas that meet the necessary criteria for barn owl habitat. The boxes will be anchored to the trees using rings that will wrap around the circumference of the trunk, and can be loosened periodically to accommodate the growth of the tree. It is our hope that within two years, one or more barn owls will encounter these boxes and take up residence on campus. We chose barn owls because they are commonly found in the Pacific Northwest, provide natural pest control, can easily live in human-modified environments, and they are a dynamic “charismatic mega-fauna” that will add complexity to biodiversity at UW. According to our panel of experts Kristine Kenny of the UW Landscape and Architecture, Heather Swift of Cohabitats, and Charles Easterberg of the UW Sanitarian, we would have a better chance of attracting an owl if we put up more than just four boxes. To get a head start and increase our chances, we would like to put up ten boxes.

Primary Contact:
Jessica Kang
tsmaniac@uw.edu
Amount Awarded:
 $12,203
Funding Received:
 2010-2011
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

This behavior change project focuses on student composting.  The main objective of this project is to identify perceived motivations and barriers the campus community has to composting, and determine what communication methods on signs are most effective in fostering behavior change.  The results of this project will be valuable to Housing and Food Services (HFS), Building Services, and student and staff led groups such as SEED and Green Teams that spend significant resources on campus signage, without studying the effectiveness of their communication methods. In the long-term, this project will contribute to increased composting on campus, which will reduce carbon emissions and waste.

Primary Contact:
Daniel Brody
dobb14@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $85,000
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

UW-Solar is a student led organization developing a solar installation with an accompanying industrial control system; planned to be installed on a Housing and Food Service residence hall on the University of Washington Seattle campus. UW-Solar will be providing effective outreach to students about the benefits of smart solar systems. There were five potential sites for the installation and we have currently narrowed down the selection to Lander, Mercer Building A, and Poplar buildings.

We are asking for $85,000 dollars for the pilot project. This is in addition to the money we have received from CSF for the feasibility study.

Currently there are 13 students participating. They represent five Schools, five Departments, two campuses within the University of Washington system and they range from undergraduate to Ph.D. level students. 

Primary Contact:
Stefanie Young
sy10@uw.edu

http://www.atmos.washington.edu/directions-ATG/ATG_lawn.jpg
Amount Awarded:
 $7,776
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

Many of us will have noticed that the lights in communal areas of UW buildings often get left on even after the last person in the area has left. This wastage is likely to occur overnight, at weekends and over holidays.  We propose to install motion activated light switches in the corridors of 6 floors of the Atmospheric Sciences building (ATG Building), which will switch off automatically after a specified amount of time if no motion is detected. If someone walks into the area then the lights will switch back on in that area. We present a solution based on switches and sensors that communicate wirelessly, which eliminates the need for extra wiring to connect the motion sensors and the lighting circuit. The technology is well-proven and installation is straightforward.

Several environmental problems stem from electricity wastage. Washington State generates most of its electricity from hydroelectric power. Therefore, the energy savings from this project will help improve stream and river flows for endangered species such as salmon. The electricity savings are likely to have a significant future environmental impact since reduction of electricity usage at the point of use is recognized as one of the most effective ways of scaling back energy generation requirements at the power plant level due to the large loss of energy in transmission. With a growing population Seattle will need to increase efficiency in order to meet future needs using renewables.

We estimate that our scheme could prevent over 16,000 kWh of electricity usage annually, which is enough to power a student bedroom (approximated at 3 kWh per day) for almost 15 years. This wastage costs the university almost $1000 a year, which is money that could be used in productive ways. Scaled to the whole campus the wastage is very large indeed. We intend to install light monitoring devices that will enable us to log when the lights have been turned off by the system and thus allow us to quantify the exact amount of electricity saved and also to estimate any potential effects of switching on the lifetimes of the bulbs.

The estimated cost of the project, including materials, labor, taxes, advertisement and outreach costs is $7775.74. However, we calculate that due to the electricity savings, the full project costs will be recouped after only 8 years. If considering only materials and labor (i.e. without outreach, etc. costs), this is reduced to only 6.1 years.

The project will be led by Dr. Daniel Grosvenor (UW research Associate, Atmospheric Sciences) and Prof. Robert Wood (faculty Associate Professor, Atmospheric Sciences). They will also act as student mentors for 3-4 students who will be involved in the project. One of these was involved in writing this proposal.

Primary Contact:
Dr. Daniel Grosvenor
danpg@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $9,000
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

This project seeks to meet two objectives.  First, it will directly measure the efficacy of two new systems of solid waste management offered by UW Recycling by directly quantifying the benefits of these systems in a devoted case study.  Second, it seeks to use the results of these efforts as a means of advocating for administrative and user-based change in solid waste management at UW.

Efforts to address the first goal will be undertaken through a detailed study of Denny Hall’s waste stream.  This work will begin by characterizing the efficiency of the current system of waste disposal in Denny.  Importantly, this system does not currently provide compost bins, and this is a major problem since 1) composting is a more sustainable waste-disposal strategy than landfilling, 2) composting is cheaper per ton of waste than landfilling ($55 versus $145), 3) the UW sends about 4990 annual tons of waste to landfills (costing about $1.3 million annually), and 4) previous work shows that most of what UW sends to landfills is compostable.  Next, UW Recycling will install two systems designed to improve the efficiency of solid waste collection – and composting in particular – in Denny Hall; these systems are the MiniMax system and restroom paper towel composting.  The second half of this work will then measure whether these systems improve Denny’s waste efficiency, including improvements in both sustainability and financial expense.  Results will then be reported to UW Recycling to aid this office in convincing buildings across the UW campus to adopt these systems.

Efforts to address the second goal will be undertaken through a broad program of student involvement and project outreach efforts.  These efforts will include diverse student participation in the project proper, as well as the dissemination of results to students through social media and our website, an educational video, campus events, collaboration with student environmental groups, and presentation of results and insights to a broad range of UW classes.

This project will be conducted by the University of Washington Garbology Project (UWGP; uwgarbology.weebly.com), a student-led initiative operating in partnership with UW Recycling and the UW Anthropology.  In carrying out this project, we will draw upon the resources of these offices as well as existing ties with the Burke Museum, UW Housing and Food Services, the UW Program on the Environment, SEED, SAGE, Eco Reps, the Environmental Stewardship Committee, UW Bothell, and Shoreline Community College.  Lastly, a portion of the funding requested will support dedicated efforts to expand our network of connections as a means of increasing the positive campus-wide impacts of the proposed project.

We are requesting a total of $9000 to conduct this project.  The majority of this money ($6000) will be devoted to hiring two students as part-time employees devoted to managing project analysis and outreach efforts.  The remainder will be devoted to materials and supplies needed to implement the proposed systems in Denny Hall, conduct waste analysis efficiently, cleanly, and safely, and support outreach efforts.

Primary Contact:
Jack Johnson
anamgorm@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $5,000
Funding Received:
 2011-2012
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

The University of Washington is well recognized as a leader in sustainability among public college campuses, with our students leading the way in innovating new ways to better this image. However, you wouldn’t know it by looking around the UW’s various sustainability websites. We need a landing place that showcases, in an engaging, marketable way, the projects and efforts of our campus community to make our campus a greener place.

Working with the Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability office’s new Snapshots project, I would like to fill this hole. Using my storytelling, management, and multimedia skills, my project would create professional quality photos, videos, podcasts and written pieces showcasing our students’, faculty’s and staff's ongoing efforts to cultivate the culture of sustainability, eco-awareness, and environmental progress on our campus. I am asking for a small grant of $5,000 dollars in exchange for the time and effort of myself and others to create this content and construct a new brand for UW’s sustainability.

 

Primary Contact:
Lucas Anderson
mandlbrt@uw.edu

Amount Awarded:
 $4,500
Funding Received:
 2012-2013
Project Status:
Completed

Executive Summary

UW-Solar is a student led organization developing a solar installation with an accompanying Industrial Control System; planned to be installed on a Housing and Food Service residence hall on the University of Washington Seattle Campus. UW-Solar will be providing effective outreach to students about the benefits of smart solar systems.

Currently there are 11 students participating. They represent 5 Schools, 5 Departments, 2 campuses within the University of Washington system and they range from undergrads to Ph.D. level students.
 

Primary Contact:
Stefanie Young
sy10@uw.edu