Keraton 2020 by ISAUW

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $10,000

Letter of Intent:

Letter of Intent

To whom it may concern,

 

ISAUW is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural organization dedicated to promoting the

diverse Indonesian culture to the communities in the Greater Seattle area. ISAUW’s vision is to become the leading Indonesian Student Association. This can be achieved through building a respectful, well-rounded, diverse, yet nationalistic young Indonesian community in the Greater Seattle Area as well as in the United States. Established for over 10 years, ISAUW would like to carry on and improve the legacy of our previous years and the most successful Keraton Indonesian Festival to date.

 

Keraton is the largest Indonesian cultural event in the West Coast and second largest in the United States. Over the past few years, Keraton has experienced high growth culminating in last year’s event that attracted over 10,000 people. ISAUW expects 12,000 visitors and will be showcasing the diversity of Indonesia’s many islands through traditional food, dance, music and art. ISAUW’s purpose is not limited to entertaining and educating people in the community about Indonesia, rather it is also to create a memorable Indonesian experience. This year, we are planning to have a coffee-tasting booth, batik awareness and creation booth, as well as many more booths designed to enrich the visitors’ knowledge about Indonesia. With this, ISAUW would like to apply for CSF funding to make Keraton possible yet again this year.

 

Keraton has always had a target budget of 40,000 – 50,000$ and this year we estimate it to be around 44,500$. Throughout the years, we have gotten sponsors from reputable businesses both in Seattle and our own home country, Indonesia. Typically, companies in Indonesia sponsor us in the 1000 – 3000$ range and we are proud to have companies such as Indofood, Blibli and Delowill, to name a few, who have supported us for consecutive years. In Seattle itself we have also receive support from Twelve apartments, South East Asian center, Wells Fargo and several more who sponsored us in the 1000 – 2000$ range. Last but not the least, we have also been financially supported by UW’s communities such as ASUW & HUB.

 

ISAUW guarantees CSF that Keraton has always delivered a sustainable impact and promotes leadership as well as student involvement, education about the Indonesian culture, outreach and positive behavior change. Last but certainly not least, throughout the years Keraton has taught our members important life skills such as accountability, teamwork and respect.

 

Sustainable impact: In terms of social sustainability, Keraton promotes volunteerism and community engagement, both ISAUW members tasked with planning Keraton and our visitors. Assembling for this event annually, ISAUW has created multiple opportunities for volunteering as well as engaging the Greater Seattle community to make this event possible. The aim of  Keraton is to the build awareness of Indonesian culture and showcase the diversity of the University of Washington. ISAUW members are also highly concerned about the environment thus making environmental sustainability a top priority for our organization. Following the events of the past two years, Keraton is to be held in an outdoor location, Rainer Vista, where it would attempt to utilize less energy compared to an indoor space. This location would also be accessible for Metro users, as well as people who choose to attend by bikes with there being available bike racks. Moreover, ISAUW can assure CSF that our Keraton is 99% compostable as we require all of Keraton’s food vendors to use compostable and sustainable supplies of packaging and limit food waste, and we would also reduce waste by providing recycling, composting and landfill bins to collect waste. Hence, through Keraton, ISAUW is able to showcase and educate the community in Seattle about the diverse Indonesian Culture. Through the celebration of Indonesian Culture at Keraton, ISAUW is able to empower and educate the Seattle-lite community paving the way for empowerment, equity and inclusion which are foundational for social sustainability.

 

Leadership and student involvement: Throughout the years, ISAUW has always put huge emphasis on creating leaders. The large commitment expected of our members prepare them for real life work experiences. Not only are they involved in initiating events to promote the Indonesian culture, members are also involved in marketing communication, information technology, creativity management and many more. In terms of Keraton, the volunteers ISAUW receive are also students from community colleges and universities in the Greater Seattle Area, including Edmonds Community College, Shoreline Community College, Bellevue Community College and more. Moreover, almost half of the food vendors in Keraton are contributed by other Student Organization Bodies from various Community Colleges and Universities, such as The Indonesian Student Association of Seattle University (ISASU), Bellevue Indonesian Club (BIC), ISANS (Indonesian Student Association of North Seattle College) and more. Hence, ISAUW members can expand their channels and meet new people from various different backgrounds, as well as creating new experiences for students which would be useful for their future endeavors.  

 

Education, outreach and behavior change: Keraton has always received critical acclaim from Indonesians who attend Keraton as well as non-Indonesians who felt that they took home knowledge about Indonesia from Keraton. Beyond that, ISAUW members have also been more active in the campus community as we enlist their collaboration and help while preparing for Keraton.

 

Feasibility and Accountability: As mentioned above, ISAUW members take on big roles and are expected to fulfill them. As ISAUW officers we encourage them to continuously showcase their project management skills. Members in different departments have to work together to achieve the vision and mission of the organization. They complete numerous challenging tasks, engage with real professionals and are also committed to lobbying for funds put into Keraton, allocate the fund appropriately and use it as wisely as possible to make the execution of Keraton successful.

 

Key Stakeholders and Core project team

 

Key stakeholders

  • Local Communities
  • Non-profit organizations
  • Registered Student organizations
  • University of Washington
  • Business partners, suppliers and vendors
  • Organization members
  • Volunteers
  • International and local students in Seattle

 

Core Project Team

  • Finance: Sponsorship and Treasury
  • Operations: Event Organizer, Creativity Management, Inventory
  • Communication outreach: Information technology, Marketing communication, Design & Documentation

 

Project Timeline

**Attached in Email

 

 

Estimation of Project Budget

** Attached in email

 

 

Primary Contact information

ISAUW Director of Finance 2019-2020

Name: Sharon Jane

Contact number: +1-206-2356418

Email: sharonj7@uw.edu

 

Secondary Contact information

 

ISAUW President 2019-2020

Name: Catherine Hartono

Contact number: +1-425-440-1278

Email: hartonoc@uw.edu

 

 

 

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Sharon Jane
Supplementary Documents:

Self-compassion workshop pilot for first year students who are also parents

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,500

Letter of Intent:

Our goal is to develop online content for the UW First Year Programs website that shares information about self-compassionate parenting in the transition to college. Content will be focused on parenting skills supportive of self-compassionate responses to challenges, grounded in the three core components of self-compassion: mindfulness, connection to a common humanity, and self-kindness. Specifically, we seek to address the following two aims: 

Aim 1. Material development. In partnership with University of Washington students and parents, we will develop a single session group behavioral intervention for parents of entering undergraduate students that addresses parenting behaviors supportive of student self-compassion in the transition to college.

Aim 2. Pilot evaluation. Conduct a pilot effectiveness-implementation evaluation of the materials. Mixed methods data collection will be employed, with all parents completing pre- and post-session surveys, and a subset of parents participating in qualitative interviews about their experience. Data will inform subsequent adaptations and broaderdissemination and evaluation. We will use this data to determine whether adaptation to different formats (e.g., online delivery for parents unable to attend the in-person Parent Orientation) is appropriate.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: LeAnne Jones Wiles

Trauma informed mindfulness training

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $2,250

Letter of Intent:

The UW Center for Child and Family Well-Being (CCFW) has invited David Treleaven to facilitate a one-day workshop on trauma-informed mindfulness practices. David is a writer and educator working at the intersection of mindfulness and trauma who has worked with universities including University of California Los Angeles, Brown University, University of Massachusetts, and University of California San Diego. Through workshops, keynotes, podcasts, and online education, David focuses on offering mindfulness providers with the knowledge and tools they require to meet the needs of those struggling with trauma. His work comes from research based on making mindfulness safe and effective for people who haveexperienced trauma, as well as his own lived experience. This training is timely to the University of Washington as the university has seen an increase in student demand for mental health service provision and access to care. From Fall 2017 and Fall 2018, the Counseling Center saw a 70% increase in the number of students seeking a crisis counselor.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Megan Kennedy

eBook of the stories and experiences of students of color at UW

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,450

Letter of Intent:

Our project aligns with the UN Sustainable Development Goals of good health and well-being, quality education, reduced inequalities, and peace, justice, and strong institutions. Mental health is important and is challenging to prioritize when in school, as other responsibilities seem to take precedence. We want to share these stories to uplift students and let them know that they are not alone when they experience challenges or setbacks that impact their education. We want to help students spread positivity, understanding, community, and most importantly, support. In addition, all students are deserving of a quality education and a big part of learning how to cultivate quality for students is to hear from them. Stories are data, and they are key to piecing together the whole picture of how students of color navigate the University of Washington. This can in turn help the University see where and how there is room for improvement. Improvement can then lead to reduced inequalities.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Erica Mullett

Healing spaces heat map

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $750

Letter of Intent:

The proposed method to address this question is to create a heat density map highlighting where people identify as a healing space for them on campus. I want to administer a mapping survey where students, faculty and staff are able to identify places on campus where they seek refuge during the work/school day, before and after their time spent here. This type of survey data can then be aggregated to create a specific map. I will also aim to ask questions for how people are using the space itself. This will give UW facilities some indication around what's being done in a particular space, the frequency of useand why it’s significant to certain people. This survey could also be administered over the course of an academic school year, or seasonal cycle, to identify where individuals seek refuge during particularseasons. If students, faculty and staff indicate being inside for a large portion of winter, we could make the move to combat seasonal depression by improving lighting, life in a space and the feeling of an indoor space to be more healing as indicated by biophilic design philosophy.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kaleb Germinaro

Diversity Includes Disability

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $2,390

Letter of Intent:

The project will bring people together at an event where it’s safe to share opinions, generate ideas to improve the campus culture, and learn new concepts. Since the existence of disability is a normal part of the human experience, and most of us will be impacted by disability in our lifetime (in ourselves, our family, our friends and colleagues) the project seeks to embrace both the common humanity and diversity around us. The events, knowledge base article, and supported replications will further campus understanding of disability identity and that diversity includes disability.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Scott Bellman

QTPOC Healing in the Outdoors

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $2,000

Letter of Intent:

This project aims to provide a safe healing space as well as a space to strengthen community for Queer and Trans people of color (QTPOC) through a 2 night 3 day camping trip in the North Cascades National Park. Queer and trans people of color have been historically excluded from spaces such as the outdoors and through this project we aim to connect the QTPOC community with the outdoors. Many studies have shown the incredibly positive emotional and physical effects that being outdoors has—especially in places like the North Cascades— on someone’s health and wellbeing. Access to the outdoors is incredibly exclusive and only easily accessible by certain groups such as wealthy white families and particularly white cis men. Within the Queer community we face oppressive structures day to day and often that is physically and emotionally exhausting. The idea of chosen family with the Queer community, especially the QTPOC community is incredibly important and for many the QTPOC community is their chosen family. Being outdoors and being able to step back from our daily lives can be incredibly grounding. We will engage in community building and healing activities such as day hikes, reflective journaling, edible native plant lessons, and other naturalist activities. The aim of this project is to provide a place where members of the UW QTPOC community can come together, heal together, and build community with each other. Overall this trip is meant to be grounding and reflective and ultimately helps in connecting members of the QTPOC community to the outdoors

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Reb Zhou

Capillaries: The Journal of Narrative Medicine

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $2,574

Letter of Intent:

Capillaries works within the genre of narrative medicine, a movement which invites healthcare providers and patients to reflect on their experiences using writing and art and to develop appreciation for the inherent humanity in all people. We are expanding awareness of and participation in narrative medicine at UW, encouraging undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and staff –from all departments, not just in medicine –to share their stories with us. Since February 2018, we have worked towards reducing the stigma against discussing mental health, shame, disordered eating, suicide, sexual assault, and our most vulnerable and often silenced experiences. We have also sought to uplift the voices of populations marginalized by our fractured healthcare system by collaborating with the Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education, Research, and Practice (CHSIE), the UW School of Medicine’s Narrative Medicine Interest Group, and the Seattle-King County Clinic. Thus far, we have produced four quarterly publications, each with more pieces submitted than the last. This increase in submissions indicates the need for a permanently available space to engage with narratives of diverse healing processes. We look forward to serving as this much needed space in the 2019-2020 academic year. We will be gathering stories for Autumn 2019, Winter 2020, and Spring 2020 publications and will share these narratives with the greater community through an updated website, print copies of the journal, and at our quarterly open-mic events.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Alice Ranjan

Many Voices: A Storytelling Toolkit for Community-based Oral History Projects

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,675

Letter of Intent:

This project will utilize low-cost and open-source technologies such as the Raspberry Pi single-board computer and near-field communication to create a modular interactive exhibit for use by oral history projects. Inspired by other community-based oral history kiosks, this project will expand on their work to create a ready-to-install software package with accompanying modular kiosk designs so that any oral history or public history organization can create an interactive exhibit that features their work with very little monetary investment. The kiosk will be designed with equity in mind, from wheelchair accessibility and transcripts, to braille and sensory considerations. Its modular design would allow for a degree of mobility to assist with outreach at libraries, schools or conferences. As part of our prioritization of accessibility, we will aim to lower the technical knowledge requirements necessary to reproduce and maintain this model, creating a software package that is not only easy to access, but easy to use. The digital package will be made freely available online, including the core Raspberry Pi operating system image, plans for a kiosk and a manual. This will be the first phase of a larger project planned at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, exploring new ways to share narratives surrounding the Hanford Nuclear Development Site and peoples affected by plutonium processing, including radiation exposure during production, storage, and purposeful releases into the atmosphere. For decades, communities across Washington and worldwide have been affected by the radioactive materials processed at Hanford. From the downwind farmers, Indigenous tribes of Eastern Washington and Hanford Site workers, to those affected by bombs containing plutonium refined at Hanford that were dropped in the Marshall Islands and Japan, the stories of peoples affected by radiation provide valuable lessons about ethical science, environmental conservation, and public health crises. Creating new venues to amplify these voices can help promote healing and understanding, as well as the missions and educational goals of the Burke Museum and the University of Washington.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Dillon Connelly

Mapping for the Wellbeing of UW

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $750

Letter of Intent:

The project is going to be dope. Being able to better understand how folks at UW use space, and especially what elements and factors within a space draw them to use a particular space can tell us a lot about the ways in which UW can strive to be more healing. Through research we know and understand how valuable nature and place are, and we don't know what is important to the people using uw's campus quite yet.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kaleb Germinaro

Resilience and Urban Sustainability in Public Writing Partnerships

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $3,000

Letter of Intent:

UW-Seattle’s Expository Writing Program (EWP) helps prepare over 5000 students each year with critical literacy, research, writing, and communication capacities that are essential for successful participation across the academy and in public life. Our program seeks to help students engage in writing as a means of social action; develop ethical communication practices; and understand and be responsible for the consequences of language use for diverse communities. Building on our program’s longstanding history of engaging undergraduate students in public and community-based writing courses, we will develop and pilot courses that engage the City of Seattle’s Race & Social Justice and Equity & Environment Initiatives. These public writing courses will ground conversations on urban equity and environmental sustainability within collaborative writing and research projects, some of which will be co-designed with local organizations working to address various interrelated issues, such as housing affordability, environmental justice, education, food security, and transportation in Seattle. Developing the creative and critical problem-solving capacities required to respond to such public problems calls for tremendous resilience and emotional strength, as well as interdisciplinary academic knowledges and other wisdoms. Our pilot coursework will be designed to help support such capacities. Our team also plans to offer a workshop for the UW teaching community on our collaboration.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Candice Rai

Neah Bay Telling Our Stories: Imagining Our Futures

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $3,000

Letter of Intent:

This collaborative project is built on a longstanding partnership between UW’s Pipeline Project and Neah Bay Elementary School and has been developed to address a community-identified need. The result is an exciting project that will focuses on encouraging Neah Bay students to envision their futures. The goal will be to not only have Native students see themselves pursuing higher education, but learning, as early as fifth grade, of career paths that could ensure their being able to live and thrive in Neah Bay after graduation. The 2019-2020 UW Team is made up of predominately First Nation students who wil be leading this project.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Christine Stickler

RepairCycle

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $3,000

Letter of Intent:

The RepairCycle is a mobile, on-the-spot garment mending service and experience that brings the UW (and Seattle) community together around the universal aspect of clothing—offering a functional service while creating connection and dialogue through a shared activity. By empowering creative and easy-to-learn mending skills, we are working to transform our local community’s relationship with clothing. Ultimately, we believe that garment repair is not just a viable option, but should a delightfully designed experience.

Circular Textiles: There is no straightforward way to recycle textiles. The result is one garbage truck of textiles wasted every second, or 92 million tons of solid waste dumped into landfills every year. Disrupting this wasteful cycle and a disposable mindset means taking a long, hard look at the psychology of fashion. Simply put, we need to invest in services and skills that empower us to wear and enjoy the clothing we already own for longer. Which inevitably means, catalyzing a culture of garment repair.

Transforming Trailer: The RepairCycle bicycle trailer is the foundation for service and events. The cart’s interior is a simple box with a sturdy floor that can fit a variety of configured elements. The trailer’s top unfolds to provide ample, collaborative mending and learning space. The hinged cabinet on the back of the of the trailer detaches, offering room to display educational and event materials, as well as easy-to-access materials storage.

Upcoming Events: Generous support from the UW Resilience Lab Seed Fund will sponsor our 2019-2020 RepairCycle tour and brand. The team will host repair services & creative mending workshops at events across all three UW campuses, the 2019 Seattle Design Festival, and King County sustainability events.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Coreen Callister

A Retreat to Build Faculty Capacity for Mindful Leadership

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $2,999

Letter of Intent:

This initiative brings together a group of College of Built Environment (CBE) faculty to explore the relationships and synergies of three themes that inform our theory and practice—resilience and well-being; systems thinking; and biophilic design—as a potent means by which to enrich CBE faculty, pedagogy, and students in not only what our students need to know, but how their learning process reflects these interrelated concepts towards greater compassion. Building from insights gained through our course pilot this Spring, and as part of the Well Being for Life and Learning (WB4L&L) faculty community of practice, we look forward to engaging interested CBE faculty in collaboratively developing, applying, and reflecting on approaches.

We emailed all CBE faculty an invitation to participate and held an information meeting about the project. Interested faculty are responding to a Catalyst survey, and we hope to draw faculty from across the College’s five departments. This group will co-create a three-day faculty retreat (up to 10 people) at UW’s Friday Harbor Labs on San Juan Island this September to:

1. better understand and find common ground among each other’s disciplinary framing of these concepts;

2. explore results from the UW WB4L&L Spring Course Pilots and models of well-being and resilience practices from other universities;

3. experience and reflect on affordances of different environments for active learning and fostering well-being;

4. create a framework of approaches to incorporate into our Autumn courses. We will meet early, mid- and post-Autumn quarter to share findings, successes, failures, and next steps. Students enrolled in these courses will be asked to share feedback through optional Catalyst surveys. Our process and findings will be shared across the College and with the UW Resilience Lab, and we aim to explore potential for continued development within CBE.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Julie Johnson

Indigenizing Urban Seattle Podcast

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $861

Letter of Intent:

Indigenizing Urban Seattle is a podcast that contextualizes Indigenous environmental knowledge and resiliency from an urban Native lens. It serves as a platform to amplify urban Natives’ voices and perspectives in the environmental discourse. We focus on urban Natives currently residing in Seattle—a hub for urban Native resiliency, environmental activism, and solidarity movements.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Jessica Hernandez

Women in Applied Mathematics Mentorship Program (WAMM)

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,400

Letter of Intent:

WAMM is a student-run directed reading program that pairs undergraduate women interested in a mathematics-related field with Ph.D. students from the Applied Mathematics Department at the University of Washington. The pairs meet every week over the course of a quarter to work through a project decided upon during the first meeting based on the mentee’s interest. Projects typically involve a combination of reading texts or papers to learn new mathematical ideas, analytical work done by hand with pencil and paper, and numerical experimentation using a relevant programming language. In addition to their project material, participants are encouraged to discuss with their mentors other topics such as potential career paths, the graduate school application process, and what graduate school is actually like.

To promote a sense of community among the women in our program, we host and/or invite participants to a set of informal, but academically-oriented social events throughout the quarter including study halls and departmental “tea time”. The program culminates with a mini-symposium wherein the undergraduates give short presentations on what they learned and accomplished during the quarter.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Micah Henson

Resilience and Compassion @ Odegaard Pop-Up Events

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $700

Letter of Intent:

The “Resilience and Compassion @ Odegaard Pop-Up Events” will engage students in forming community around compassion and resilience, diversity, equity and inclusion, and holistic student wellness. The proposed event series will have a different focus each quarter that ties directly to the theme of resilience, compassion and sustainability:

- Fall Quarter 2019: Resilience and Compassion @ Odegaard: Student Digital Wellness

- Winter Quarter 2020: Resilience and Compassion @ Odegaard: Student Wellness and Equity

- Spring Quarter 2020: Resilience and Compassion @ Odegaard: Student Wellness Resources for Personal, Local & Global Sustainability, in collaboration with UW Student Life partners.

Each pop-up event will include interactive activities (making, crafting, reflection), community-building (conversation starters, encouragement cards, interactive whiteboards), food, and companion resources like book displays and referrals to campus student services. This proposed event series will be done in collaboration with students, with opportunities for student leadership built in to each event

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Emilie Vrbancic

Steam Condensate Reclamation - Feasibility Study

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $400

Letter of Intent:

This mini-grant will be used to fund a portion of a larger feasibility study regarding the use of reclaimed water on campus. With support from UW-Facilities and the department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, I have spent the last eight months determining the feasibility of reclaiming steam condensate from the campus utility tunnel system. The University has 8.5 miles of subterranean tunnels that serve every building with steam, chilled water, electricity, compressed air, and IT cables. The tunnels have a drain system that collects and conveys the water that is generated as condensate from the steam pipes (formed through humidity or via leaks) as well as groundwater that infiltrates the utility tunnels. Currently, the water is collected through a pipe system and is discharged into the sewer system or the SPU storm conveyance system. Through targeted renovations, it may be possible to reclaim a portion of this water and use it for various services including irrigation, cooling tower, dust control, and, notably, as fill water for Drumheller Fountain.

The use of this water would have several sustainability benefits for the University as well as major policy implications. The University would decrease its water use, sewer loading, and waste discharge into Lake Washington – reducing carbon emissions, CSO contributions, and pollutant loading into local water bodies. To my knowledge, groundwater has not been used as a reclaimable water source. Groundwater collection is subject to water rights permitting, but managing incidental groundwater collection is the responsibility of the land owner. Therefore, the groundwater infiltrating the utility tunnels would be considered incidental; in theory, it could be reclaimed and repurposed, which would be unprecedented.

The overall feasibility study is investigating the use of this reclaimed water for Drumheller Fountain. Over the course of this study, I have evaluated the existing Fountain and tunnel infrastructure, determined the local hydrology and annual water table levels, identified city and state codes that could govern the use of this water, detailed treatment requirements, presented several construction options, detailed the financial and environmental benefits of the renovation, and drafted an education & outreach plan. In addition, I have been managing a longitudinal study on the water quality of Drumheller Fountain – measuring weakly pH, conductivity, nutrient concentration, algae content, turbidity, and presence of Daphnia (a small crustacean that is indicative of mesotrophic and eutrophic water bodies). This research has been supported in-kind by the Lakes Lab in the CEE department. With the water quality data from Drumheller, I will be estimating the possible impacts of adding the reclaimed water to the Fountain. I would be happy to share this document with the Campus Sustainability Fund once completed.

One of the last stages of this feasibility study will be to analytically determine the chemical composition of the reclaimed water. We have preliminary data on the chemical additives that the Power Plant puts into the steam system (non-toxic polymers to prevent pipe scaling and microbial growth), but we need to know the minerals present in the groundwater. I will be collecting a one-liter sample of the drain water during the week of April 22nd – 26th. We would like to analyze this sample collected from the underdrain system for the following elements: arsenic, barium, chromium, lead, copper, cadmium, mercury, nickel, and iron. We plan on running the samples on the Inductively-coupled mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) owned and operated by the CEE department. The Lakes Lab has made several in-kind financial contributions to this project (materials, equipment, technical support, etc.), but I would like to use my own funding for the use of the ICP-MS. The feasibility of using this water is dependent on the chemical composition, and the treatment system will be designed based on the relative concentrations of these heavy metals (if they are present).

There are four financial components for this research: the cost of acquiring a standard for the ICP-MS (a sample with known concentrations of elements), several centrifuge tubes, the rental time for the ICP-MS, and staff time for operating the machine. I am also requesting a small contingency (~10%) as a safety factor for additional equipment, time overruns, and other unexpected costs. All unused funds will be returned to the CSF. Through conversations with the CEE administration, the best method for using these funds would be “option 1” noted in the AARF form – charging our expenses against a CSF-assigned PCA code. Please see the AARF form for the CEE budget code. In total, I am requesting $400, which has been itemized on the attached budget sheet.

The sample analysis will commence upon approval by the CSF. I am targeting a completion of this feasibility study by the end of May (before my graduation). My feasibility study will be presented to UW Facilities, the CEE department, the UW Green Building Subcommittee, and other entities that are determined applicable.  I would gladly present this effort to CSF as well. For future student involvement, I plan on involving a junior-level CEE student to continue communication with UW Facilities. The education and outreach components of this funded project will coincide with the section included in the overall feasibility study. The portion of this project funded by CSF will not have any additional components after the one-time analysis; there will be no ongoing costs for maintenance or support.

Although research projects are usually not supported financially by the CSF, I believe this project is an exemption. If it can be shown that the groundwater and condensate mixture is reclaimable, there will be far-reaching impacts for the University and for state-wide water policy. The University could retrofit the underdrain system to collect the water rather than discharge it, using the water for irrigation, an auxiliary source for Drumheller, or a whole host of other non-potable options. Given the short timeline of this project, I have elected to apply to the Campus Sustainability Fund rather than an R&D program because I believe this project supports the requirements, preferences, and overall mission of the CSF.

 

Thank you for your consideration,

Alex Ratcliff

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Alexander Ratcliff

Pac-12 Sustainability Conference Student Registration Funding

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $490

Letter of Intent:

See attached documents

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Alexa Schreier

Khmer New Years Show 2019

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $560

Letter of Intent:

 

 

Sustainable Impact:

    1. Reduce waste and consumption (reduce carbon emissions at the point of production)
    2. Engaging the Khmer community and involving the Khmer community both on campus and off campus (incorporation and collaboration with environmental activists)
      1. Start of a ripple- to reconnect our roots with the environment that we have lost
    3. “Venerable Prenz Sa-Ngoun and I have been discussing the idea of exploring environmental issues in the Khmer communities here in the Pacific Northwest. For me, environmental issues includes topics like environmental/public health, social and emotional wellness, connecting to the land and our food, and so much more. Prenz began with teaching the grandmas at his temple about reducing plastic bag use (yay, re-useable bags) and I have been at Mt Baker Village teaching residents about how to sort out their waste properly and reduce how much we are collectively sending to a landfill. Our interests have merged into this idea - សាធុ (Sadhu) for Green - to engage young Khmer people, their families, our community in awareness and action for environmental wellness. My hope is that by approaching "environmentalism" with cultural pride and a justice-oriented lens, we will push the boundaries of the environmental field, and foster healthy homes (inside and outside) for our Khmer community.

Leadership & Student Involvement:

 

    1. NYS is a student run event that anticipates up to 700 guests
    2. KhSA members and officers make the body of the sustainability committee, and other leadership organizing teams for this event
    3. Student volunteers will assist in food distribution, set up, and educating people on sustainability by guiding proper waste disposal (will have volunteers stationed at trash bins, responsible for refilling water dispensers

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change:

 

 

    1. (see above volunteers)
    2. Raising consciousness and awareness about waste production and how to develop accountability with small steps
    3. Encouraging the use of bringing water bottles to refill at water stations (unlike previous years with water bottles and soda cans)- also healthier with juice alternative

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability:

    1. To start a legacy of sustainable and have that continue in future years
    2. Inspiring sustainable practices among other people
    3. Very easy to implement, just need the funds to purchase equipment 

Budget and exact numbers are included in the excel document, our budget adminstrator will be emailing his part as well. 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Andrew Chhor

A Green New Deal: Panel Discussion

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $750

Letter of Intent:

The Sustainable Impact of this project will be focused on social sustainability and engagement, as this project is a panel discussion on the potential impacts of policies from a Green New Deal (summarized in the bullet points below). The panel will discuss what types or policies may be implemented at the federal and state level and how that may affect our state funded university and campus sustainability plan. For example, during this legislative session here in Washington State there are three bills that address clean energy infrastructure and transportation, energy efficiency in the built environment and environmental justice for front line communities. Part of the discussion may include how these state policies or others like them at the federal level may impact our campus sustainability plan and communities here Washington.

 

The goals of the Green New Deal are:

  • to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions through a fair and just transition for all communities and workers;
  • to create millions of good, high-wage jobs and ensure prosperity and economic security for all people of the United States;
  • to invest in the infrastructure and industry of the United States to sustainably meet the challenges of the 21st century;
  • to secure clean air and water, climate and community resiliency, healthy food, access to nature, and a sustainable environment for all people of the United States for generations to come; and
  • to promote justice and equity by stopping current, preventing future, and repairing historic oppression of indigenous peoples, communities of color, migrant communities, de-industrialized communities, depopulated rural communities, the poor, low-income workers, women, the elderly, the unhoused, people with disabilities, and youth.

 

The Leadership & Student Involvement of this Project is founded on  student collaboration between Green Evans - the environmental student RSO for the Evans School of Public Policy, student members of the Climate Justice Caucus of the Graduate Student Union UAW 4121 and UW students of the Seattle Chapter of the Sunrise Movement.  The project is focused on providing an inclusive space for other students on campus to find out about the Sunrise Movement and how they might get involved with creating a more sustainable future for their communities. We see this event as an opportunity to engage with the Ethnic Cultural Center, students of color and student RSOs who may not see themselves as environmental justice activists, but whose communities have historically been disproportionately impacted by social, economic and environmental inequities.

 

This panel discussion on the Green New Deal is strongly focused on outcomes of Education Outreach and Behavior Change. It will educate students about the intersecting social, economic and environmental issues addressed by the Green New Deal and give students a sustainable framework to understand the challenges we face as a society if we want to create a more just and healthy world. It will engage students through outreach with opportunities to get involved with the Sunrise Movement and the fight for a more sustainable future. There are many levels of involvement for students interested in becoming active in this movement over the next year as Sunrise organizes events to #Change The Debate on climate change. Students will learn how behavior change in our political system can be impacted and transformed by youth activism as the Sunrise Movement and the youth movement in Europe are showing the world.

 

Feasibility, Accountability & Sustainability Last year, members of this group successfully organized a much larger town hall event in Kane Hall about the I-1631 carbon fee initiative and the history of carbon policies in Washington state more broadly. GreenEvans has a faculty mentor we can call-on if needed, and we have already been in touch with our RSO advisor Christina Coop. Also, we intentionally decided to have this event in a smaller space than Kane Hall (for ~100 people) to make sure we have the capacity among our group members to support this event given that it is just a few weeks away. We will track attendance at the event via sign-in with a laptop into a Google form to understand what majors and departments participated. We are also considering an online exit survey before people leave to gather basic information about the impact of the event.

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Namrata Kolla

2019 Global Leadership Summit

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $840

Letter of Intent:

Summary of project proposal:

The societal problems we face transcend sectors and disciplines, and while businesses and organizations are well-positioned to solve them, they need responsible leadership. Unfortunately, the future situations students will find themselves in are ambiguous and difficult; determining what’s best for all stakeholders is challenging. The solution is not simply teaching students about corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability, but it also entails giving them hands-on experiences with creative problem-solving about leading responsibly.

This is why we four students, Ben Weymiller, Emily Menz, Nabilla Gunawan, and Ricky Perry with support from the Global Business Center and Foster’s Certificate of International Studies in Business program (CISB), have formed a planning committee for the Global Leadership Summit on April 24th. Its purpose is to convene a campus-wide dialogue on CSR and sustainability in different sectors, and provide practical creative problem-solving experiences for students. A campus that doesn’t speak to these issues in a sustained and comprehensive way is letting its own students down by not properly preparing them for a present and future that demands, if not depends on, greater social responsibility and sustainability in leadership.

The Summit will focus on responsible leadership in socially-responsible business, public health, cross-sector collaboration, and cultivating change in your future career, all in a global context. Through its workshop and panel format, the Summit will provide a space for UW students, the Seattle community, and other curious learners of the Pacific Northwest to engage with real-world cases and discussions on topics related to leading responsibly and sustainably in the world. The element of leadership we believe most fundamental to enacting change is the willingness to learn from everyone and everything, and help others do the same. In the end, the mission of our summit is about helping students become hands-on learners in the field of CSR and sustainability so that when they face ambiguous situations or companies with dubious corporate governance, they can act responsibly and teach others to do the same.

Briefly explanation of how the project will meet the requirements and preferences of the CSF:

  1. Environmental Impact

This kind of public education can have huge implications for how our students come to act mindfully as future leaders, to unite a more and more ideologically polarized world. Students going into public policy, research, business, and health organizations can catalyze change in their roles that help mitigate and heal our environment. With responsible leaders in our government, corporations, and research institutes, these entities can be more easily enlisted in improving community health, green tech innovation, and ending global hunger. Moreover, students who attend the summit and get involved with environmentally-minded RSOs as a result of mingling at the reception or working together in the workshops will go on to strengthen their RSO’s projects and create a more sustainable campus. 

  1. Student Leadership & Involvement

            Any project or change that has progressed in history surely hasn’t come about through one person. Teamwork is a prerequisite for achieving lasting change and is a product of its members’ willingness to serve, learn, and lead. The Summit’s primary student leaders are Ben Weymiller from the Certificate of International Studies in Business program, Nabilla Gunawan from Net Impact UW, Emily Menz from ReThink UW, and Ricky Perry from Husky Global Affairs. Surrounding these individuals are the members of their RSOs and the programs they represent. It is our belief that the summit’s success rests on the involvement of students from all disciplines on campus. It was a student’s idea that bore the idea for this summit just last year, and it has been student energy and consultation that has evolved the idea to its present state, a tradition that will surely carry on in the years to come.

  1. Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

The Summit will quite possibly be students’ first step in engaging with and discussing sustainability and social responsibility in a global context. The Summit offers the very practical experiences that teach students, hands-on, how to become learners in complex and sensitive fields so that when they face ambiguous situations they can act responsibly and teach others to learn how to do the same. The strategies and experience developed through this project will thus continue to help students in serving their communities.

            Several learning goals the planning committee has for the students that attend the Summit are to:

  1. Grow students’ awareness of ethical and healthy business and environmental considerations in an international context through experience and practical application
  2. Build students’ creative problem-solving ability through cases and discussions that span different cultures and national contexts
  3. Connect students from different backgrounds to different RSOs and campus organizations that strive to continue the conversation through real-world applications

Collaborating with diverse groups at UW and leveraging cultural and ideological differences is important to producing an event that serves the many sub-communities in our world. The planning committee’s members came together in part because they believe they can conduct outreach and engage with UW’s diverse sub-communities and RSOs, and in doing so, make this less of a one-off event, and more of a catalyst for change.

Changing behavior is difficult; we are, after all, creatures of habit. Notwithstanding this, the Summit seeks to take students down one step of the way in a learning process of how to effectively advocate and express their ideas for sustainability and social responsibility. Each student will bring their own background and beliefs to the event, and all we can hope is to spark a conversation with them and encourage them to continue it the next day and the day after that.

  1. Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

Each planning committee member has experience with outreach, large event planning, and a familiarity with the Summit’s key concepts of social responsibility and sustainability in global leadership. Be it through planning the Global Health Business Case Competition, or curating insightful and engaging speakers for club meetings, it is our collective experience that has guided and will continue to guide our efforts and ambitions for the Summit.

While we each hold each other accountable for our commitments and action items, we still have regular check-ins with our mentors at the Global Business Center (Theresa Maloney), and Certificate of International Business program (Deanna Fryhle), with Theresa being our main contact helping with logistics and administrative support. We also look forward to working closely with CSF staff if awarded a small grant in order to ensure funds are used properly, as well as to share any ideas on how to improve the Summit or post-event efforts.

Institutionalizing the Summit and its values is the very task students who attend our discussions and Summit will be charged with when they go on to advocate for responsible leadership in their own organizations. This being the second year the Summit has been held, it was the vision of the first student planning committee to institutionalize this event for generations of students to come. After bringing this event back and creating infrastructure for it to continue, the goal of this year’s planning committee is to adapt the way the Summit is planned allowing for the content to be curated specifically around the present needs of the student body for any given year

 

Estimated Project Budget

Total Planned Expenses: $2,640

Non-Food Related Expenses: $840

  • Venue Fee ($140)
  • 6 Poster boards (2 for advertising,41 for day-of-event details) ($210)
  • Catering of Food and Drink for 150 people ($1800)
  • Parking permits for speakers ($100)
  • 20 color tabloids ($150)
  • Student photographer ($90)
  • Digital advertisements (150)
     

Project Timeline

  • Student Planning Committee Meeting Timeline (Thursdays 10:30 -11:30)
    • Weekly from 10/24 to day of the event
  • Advisor Planning Committee Check-in Meeting Timeline (Thursdays 12:00-1:00)
    • Weekly to biweekly from 10/24 to day of the event
  • End of November - First wave of reaching out to speakers
  • End of January - Solidify Speaker list
  • Present - Finalize speaker list and event format, supplement weaker panels with UW subject matter experts
  • 3/20 -  Finalize logo and promo materials
    • Listserv blurbs, quarter sheets, full-size posters (print and digital)
  • 4/1 - Finalize Facebook event page and make public
  • 4/5 - Increase Outreach Efforts
    • Share and promote the event on Facebook
    • Deliver quarter-sheet handouts to advising offices and desks
    • Contact school listservs (GBC, JSIS, etc)
    • Connect with points of contact on other campuses
  • 4/1 - Add RSVP google form to Facebook event and promo materials
  • 4/15 - Finalize Volunteer List
    • Set-up, Room Leads, Clean-up
  • 4/24 - Global Leadership Summit (Manage Day-of Logistics)
  • 4/29 - Send out Feedback surveys to Volunteers, Participants, and Speakers
  • 5/2 - Planning Committee Meeting to assess efforts and determine a path forward for next year
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Ben Weymiller

Taiko Kai Spring Concert

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

Taiko Kai’s third annual Spring Concert aims to provide a cultural and educational experience for individuals of all backgrounds through musical performance. Taiko Kai at the University of Washington is a Japanese drumming club that was founded in 2013. Led by students, the club teaches individuals how to play and perform taiko (drums) and various narimono (percussion). The experienced students pass on the movement and the style that was taught to them to continue the expression of this artform in the UW area. The club has grown into a 30-member performing ensemble and is one of the only groups on campus to perform Japanese art. Because of its ever-increasing size and musical ability, Taiko Kai saw the need to put on their first spring concert in 2017. This year, Taiko Kai is continuing the tradition with the third annual Spring Concert. The main goals of our Spring Concert are not only showcasing taiko skills that members have learned this year, but also it is an opportunity for members to plan and participate in a formal performance that will share Asian cultures with UW students and the general public. With so many members, it is difficult to involve all of them without a performance of this scale, making this event a vital part of keeping members engaged with learning the artform.

 

The primary performers of Taiko Kai’s 2019 Spring Concert will be members of Taiko Kai. The show will feature three other Asian drumming ensembles: Dekoboko Taiko, Seattle University Hidaka Taiko, and UW’s Hanwoollim (Korean drumming). The event will be open to the UW community as well as the general public to attract a variety of audiences. The other drumming groups will not be paid, they are friends of our club and we enjoy helping and including each other in our events.

 

We will begin promotion at the beginning of spring quarter (4/1/19), using paperless strategies like online videos and banners as well as flyers and posters to garner attention in the UW community. We will table outside the HUB to promote our show from then until the event, selling both student and adult tickets. While we promote our show in the weeks leading up to the big day, we will be preparing goods to sell at the concert. These include Taiko Kai buttons, stickers, and t-shirts, as well as homemade treats like mochi. We will have a dress rehearsal at our venue, Kane 130, on Saturday, April 27, 2019. This will give performers a chance to be on the stage. The following day, Sunday, April 28, is our concert which will be 3:00pm to 5:00pm.

 

Our club will have to pay Kane Hall for the two reservations (rehearsal and performance), which will cost $2430. We are also expecting to pay ~$450 for printing costs of promotional material and audience material. The grant would be used to help us afford Kane Hall and some of the printing fees.

 

With your help, we would like to continue the tradition of the Taiko Kai Spring Concert in order to facilitate personal growth of members and to promote cultural diversity in the UW student body and beyond.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Michael Hart (Taiko Kai)

Presence

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $3,250

Letter of Intent:

Letter of Intent:

 

Presence’ Mission:

 

The mission of our RSO is community building amongst students, around the topics of wellness and balance through the exploration of mindfulness practices. Through individual and group practice of meditation, students will support each other’s practices in being actively aware and focused in the present moment.

 

The founding of Presence was inspired from our (Ethan and Shelby) time working together at the UW Resilience Lab. We worked with Dr. Anne Browning, Director of the Lab, to analyze incoming data regarding the mental states of incoming freshmen. We discovered that an enormous amount of students struggled with themes of belonging, social connection, and self-esteem. Through discussion, the two of us came to share that we too had personally struggled with these themes as UW students. Furthermore, we came to recognize that both of us had found support during these tough times through our own personal practices of meditation. We shared the experience of using meditation as a tool to better understanding ourselves, as well as exploring how to heal in the face of personal challenges. Presence was born upon the realization that meditation, having been so useful for the two of us, may be useful for other students as well. Having wished that meditation had been more accessible at UW in our time of need, we hope that it now can be accessible for students in their time of need.

 

Both from personal experience, conversation with other students, and exposure to mental health data at the UW; It has become glaringly obvious how great the need is at our school for students to be able to experience genuine connection and community. We have experienced how meditation inspires groundbreaking inner-clarity and centeredness, and are adamant about building a community that is based upon the same values of transparency and honesty, as well as true-self expression and acceptance. Presence is a place where students can learn from one another's personal experiences and journeys, and inspire personal growth via the support of a student-led, student-run community.

 

In order to best facilitate our practices as a community of students, the external resources we require are an (1) appropriate meeting venue and (2) access to a meditation app subscription.

 

Programming:

 

Social Sustainability

 

  1. Forming Relationships; Local university district business owners & UW students:

In a neighborhood that is diverse among many sociological lines, this is an excellent opportunity for community building in the University District. Students are accustomed to staying within the parameters of the UW campus, and encouraging students to venture beyond on their way to the Hatha Yoga Center on 47th will assist students in becoming more familiar with their surrounding community. The University of Washington and small business owners will gain the chance to work with and know each other better, building a more cohesive social fabric between University Street and surrounding campus. A small case-study of the kind of relationships that may assist the University District in revealing commonality and oneness amongst the diversity that has demonstrated at times to be isolating amongst individual perceptions.

 

  1. Meditation as Preventative Medicine:

Silent practices of thinking deeply and contemplating, have shown to induce relaxation and a sense of inner peace. There have been many studies done regarding mindfulness meditation and mental health, suggesting that it has positive effects on anxiety and depression. For many, meditation is a tool used in coping with minimal to severe anxiety. It has been known to help individuals understand and manage intense feelings such as anger, fear, and such that may have negative effects on one's life. Student run contemplative sessions such as these will introduce self-sustaining emotional healing, and support students in juggling their diverse circumstances.

 

  1. Accessible (metro buses, off campus housing, on campus housing, walkable):

Hatha Yoga Center is a 14 minute walk from Central Campus, making it an accessible commute from class or studies. For those living on campus in dorms, the commute time is a standard 13 minute walk from both eastern Haggett Hall and southern Mercer Court  (9 minute bus ride using tuition included bus lines 45,71,73, also possible for southern dorm residents). For those coming from off-campus, University Street is a hub for a wide range of bus routes making it accessible for those who commute via metro or light rail. For those who drive, there is street parking, however limited, on a first come first serve basis at an hourly fee. Ethan and I also offer to help transport students if need be.

 

  1. Diversity: Mindfulness, introspection, contemplation, meditation; whatever you want to call it, can be a useful life enhancing practice in anyone's unique life. That being said, we understand that such practices can fit differently into different peoples’ lives. We recognize that every person comes from a different background, has different experiences, circumstances, demographics, identities. Such factors may play a role in affecting who feels welcome, comfortable, and safe around mindfulness practices. We want to make clear that Presence is a place for anyone and everyone, and aims to present a space that is accessible to all individuals. Furthermore, within the subject of meditation; Presence welcomes all practices, preferences, questions, and attitudes.

 

  1. Co-op styled structure: We believe a community-run, democratic, honest and transparent organization is crucial maintaining an organization that fosters student empowerment, passion, and belonging. We (Ethan and Shelby) see our roles as facilitators, and aim to encourage fellow students to engage in facilitation and leadership roles as they wish. In structuring group meetings that actively engage members in providing feedback, suggestions, expressing their views, and guiding group meetings, we aim to ensure that each student understands that the organization is existant to represent their wishes as they see fit. This is invaluable in the University setting, as we make space for students to participate in a ‘ground up’ organization in contrast to much of the ‘top-down’ philosophy embodied by many of institutions and classes at the UW. Presence hopes that this model will inspire students to take ownership in their introspective journey, and spread their passion to the rest of the group and all others they may encounter. Presence also abides by the seven cooperative principles of: Voluntary and open membership, democratic management, participation, autonomy and independence, education, training and information, cooperation, and community.

 

Environmental Sustainability

  1. Green space meditation (perusing in parks, around wildlife, green spaces on campus):

Connection with nature facilitates inner peace & stillness. Being in the presence of the great outdoors reminds us that we are connected with nature and the world at large, not separate from it. In engaging contemplative and still practices in the outdoors, students are provided the opportunity to get curious about nature on their own terms, and gain a recognition for its strong presence in their life. Students gain the opportunity to get more in touch with nature, and to further understand the importance of recognizing the role that nature plays in our lives and our ecosystem. Personal connection and positive experience with the outdoors is the first step in fostering a community which engages in the world both on behalf of their own needs and the intertwined needs of our earth. Additionally, engaging in physical activity also serves to connect us on a deeper level with our bodies, which are often forgotten when sitting in class most days.

 

  1. Physical + Mental Minimalism:

Mindfulness as a philosophy which explores one’s inner state, students may explore the relationship of thoughts and feelings, mind and heart. They may gain insight into the differentiation as well as relationships, between emotions and thoughts, assisting students in decision backed with genuine contemplation and thought. Taking a moment to breathe, relax, and contemplate will assist students in observing their habits and actions, in so allowing students to recognize which behaviors are serving them and which are not in comparison to their values. Students can recognize internal and external values, beliefs, practices, and intentionally select from there how they would like to proceed. Outcomes of these practices, can include themes of consumerism as hugely a part of our western, American culture. Students can have a better understanding on how actions such as shopping, consuming, etc. has an impact both on themselves, their community, and world at large. Exploring topics of sustaining satisfaction versus instant gratification.

 

  1. Meeting Space Requirements:

 

Space must provide students with a welcoming and comforting environment which is conducive for personal practices, such as silent sitting meditation. Academic spaces on-campus at the UW can be stress inducing because they are wholly competitive & busy environments.

 

A space off-campus is necessary for students to effectively shift away from an academic mindset in order to engage in vulnerable and therapeutic mindfulness practices. To quote a study published by the Springer Journal of Public Health, “Personal control, socially supportive relationships, and restoration from stress and fatigue are all affected by properties of the built environment” (Evans, Gary W. “The built environment and mental health”). Keeping this in mind, we fear that attempting to get students to engage in meditation practices in existing on-campus spaces (HUB, IMA, housing facilities) will be ineffective. Students will be unable to escape the mental busyness and happenings of student life (which often are culprits of stress), which will lead to a lack of club retention, community building and general sense of stillness.

 

The mindfulness class pass had meditation class series once (hosted in HUB), but decided to discontinue them due to a lack of retention. After speaking with the mindfulness program director, Danny Arguetty, we collectively identified the venue as a potential factor in explaining why students’ attendance rates trickled down.

 

Pros of off-campus space:

  • a (physical and mental) “vacation” from academic/campus life
  • accessible, walkable distance from on campus-housing
  • ”homey” feel, warm carpet, lighting, quiet space, built for purpose of yoga/meditation practices (not a mixed use space, conversely an established foundation built for mindfulness practices)

 

(2) Meditation App Subscription: Headspace

 

Shelby and I have both experienced great success using Headspace, a smartphone app which provides guided meditations, anxiety relief, and student specific “packages”: studying, balancing health & work, etc. Our goal is to provide Headspace to our members to prevent a lack of financial accessibility, which in our experience, is the largest barrier to the use of meditation apps. A student subscription costs $9.99 annually, and this relatively low cost would enable us to provide 25 members with this access. The use of this app would also help build community within the club itself, as you can add meditation “buddies” (other users of the app) to see and view each others’ meditations and activity. Members will provide us with a receipt for reimbursement.

 

Budget:

 

Presence Budget through Spring Quarter 2019 (1/28-3/15 and 4/1-6/7)
Item Unit Cost Units # of Weeks Total Cost
Meeting Space: Weekly Hourly Rent $35.00 1.5 hours 16 $840
Headspace- Meditation Subscription $10 25 people Subscription covers a full year $250
Total Cost       $1090

 

We are asking the Campus Sustainability Fund for $1000 to cover our expenses.

 

After evaluating several off-campus options, we settled on Hatha Yoga Center on the Ave & 47th. We have developed a great relationship with the owner, Ki, and her studio is able to provide all the necessary fixtures for a meditation practice (soft carpet, cushions, blankets, speakers).

 

Accountability and Feasibility

  • A close relationship with Danny Arguetty, the mindfulness director, will continuously provide us with guidance and support with regards to our club structure and with what’s been successful with students in the past.

 

We are excited to move forward and get our club rolling!

Thank you for taking the time to read this over and we look forward to hearing your thoughts.

 

Ethan & Shelby

Presence Co-Presidents

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Ethan Jone
Supplementary Documents:

Matsuri 2019

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $999

Letter of Intent:

Matsuri, which means "festival" in Japanese, is the Japanese Student Association's annual event where we showcase the diversity of Japanese culture with Japanese food, games, and performances. We have put on this event for more than 10 years, offering a place where the greater Seattle community can connect with each other through the rich culture of Japan.  Along with the many foods that we sell, we create a lot of waste in the form of plates, utensils, napkins, and water bottles, among others. As a culture, Japanese society has increased its efforts to protect the environment through more efficient waste management and better technology to reduce resource consumption. To reflect this, the Japanese Student Association would also like to take the initiative to make our event and our attendees more aware of the environmental impact. As a student led event run primarily by the officers in the RSO and other student volunteers, we hope to begin making this push for a more sustainable event for this Matsuri and all future Matsuri's to come, and through this funding we hope to significantly reduce waste on campus at our 700 attendee event. Not only that, we really strive to educate both our staff and our attendees through volunteer orientations and allocating more volunteers to monitor waste disposal to ensure that all of our new biodegradable ware will be properly disposed.

 

Although it will be a challenge, we are confident that by working with the HUB and through our own careful planning and budgeting, we will be able to eliminate all plastic waste at our event. Regarding the specific uses of our funding, we plan to utilize our funding on the following based on last year’s spending. Firstly, we will primarily focus on biodegradable tableware and utensils, which we estimate will cost us $800 to purchase the necessary utensils to serve all the guests at the event. This comprises of forks, knives, spoons, flat plates and cups for cold and hot drinks. In addition, we will focus on getting water dispensers to eliminate plastic water bottle waste, which we estimate will cost us $200 to rent. With any remaining money, we will focus on creating signage for the event to help people correctly dispose of their waste during the event which can be reused for all of our future Matsuri events. We will be in touch with our Student Activities Office Advisor to start organizing our orders as soon as funding is approved and hope to confirm orders by latest mid-April.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Nana Yamagata

Habitat Snags Outreach: Increasing the Urban Forest Health on Campus

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

The University of Washington has been creating more and more snags out of fallen trees in the past year. Grounds Management has added ~15 snags since we hired a new arborist to handle the tree work on campus. Adding snags (standing dead trees) to the landscape adds a substantial amount of ecological benefits. Snags (dead wood) provides new life to habitat. They provide food for many wood boring insects and mammals such as ants, beetles, and woodpeckers. The cavities within this dead wood make great nesting habitat and living quarters for woodpeckers, red squirrels and many other species of birds, bats and insects. When a tree dies it has only partially fulfilled its potential ecological function.

However, snags can be unsightly to people who do not understand their benefits. We would like to continue this trend of adding snags to the landscape and to change people’s perception about them by adding signage to increase their knowledge of its benefit for society. The signage will all be made out of salvage wood from the salvage wood program and will say:

‘When a tree dies it begins its second life as a snag. Snags aka standing dead wood provide habitat for thousands of living organisms such as insects, birds, and small mammals. Snags are a natural part of a forest ecosystem that are rarely available in an urban forests. Grounds Management has implemented a new program to provide habitat snags throughout campus, *this sign was constructed using salvage wood from the salvage wood program and funded by the Campus Sustainability Fund.’

Each sign will cost $100. We will put ten signs in front of some of the most visited snags on campus.’

 

Thank you for your consideration!

 

Michael Bradshaw

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Michael Bradshaw

Reusable Containers in Dining Halls

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $40,000

Letter of Intent:

 

 

Our project intends to bring reusable to go containers to dining halls across campus at UW Seattle. This project is being headed by students and leaders of SEED, with support from professional staff. To begin, we would like to use the grant money to start a pilot program to introduce the idea at a smaller scale in only one dining hall in autumn quarter of 2019. This provides an opportunity to see the potential benefits and problems to overcome and give us a good start for expansion into a more comprehensive system.

University of Washington prides themself on being a leader in sustainability. As SEED, we feel that one of the next steps to move forward in sustainability is introducing reusable rather than compostable containers in our dining halls. As of now, with over 45,000 students plus staff, we are creating enormous amounts of waste with to-go containers. Even though the containers are compostable, the sheer amount of compost can be hard to manage. In addition, 50% of the garbage in HFS housing is compostable material according to the 2018 Waste Characterization Study, and one can assume dining has similar levels of contamination. The large amount of contamination in garbage creates two problems. First, it increases the price HFS has to pay to remove all student waste, because compost and recycling do not have a cost attached for removal, while transport to a landfill costs the school. Second, disposable products use up energy and resources, and, if they are not disposed of properly, there is no benefit of seeing them turned into a new product after use. Instead, they only contribute to a growing landfill. The best option is to attempt to reduce this waste before it enters the waste stream, and to do so, washable, reusable containers should be offered as another alternative to go container. Other universities have successfully created a system for reusable containers in their dining halls, including Washington State University, UC Merced, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 

The containers we would like to use come from a company called Ozzi. The containers are already designed and the process for getting containers distributed is established, there is minimal work for the university in order to start the program on campus. The Ozzi system works in the following way: a student pays a small fee (in the range of $2 to $5) and receives a clean container. The student then uses the container to store and eat food. When the student is finished, they place the container in the Ozzi machine so the barcode can be scanned. The container is deposited into the machine and the student is given a token. This token can be used by the student to receive another to-go container. Thus, the student only has to pay one time for unlimited access to containers throughout the year. When the containers are deposited, HFS staff take them back to clean them along with the rest of the cutlery and dishes. We would purchase the following products: two (2) Ozzi machines in Center Table, 2,000 - 3,000 containers (these can be in a wide variety of formats - the pilot program would include the standard, single-entree clamshell), 2,000 tokens, 10 boxes of liner bags, 4 OZZI carts (used to transport the used containers). This will cost approximately $40,000. We hope to purchase the equipment and have staff trained so we can begin the program at the start of autumn quarter 2019.

 

The idea for this project was initiated by members of SEED and is being lead by Luke Schefke, Director of Communications, and supported by the rest of the executive board. They saw this as a way to reduce waste produced on campus and reduce UW’s contribution to emissions. We have already gained strong support from our partners in HFS, including Clive Pursehouse, Torin Munro, and the rest of the Sustainability Committeewho are willing to assist and direct SEED in our efforts as we work towards implementing this system. SEED will also have a large influence in the education of introducing this system, with plans to create posters, have an event with tabling and demonstrations in the dining hall, and have members stationed by the machines to explain the program.

 

We are applying for a CSF grant because HFS, our community partner, has a mostly predetermined budget. With funding from a grant, this would allow us to see how a system such as this would function, so HFS feels secure in taking a larger financial commitment in the future. The amount that we are requesting would cover the price of the machines, containers, tokens, liner bags, and carts. It would not cover any maintenance or utilities costs, but this is not expected to be significant and can be covered through other means (SEED funds of HFS rebudgeting). By providing this grant, the Campus Sustainability Fund can support a program that improves sustainability across UW and help create a sustainable habits in students for years to come.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Luke Walter Schefke
Supplementary Documents:

Kinetic Light-up Crosswalks: Phase 1

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $100,000

Letter of Intent:

Imagine you are a student, it’s a dark and damp rainy Seattle night... you are tired from studying all week and are hurrying to get home. You step out into an ordinary crosswalk at the corner of a sharp bend in the road. A car swerves to avoid you, as you are nearly invisible in the darkness. This story and many like it show the importance and necessity of safer crosswalks. Our project idea stems from this need and desire to make commuting by foot, bike, bus, or car as safe as possible.

 

OVERVIEW

This project draws on interdisciplinary expertise and creativity in developing luminaire crosswalk pavers powered by kinetic energy to sustainably and innovatively improve safety at the University of Washington (UW) Seattle Campus. Ultimately, we want to implement the highest performing prototype to the most dangerous crosswalks on campus to keep students safe. Addressing the UW’s Campus Landscape Framework objective of creating connections across the “mosaic” of the Central Campus, this prototype will improve circulation through an iconic landscape, create a unique experience, increase safety, and create opportunities for collaboration between students and industry partners. The primary project team includes masters and doctorate students from the College of Built Environments and College of Engineering (throughout the phasing process, more team members will be added, including undergraduates).

Optimization of infrastructure is a traditionally complicated endeavor. Collection, transmission, and distribution are common obstacles to utilization of revolutionary renewable energy. By directly integrating energy collection into the object it powers, these obstacles are overcome and the system is much more efficient and accessible to consumers. Microgenerators harnessing kinetic energy are in development and could be used to power paver luminaires, improving safety and visibility without depending on the power grid. Additionally, the implementation of this project would create an opportunity to improve stormwater management at intersections throughout campus. (Future phasing of prototypes might integrate stormwater detention mechanisms that can manage runoff and improve water quality in surrounding bodies of water).

 

SUSTAINABLE IMPACT

Environmental

Our prototypes promote renewable and alternative energy by creating an off-the-grid kinetic energy mechanism that runs the LED pressurized systems during the low-light to dark hours of the day.

Socio-economic

Thinking long-term, we are hoping to create a prototype that will be marketed to all of the UW campuses and the city of Seattle, particularly in marginalized communities.

Cultural

A culture of road safety for all modalities should be created. Pedestrians are as entitled to safety mechanisms as drivers or bicyclists.

 

STUDENT LEADERSHIP AND INVOLVEMENT

We are advocating for student involvement at every point and every level of the project. It is a student run team that is designing for students. We are inclusive, always willing to include other disciplines and expertise. We are proposing a phased strategy that will provide students the opportunity to engage in project development, business planning, and product fabrication.

 

EDUCATION, OUTREACH, AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE

Behavior change: Providing luminous circulation and connection throughout the UW campus, regardless of weather conditions or damage to the grid, will likely help pedestrians feel more secure and independent, while cyclists and drivers will be alerted to movement around them.

Outreach: This project will provide the student team first-hand experience in product development, fabrication, and implementation. It will support the efforts of the university to improve the campus’ experiential qualities; update, control, and maintain campus lighting; and ensuring that campus users feel safe. As these concerns are currently addressed separately by the Campus Architect, Operations, and Police Department, a consolidated and self-sustaining response would aid in honing their work.

Education: Students will be exposed to unprecedented sustainable technology applications and the learning opportunities that come with its operation. Additionally, the larger UW community will act as a testing ground for revolutionary infrastructure. The system will need to be inspected and maintained, this too will provide data collection and technology optimization opportunities. This project also builds on the Campus Illumination Roadmap previously supported by Campus Sustainability Fund, and could be included in their research.

 

FEASIBILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY

The project team would engage with the Office of the University Architect, the Campus Engineering and Operations Office, and UW Faculty from the College of Built Environments. There is also potential for engagement with Seattle City Light.

Funding would be invested in developing prototypes of our product. The project team would fabricate as many components as possible, but may need to reach out to local manufacturers of structural glazing systems.

 

ESTIMATED BUDGET

The implementation of this project includes building and testing multiple physical prototypes which we estimate to be $100,000. The budget components are detailed below:

  • Electrical/Computer/Controlling backbone components: $10,000
  • Mechanical/Chemical hardware infrastructure: $50,000
  • Lab/test instruments: $10,000
  • Structural glazing and frame system: $30,000

 

PROJECT TIMELINE

Our phase one of the project is planned to be carried out and completed in one year.
Within this year there are three phases:

1- Technical studies: Currently underway. We will continue this phase until final project approval and if need be, into the prototyping phase to ensure the highest levels of performance in the prototyping.

2- Prototyping/Testing/Troubleshooting: This phase is planned to be initiated upon the approval of the proposal and the fulfillment of necessary financial supply. This phase is expected to be completed within six months from the start, with all the prototypes tested and evaluated under real operation conditions, and the highest performing one selected for campus implementation

3- Implementation: This phase will likely pursue a later funding cycle due to the complexities of construction and implementation. During this phase, we hope to work with UW Facilities and Seattle Offices.

 

TEAM

Janie Bube (Master of Landscape Architecture)

Emilia Cabeza de Baca (Master of Architecture)

Martha Hart (Masters of Urban Planning)

Arman Rahimzamani (PhD in Electrical Engineering)

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Janie Bube

Ethnoforestry: Applying and integrating a new model of ecosystem sustainability on campus

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $70,000

Letter of Intent:

Title: Ethnoforestry: Applying and integrating a new model of ecosystem sustainability on campus

Summary of Project

UW’s Olympic Natural Resources Center (ONRC) has been developing and implementing a project focused on the new discipline of ethnoforestry throughout this academic year through a CSF grant. We would like to submit a letter of intent for one more year of funding to continue and expand current projects as well as develop new ones. Throughout this year, the Ethnoforestry project has gained traction and captured the attention of people across campus, creating new partnerships and pushing the boundaries of our understanding of sustainability. Ethnoforestry uses a new model that incorporates both community and environmental wellbeing together in order to achieve sustainability. Through this effort, we have reached out to the UW community and beyond to understand ways we can improve both the wellbeing of our campus and the region. With one more year of CSF Funding, we hope to capitalize on this momentum to engage even more people across campus for this interdisciplinary project.

 

Throughout this year we have been establishing ethnoforestry garden beds in partnership with UW Grounds and the Intellectual House. What started as a way to integrate some ethnobotanical plants into our campus green spaces has developed into a project with a much larger potential scope. The Intellectual House supports our concept of expanding to many beds across campus, each highlighting tribes from a different region across the state with direct input from tribal students. We would like to use future CSF funding to collaborate with tribal students to determine which plant species they would like to see representing their tribe, install those culturally significant plants in campus garden beds, and organize harvesting events where both tribal and non-tribal students would be able to participate in this applied ethnoforestry work. This would create more opportunities for restoration, volunteer engagement, and creating inclusive spaces where all students can learn in a hands-on and applied way.

 

As interest in this project continues to spread, we would like to use funding to conduct formalized interviews with UW students, both tribal and non-tribal, to understand ways students respond to and their interest in ethnoforestry. Having a better grasp on the needs of the UW community will inherently help us develop a model of sustainability that meets them. This will ensure that all voices from across campus are heard.

 

Finally, we would like to use funding to build upon our current work. We would like to expand the number of culturally important plant species being studied and grown at the Center for Urban Horticulture both in the greenhouse and at our raised beds where we are currently working to grow bare root style plants. Additionally, we would like to host workshops at the new ONRC plant nursery being installed in late Spring 2019. This would bring together UW students and the tribal community to learn from one another and grow cultural keystone plant species.

 

Sustainable Impact

This project will absolutely enhance the sustainability of campus. By expanding our ethnoforestry garden beds, we will be able to highlight culturally important plants from tribes across the region. This will provide a tangible space where all tribal students can see a piece of their home represented on campus, a space that also sits on historic tribal land. Additionally, these campus green spaces are often overrun by invasive plant species. By creating ethnoforestry garden beds, we will remove these plants and replace them with native species that can serve an important ecosystem function. Finally, by conducting student interviews, we will be able to better serve and enhance the experience of all students on campus.

 

Leadership & Student Involvement

This project has, and will continue to be, a totally student driven effort. If awarded, the grant will be used to fund a Research Assistant (RA) position for a graduate student in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. Each quarter, the RA will take on interns who will be able to have a more in-depth and intensive involvement in the project as well as receive credit for their work. The RA will also host capstone students who are interested in answering key ethnoforestry questions. In addition, the RA will offer consistent work parties to generate opportunities for students to get involved.

 

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

Instead of focusing on a formal and classroom based education, we will showcase how ethnoforestry can be directly applied. All students that participate will be learning from this process and can apply it to their own work. We have been growing a consistent volunteer base throughout this year and expect that it will continue if we received funding for next year. This has shown us that there is a need for this type of work on our campus. We anticipate that as students continue to learn from the project, there will be direct benefits and behavior changes.

 

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

We have worked hard to lay the groundwork for this project throughout this year. We absolutely believe that is necessary and feasible. We have received support from UW Grounds, the Intellectual House, SEFS, and the College of the Environment’s Deans office. These groups have provided guidance and feedback, helping to keep us accountable and improve our work. We believe that with one more year of funding we will be able to expand our efforts, creating a wider reaching and more inclusive project that inherently changes the way we understand sustainability.

Project Budget

We are requesting $70,000 for this project. This amount would include funding for one Research Assistant position for the 2019-2020 academic year, supplies and signage for our ethnoforestry garden beds, plant production supplies, and transportation to and from the ONRC nursery. We expect to use funds from Fall 2019 through Summer 2020 with the completion of the project scheduled for end of Summer 2020. 

 

Contact Information

Courtney Bobsin

cbobsin@uw.edu

 

Bernard Bormann

bormann@uw.edu

 

Frank Hanson

Fsh2@uw.edu

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Courtney Bobsin

Native Greenroof Sculpture

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF:

Letter of Intent:

Originally developed for the mercer court site, Native Green roof Sculpture has since expanded beyond its original site, with an intention to find a more site-specific location to maximize its overall effectiveness and impact. With this in mind, I am applying for a feasibility study in order develop important information on site location, and ecological /design consultation.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Luke Armitstead

Native Gardens at UW Farm

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $9,155

Letter of Intent:

Project Title: Native Gardens at UW Student Farm

Total Funds Requested from CSF: $9,155.00

 

Submitted by: Kamaka’ike/Natalie Bruecher, student and Perry Acworth, UW Student Farm, manager

 

UW Farm

The University of Washington Student Farm (UW Farm) is a student-run farm with three different growing spaces on campus. The proposed project would cultivate native gardens at a vacant growing space at the Mercer Court farm site, (plot 4.0) and renovate a permaculture planting at the Center for Urban Horticulture.

 

At UW Farm, our mission is to promote the study and practice of urban agriculture and sustainability. With this proposed project, we are working to incorporate food sovereignty values into our vision of sustainable agriculture. This directly addresses social and environmental aspect of sustainability.

 

Wǝɫǝaltxʷ - Intellectual House

The Intellectual House is a longhouse-style facility that serves as a multi-service learning and gathering space for American Indian and Alaska Native students, faculty and staff. The purpose of the Intellectual House is to increase Native American students’ success at UW by preparing them for leadership roles in their tribal communities and the region.

 

Project Description:

The proposed project will be a collaboration between the UW Farm and the Intellectual House as well as other Native American groups on campus and in the community as we work together to design and plant two gardens of indigenous plants with significance in native food traditions.

 

Food Sovereignty is defined as “the inherent right of a community to identify their own food system”. As one step towards food sovereignty for the UW community, we hope to help create spaces where students, staff, faculty, and community members can learn about, grow, and consume traditional foods. While the details of garden planning and future events will be driven by our campus and community partners, we envision this project will incorporate educational events, community gatherings, art and storytelling. This project will be a collaboration between UW Farm staff/interns/volunteers, Native student groups on campus, staff and faculty partners, tribal Elders and community members. Campus and community partners will determine the specific design for the native garden.

 

UW Farm and the Intellectual House will meet with campus partners to discuss the development of this project, and to identify students interested in taking on a leadership role related to organizing and sustaining this project. We then plan to host tribal Elders at a larger ceremony, celebrating the creation of this space. When plant species are chosen, they may be purchased from the Society for Ecological Restoration Native Plant Nursery and local nurseries and seed resources.

 

Requirements and Preferences:

This project will contribute to biodiversity and restoration by reintroducing native plant species to the UW campus at two of the UW Farm’s growing sites. It will specifically focus on the reintroduction of edible and medicinal plant species, addressing social and environmental sustainability and issues related to food security.

 

This project will focus heavily on student leadership. UW Farm employs several student workers each year. The farm will hire a Native Garden Liaison position to work directly with members of the Intellectual House. The Intellectual House is able to hire students for Native Garden work. We plan to engage with Native American student groups on campus and envision this space to truly be student-created and led.

 

This project will focus on engaging Native American campus and community members to share knowledge, stories, song, and tradition among generations. The Native Gardens will also be the site for larger educational events that could bring in students from all backgrounds to learn about food sovereignty, indigenous foods, food security, social sustainability and the history of the Puget Sound land and peoples.

 

UW Farm has met with partners at the Intellectual House to discuss the feasibility of this project. With the Intellectual House and UW Farm’s ability to devote funds to hire student leaders, we can ensure commitment and continued work on this project in the future. Cultivating gardens on UW Farm’s space also ensures continued maintenance by UW Farm staff and student volunteers.

 

Timeline and Budget:

  • Spring 2019: Submit LOI to CSF committee.
  • July 2019: Hold community meeting/ceremony with tribal Elders and on-campus project partners. Lunch provided, gifts provided to Elders. Estimated attendance: 15-35 people. Activities - Storytelling, Educational activities, Initial site designs for Mercer Court plot and the improvement/renovation of the permaculture site at CUH. Estimated cost: $350
  • August & September 2019: Finalize garden designs, signage, educational content for websites, plan harvest and cooking events, educational materials design, production and harvest timelines, procurement of plants, purchase of hardscaping materials. Estimated cost $2,700 signage, educational materials, website update, $975 hardscaping, $400 plants
  • October & November 2019: Students, volunteers, farm manager and Intellectual house members install native gardens and signage at Mercer Court and CUH. A kick-off event will be held during Dawg Days with storytelling at the Intellectual House and tours of Native garden sites. Estimated attendance, 35-55 people. Over the following 8 weeks, the UW Farm will host 8 work parties to complete the work. Estimated attendance: 50-75 people.Estimated cost: Planting and installation $0.00. Storytelling and harvest event at Intellectual House $550, Harvest Event at UW Farm’s, Farm to Table event, $500.   
  • Ongoing, post project completion: Continued involvement of community partners and UW Farm students/interns/volunteers to maintain the garden spaces. Ongoing community events, medicinal and crop harvests and meals, that allow students involved in farming and sustainability to connect with and learn from Native People and learn about the cultivation and significance of indigenous foods. Estimated exposure due to the website information, permanent signage, annual work parties and harvest events: 40,000+ people Estimated cost: Future garden maintenance, plantings and activities will be absorbed into regular seasonal production for the UW Farm and Intellectual House programming. $0.00

 

Total Funds Requested from CSF: $9,155.00

  • Native Garden Liaison: 10 hrs./week during Summer and Fall quarters (23 weeks @ $16/hr.) $3,680
  • One-time purchase of materials: $5,475

 

 

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kamaka’ike/Natalie Bruecher, Student Lead Intellectual House
Supplementary Documents:

UW-APL Clean Propulsion

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $28,350

Letter of Intent:

Summary of Project Proposal

The UW Applied Physics Laboratory is asking the Campus Sustainability Fund for $28,350 to purchase an electric propulsion system from PureWaterCraft with hydraulic steering controls.  Funds from this grant will be used to bring a new technology into the UW APL which we could not do without being awarded a grant or contract specifically requiring it.  Optionally, a system supporting smaller hulls could be purchased for $19,850 if the committee prefers.

 

An Applied Physics Laboratory student team, working with Engineers from UW APL and PureWaterCraft, will design a mounting and control system which will allow the motor and battery pack to move easily between a multitude of hulls.  A RHIB install will be set up for transport to remote locations for rapid deployment in fragile environments.  The control systems will enable remote or autonomous control of the vessel for future research and development of autonomous systems which will be used for future student projects.

 

Both hulls will be clearly marked UW APL and Electric Drive Research or some other indication of alternative energy to encourage outreach.  Photos of these boats will be included in project write ups and publications which will get broad distribution.  These boats will be seen often while operating around the Seattle waterfront and Lake Washington.   

 

CSF funds will be used to purchase the propulsion system from PureWaterCraft.  UW APL will supply a hull for the project.  UW APL will also fund the student time for the project and individual engineers will donate the mentoring time for the installation and system test.

 

The UW APL is a leader in AUV development and use which requires many launch and recovery operations from small boats.  APL Field Engineers and student helpers operate vehicles that navigate underwater using acoustics that are sensitive to noise in the water.  The virtually silent propulsion system from PureWaterCraft will be ideal for tracking and recovering AUVs while the absence of exhaust makes life better for the students and Field Engineers in the boat at slow idle or station keeping waiting for a vehicle to surface.

 

The UW APL averages 65 Field Projects around the world every year and employs 45 students.     

 

 

Brief Explanation of how we meet Requirements & Preferences

Sustainable Impact

Environmental sustainability – As a leader in Arctic research UW APL operates small boats in the most fragile environments in the world, locally we have small craft operating in Lake Washington frequently and moored in the lake every day.  The gas powered motors on our boats are properly maintained, however they still emit exhaust which is run underwater before rising to the surface leaving pollutants in the water and in the air.  Sensors we design or purchase can be contaminated by oil and exhaust residue rendering them inoperable.  Long before the UW Climate Action Plan was created UW APL lived in a word of “leave no trace”. 

 

Leadership & Student Involvement

Students will lead the design and installation with oversight and mentoring

These boats will be used primarily by students and Field Engineers to deploy and recover AUVs and various other marine equipment or to support a larger vessel.

 

Education, Outreach & Behavior Change

UW APL is a unique position to be a technology evaluator and innovator in the regional commercial fishing industries as well as the international Oceanographic and Marine Science communities.  UW APL has a long history of being actively involved in community outreach, this is the 14th year that the UW APL has worked with the Pacific Science Center to put on the Polar Science Fair at the Science Center.  Through the Collaboratory, UW APL hosts Marine Technology startups which allows us to support them and at the same time share best practices which then spread through the industry.

 

Feasibility, Accountability & Sustainability

UW APL, and the mentors on this team, has demonstrated the ability to conceive, design and build systems deployed in the harshest marine environments.  We routinely manage large contracts to completion and have an excellent reputation with the U.S. Navy and other organizations.

 

Eric Boget, a U.S.C.G. licensed vessel operator and engineer, manages and maintains the UW APL vessels and docks. 

 

Key Stakeholders

Eric Boget – As the head of UW APL Vessel Operations, Eric will be responsible for the vessels when released into the fleet.  Maintenance, operations and training will fall under his budget.  Eric has control over who can operate vessels and in what conditions.

 

Andrew Stewart – Associate Director of PMEC, the Pacific Marine Energy Center, Andy Stewart helps marine startups transition technology and has recently commissioned a UW APL vessel for renewable energy research.  As an experienced Marine Architect and M.E. Andy is an advocate for our technology innovations in Washington State and Washington D.C.

 

Craig McNeil – Craig, a UW APL Principal Oceanographer and Affiliate Professor of Oceanography, spends an inordinate amount of time getting equipment and vehicles in and out of the water.  As one of our most active users of AUVs Craig works with students and Field Engineers with a vehicle called a REMUS 100.

 

 

Core Project Team

Students Leads - Ian Good UW ME, Amelia Marie Barr UW ME

UW APL Vessel Operations - Eric Boget

Electronics Mentor - Steve Kahle

Mechanical Mentor - Dave Dyer

 

Itemized Budget

Pure Outboard Motor                         $6000

Pure Battery Pack                               $8500

Pure Charger                                       $2000

SeaStar Pro Steering                          $1600

Reactor 40 Hydraulic Autopilot         $1750

                        Total                           $19850

 

Optional 2nd Battery Pack                  $8500

                        Total                           $28350

 

Project Timeline

Submit LOI                                                                                         March 1

Submit Full Proposal                                                                         April 15

Receive Decision                                                                                June 1

Receive Funding                                                                                 June 15

Prepare hull(s)                                                                                   July 1

Design Battery Mounting System                                                      July 1

Design Control System                                                                      July 15

Receive Motor and battery pack(s)                                                    September 1

Test fit mountings and controls                                                         October 15

Water test completed system                                                             October 30

 

Contact Information

Primary Contact: Ian Good – Student Lead IanGood@uw.edu

Secondary Contacts: Steve Kahle – Student Mentor skahle@apl.washington.edu

Secondary Contacts: Eric Boget – UW APL Vessel Operations boget@apl.washington.edu

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Ian Good

3D Bin Displays

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $2,783

Letter of Intent:

Background: 

Our goal is to install new 3D bins – displays with physical items instructing people how to sort their trash, recycling, and compost – in the Husky Union Building (HUB)’s food court, the Husky Den. These 3D bins should help UW divert waste from landfills, educate and engage the student body about the waste disposal process and it’s impacts, and ease the burden of maintaining the previous bin displays.  

The Husky Den has ten three-bin (compost, recycling, and trash/landfill) waste disposal stations, each of which has had 3D bin displays for the past few years. The 3D displays have been far more effective than any other form of signage currently used by the UW. A recent study by students in ENVIR 250 found that UW’s 3D displays (referred to in the study as “signs with physical items”) had the highest rate of sorting accuracy of the signage studied. Waste was disposed with 81% accuracy at bins with 3D displays, compared to just 61% accuracy for posters and 68% for videos (Chiado et al.). Despite their effectiveness as educational tools, the 3D displays have been a makeshift, labor-intense operation to maintain. Created by UW staff and students on their own time by sawing plastic bins in half, hot-gluing relevant compost, recycling, and trash materials onto the half-bin, and covering the open front with sheets of polylactic acid, the bins need frequent maintenance. Thus far, the bins have had to be maintained by a single member of the UW Sustainability Office, who cleaned and repaired the bins once a month without pay. The situation is exacerbated by the fact that the bins’ open-top design has led students to use the displays as basketball hoops for food items and condiment packages.  

Over winter break of the 2018-2019 school year, HUB custodians took bins down for cleaning and they were thrown away by accident. Because HUB management and Housing and Food Services will not replace the bins, EcoReps would like to take this opportunity to 1) improve the displays by creating more effective and more easily maintained signage and 2) engage the broader UW community in a conversation about the waste disposal process. 
 

Sustainable Impact: 

With our project we are hoping to make a sustainable impact on the UW campus by teaching people about how to recycle and compost waste properly. This project will help our campus to be more sustainable by diverting waste, which the university produces a huge amount of, from going to landfills.  Landfills tend to be located near low-income communities and communities of color. While this environmental justice issue also requires action at the state level, our project will help reduce UW’s contribution to the problem by combatting our reliance on landfills. By diverting waste from landfills, we will also be reducing the chances of situations like contaminating ground water streams with landfill runoff, as well as reducing the air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions generated by landfills and transporting waste to landfills. 

Leadership & Student Involvement: 

This project is a student-led project through UW EcoReps. Officers from EcoReps, Julie Tolmie and Christina Cameron, have helped guide us when it comes to reaching out to other people and other organizations, such as UW Recycling and the School of Design, for assistance in our project. Our project team includes: 

  • Justin Brave 
  • Marycela Guzman 
  • Tanya Cortes 
  • Julie Tolmie 
  • Christina Cameron 

Faculty/Staff Member:  

  • Erica Bartlett - Project Support Supervisor, UW Recycling 
  • Liz Gignilliat - Manager, UW Recycling 

 

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change: 

The Husky Dens’ waste disposal signage is important to replace because UW draws students, staff, and faculty from across Washington, as well as many from out of state and out of the country. Many may not be familiar with how to dispose of compost in particular. Food waste is not the only area where students, staff, and faculty may be confused. While UW dining locations switched to compostable service wear at all dining locations in 2016, campus education on these materials lags behind. Without proper sorting, the switch is not effective as it could be. While educating students, staff, and faculty about waste disposal is important, students don’t participate in workshops or listen to presentations on correct sorting, making signage at bin stations the primary form of waste education at UW. Improving bin signage is therefore the easiest way to improve waste education on campus.  

Our project will serve as a way to increase awareness and engagement with students, staff, and faculty who use Husky Den on the waste disposal process. Each 3D display case will include facts about the waste cycle – including what happens to trash, recycling, and compost after it’s thrown into a bin, as well as how landfills impact communities and the environment. To extend the reach of these displays beyond the actual stations and reach out to the larger campus, we will work on posters to draw in attention to the new bin displays. The posters will tell the story of how we designed the 3D displays and educate students, staff, and faculty about how the UW’s waste is processed.  

More broadly, this project will show the university’s support for a culture of environmental sustainability on campus. For many, compost, recycling, and trash stations are the most visible sign of UW’s commitment to environmental sustainability.  

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability:   

UW EcoReps is an RSO that has operated at the UW Seattle campus for a number of years, partnering with service learners, regular members, and the UW Sustainability Office to successfully implement environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable projects such as the quarterly Green Husky Market, a market featuring local vendors on Red Square. In addition to UW EcoReps, UW Recycling and the UW Sustainability Office have also shown support for this 3D bin display project. UW Sustainability contributed to the long-time maintenance of the existing bins and UW Recycling has assisted with the design and budget estimating process.  

Reference: 

Chiado J., Savanh L., Shang J, and B. Stroosma. It’s all in the signs: the effect of signage detail on composting accuracy.  

Itemized Budget:

 

Item  Individual Price  Number Needed  Item Total Cost 
Display case  $101.95 ($79.95-Case $22.00-Shipping)  30  $3,058.50 
Ring table holder (36 piece set)  $16.97 ($12.98-Holder $3.99)  120 (4 sets)  $67.88 
Colored Paper Backdrop  $5.99  1 bulk  $5.99 
3-Bin Display materials  $15.00  10  $150.00 
Total  $3,282.37 
Additional Funding Source, contingent on CSF funding:   UW Recycling - $500.00 

 

Asking  $2,782.37 
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Julie Tolmie

Eat Local Seattle Food Fair

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,200

Letter of Intent:

 

 

Summary of his/her project proposal:

The Supplier Diversity Program at UW is a registered student organization that promotes the use of local, minority, women, and LGBTQ owned companies around the greater seattle area. Eat Local Seattle Food Fair is just one of the many outreach projects that we are working on, in order to encourage the UW community to utilize these companies. We will be inviting vendors from across the community to come on to campus (HUB Walkway) on September 28th, in conjunction with Dawg Daze to sell their goods, and be further exposed to the UW community. Our hope is to provide a fun interactive experience for the UW community during the first week of fall quarter, but we also strive to generate exposure for the companies that will in turn help their business in the long run. Whether it be through UW departments utilizing them as suppliers in the future, or students simply visiting them during the school year. The long term impact is of utmost importance to us.

 

Environmental Impact

While our project does not directly reduce the University’s environmental and/or create more sustainable campus, it will instead help expand diversity, inclusivity, and equity in sustainability. Many times, theses historically underutilized business have suffered due to lack of access to money, markets, and management. We understand that as a student organization, it can be hard to provide monetary help. Therefore, by providing a space where these businesses can be exposed to a larger consumer base and generate revenue, we believe it will help expand the diversity of businesses being affiliated by the UW community.

 

Student Leadership & Involvement

Student Leadership and Involvement are the driving force behind the Eat Local Seattle Food Fair. UW supplier diversity is a student led organization that works with connecting students and local minority, women, and LGBTQ owned small businesses. Our Eat Local event will be powered not only by our vendors, but also by student volunteers that will be interacting and engaging with vendors and other UW students. Our student volunteers will be both educating and engaging students on the importance of diverse suppliers and asking them to sign the pledge to support theses locally small owned businesses. We also have other academics that are apart of UWSPD that will be creating posters about the history and background of each vendor and their road to become a business owner.

 

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

The Eat Local Seattle Food Fair, not only will this be an event where the UW community can purchase goods from vendors. We will also be including an educational component that will be in the form of tri-folds. There will be a tri-fold for each vendor that will include a biography and information on the business itself, in order to educate the community about their goods, background stories, and much more. Additionally, we will be including an outreach component through the form of supplier diversity pledge. The Supplier Diversity Pledge can be found on our website (uwsupplierdiversity.com), and was created by program participants with the purpose of gaining feasible metrics that will allows us to measure the support for our programs mission. We will have student volunteers staffing the event, and they will be asking the UW community to sign the pledge to show their support for the use of these historically underutilized businesses.  

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Aidan Jensen

TEDxUofW

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

 

TEDxUofW is a registered student organization established to bring inspirational and informative TED style talks from speakers in the community to the University of Washington. Since 2012, our organization has sought to give amazing speakers a receptive audience to share their passion. Our organization, purely student-run, has six years in a row had a sold-out event, gathering a collection of creative thinkers, scientific minds, community leaders, environmental activists, and many more. Our TEDx conference is one of the largest events on campus and has been a great opportunity to allow students to try their hand in fields of professional interest.

In the past, our conference has hosted multiple environmentally-minded speakers and we continue to strive to create a platform for messages about environmental as well as social sustainability. Given that TEDx was founded to facilitate “ideas worth spreading” including those that promote environmentally-friendly causes, we believe that our project directly aligns with CSF’s mission of fostering an environmentally conscious culture.

Everyone on the TEDxUofW team is extremely passionate about opening up our conference to everyone and anyone, but one limitation standing is the cost of attendance. With your help and sponsorship, we can reduce our ticket prices so we can spread more ideas to students that would have otherwise not been able to attend.Your support will allow us to share our conference with more people as well as continue to spread our message for years to come.

See below for additional information including our budget and other files outlining the details of the event.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Maya Gopalan

Keraton 2019

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $5,000

Letter of Intent:

Dear CSF Committee,

On behalf of the Indonesian Student Association at the University of Washington (ISAUW),  I am submitting this letter to notify the CSF of our intent to submit a funding request for our annual campus event, Keraton, on May 4th, 2019, at Rainier Vista at the University of Washington.

Keraton is one of the largest Indonesian cultural events in the West Coast. Over the past few years, Keraton has been ISAUW’s biggest and fastest growing annual event that attracted over 8,000 people in 2017. This year, we are expecting 10,000 individuals.

Through the years, we have dedicated our resources to reduce our environmental impact. Last year, through implementing “Keraton Going Green,” we made it our mission to require all vendors to use compostable food packaging. In addition, we informed all of our visitors of the locations of recycling and compost bins within the event location. This year, aside from implementing our previous methods, we plan to promote environmental awareness through a performance during the event. Our creative management department has been working towards this and we have also sent out an application for performers who would be interested in educating guests on environmental issues. We are optimistic that these performances, guests will be better informed on the current situation of our environment while also being entertained.

With the event being fully organized and managed by students, ISAUW develops students’ leadership and organizational skills by trusting each department with tasks that are critical to the event’s success. In addition, we accept volunteers and further create opportunities for students all-over the campus. Overall, students will be able to utilize and develop their communication skills by engaging with guests, learning about Indonesian culture, environmental issues, and gain meaningful connections.

Based on the financial figures from our previous Keraton events, ISAUW estimates a budget of $35,960. The amount has been partially covered by our fundraising events throughout the year. We have also been seeking support from various companies and businesses by offering sponsorship packages, and applying for other campus funds — such as the diversity fund and ASUW.

I will be our main point of contact throughout this application process, and can be reached at:

Thank you for giving ISAUW the opportunity to participate in the campus sustainability funding. We are looking forward to hearing from you soon.

 

Sincerely,

Kevin Hamonangan

 

President of ISAUW

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kevin Nathanael Hamonangan

Creating a Sustainable Night Market

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

Letter of Intent: Creating a Sustainable Night Market

Jan 5th, 2019

Justin Ho (justin.ho97@outlook.com)

 

  1. Summary of Project Proposal: There are three things TSA would like to accomplish with the funding. First, stop selling bottled water by selling reusable stainless steel or plastic bottles while providing water refill stations. Second, work with vendors to reduce non-recyclable or non-compostable cutlery and plates. Third, educate attendees about the importance of composting through signs and word of mouth.

 

  1. Sustainable Impact: The impact the funding will have is two pronged. Night Market inherently is a cultural event and is dedicated to providing an authentic Taiwanese Night Market experience. People from all walks of life are encouraged to attend Night Market and enjoy the good food and games provided. The funding will help to provide a greener Night Market through lasting change to the structure of the event.

 

The impact is also environmental. Through the first two goals listed in the summary TSA is attempting to create as plastic free of a night market as possible. Reducing or eliminating plastic waste generated by vendors as well as our own bottled water sales will go a long way as the event hosts approximately 9,000 people. Bottled water is also extremely harmful containing toxins while not proving higher quality to treated tap water. Furthermore, bottled water is often unsustainably manufactured through draining of rivers and lakes. These two changes will eliminate over 95% of plastic waste generated by Night Market. The last change of creating signs to place above compost bins will educate people about the importance of composting, and the benefit of backyard composting. Our volunteers and officers will also be well educated about the topic and be able to talk to attendees about the subject.

 

  1. Leadership & Student Involvement: TSA is a registered student organization. All sustainability efforts will be led and accomplished through students and volunteers. TSA and its member students will be the backbone of the event and incorporate the outlined sustainability efforts. Students plan and lead the entirety of the event.

 

  1. Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change: TSA will have created an educational element for the attendees through signs and other forms of advertisement conveying what is and isn’t compostable. As well as explaining the advantages of re-using sustainable water bottles over purchasing bottled water. The benefits of backyard compost will be advertised as well.

 

There is further outreach due to the use of volunteers to supplement our officers. Those volunteers will have participated in Night Market receiving the same exposure to sustainability efforts. All in all, there will be change in the sustainability behaviors of our own officers, the volunteers, and all attendees. Through word of mouth we then hope to reach even more.

 

  1. Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability: TSA has held an annual Night Market since 2001. This will be the 18th Night Market. In the previous 17 there has been constant improvement and change applied to the Night Market. Each time the officers have been able to adapt to change and pull through. We expect this year to be no different save a few changes to sustainability efforts. TSA has the ability to create a successful event made even greener. Our RSO advisor, Christina Coop, can attest to this. Any potentially awarded money will be used responsibly will a high chance of successful implementation. The future impact will be carried through to all future Night markets and have a lasting influence.
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Justin Ho

Vocal Theater Works Principal Production: Hydrogen Jukebox

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $8,000

Letter of Intent:

Vocal Theater Works Principle Production: Hydrogen Jukebox

              Within the School of Music, students of the Vocal Performance department are studying and performing Phillip Glass’ modern opera Hydrogen Jukebox in April 2019. This music theatre piece features a setting of Allen Ginsberg’s poetry, and presents issues of social and environmental justice and sustainability that America has grappled with in recent decades. Hydrogen Jukebox treats themes of environmental degradation, social injustice, and war. We in the Vocal Theatre Works program are excited to engage with and present a work that promotes social and cultural awareness through diverse and interdisciplinary collaboration.  

Like other forms of music theatre, vocal theatre is an interdisciplinary medium that draws on a variety of fields to create a cohesive piece of art. These include music, literature, dance, traditional theatre, and increasingly, science and technology. We believe that this uniquely inclusive medium is an ideal modality for students to apply their various academic and creative pursuits within the University. Our artform best uses resources when it engages a diverse segment of our academic peers at the University of Washington and the community at large.

During the 2017-2018 academic year, the vocal performance students produced Maurice Ravel’s L’enfant et les Sortilèges. In performing this work, our primary production goal was to build compassion and empathy within our community through performance. Colette’s libretto for L’enfant deals with the devastation left by the first World War and serves as a guide for the reparation of inter-community relationships shattered by carnage and hostility. Similarly, we believe we can bring greater awareness to issues of cultural and environmental sustainability by performing Glass’ Hydrogen Jukebox. Our performance of Hydrogen Jukebox, the work’s Seattle premiere, will highlight and promote discussion of the social struggles surrounding war, sexual liberation, and environmental degradation. Our performance will also enhance awareness of the works of Allen Ginsberg, an American poet who faced discrimination based on his sexual orientation. We believe that it is our responsibility to take a leadership role within the University by using the arts as a vehicle to engage our community in examining these important issues. American society has become increasingly divided over the past decades, and by highlighting messages of social responsibility and compassion, we engage our community with a model of cultural sustainability.

Visiting artist Deanne Meek and Professor Cyndia Sieden will serve as faculty mentors for this project. Our department has expressed robust support and enthusiasm for this project but is unable to allocate additional funds for this academic year. In addition to faculty support, we have procured the project management services of Jonathan Luk, who has served in roles as Director of Product and program management to assist in project management for this effort.

The students of Vocal Theatre Works request a Campus Sustainability Fund grant for our 2019 Hydrogen Jukebox production. We have already secured approximately $22,000 of our $30,000 budget and request your assistance in achieving our funding goal for this production. We will use the grant to bring respected leaders from the University and larger Seattle community to engage both the audience and students in discussion sessions. We will also invite these leaders into the Vocal Theatre Works production process to facilitate an analysis of Ginsberg’s poetry in the context of its musical setting in order to enhance interdisciplinary collaboration and its performance presentation. In addition, funds would be allocated towards general production costs, such as sets, costumes and projection equipment. A tentative budget is included with this letter of intent.

Points of Contact

Trevor Ainge, student development coordinator

aingetj@outlook.com | 206-698-4396

 

Deanne Meek, visiting artist

deannemeek@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

Budget

Vocal Theatre Works: Principal Production, 2019

Hydrogen Jukebox

Music by Philip Glass, Libretto by Allen Ginsberg

April 26 and 27, 2019 7:30 p.m. Meany Studio

 

VTW: Hydrogen Jukebox Estimated Expenses, 2019 Amount  
Music Direction, Coaching and Conducting $10,000  
Stage Direction, Production Coordinator, Fundraising/Development Associate $10,000  
Music licensing and parts rental $  1,050  
Sets and Costumes $  1,000  
Choreography        500  
Musical scores copy fees $     300  
Sound equipment, microphones $  1,000  
Development:  Receptions, Piano tuning $     400  
Pre-Post Performance Talk Backs or Panel Discussions $  2,000  
Projector and Projection costs/Design $  3,000  
Miscellaneous $    750  
     
Total Estimated Expenses: $30,000  

 

 

To date, approximately $22,000 has been raised to be designated for this project, with funding initiatives still in progress. 

 

Budget created by Deanne Meek, updated November, 2018

 

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Trevor Ainge

Africa Now 2019 Conference

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $10,000

Letter of Intent:

 

Summary:

In recognizing that current development projects are draining Africa of its natural resources, destroying its ecosystems, and exploiting its peoples, Africa Now is seeking $10,000 to assist in organizing our second annual conference focused on inspiring young Black students and professionals to join the movement for sustainable, afrocentric, African development. By tapping into the network of young, Black students and professionals in Washington, we will bring together an interdisciplinary group of driven individuals to assess how our skills can play a role in the sustainable growth of our common, ancestral homeland.

As this year marks the second year of this on-going conference, we will capitalize on the lessons learned from the inaugural year to make the 2019 conference a resounding success. One of our associated focuses is expanding our reach to increase the number and diversity of attendees. Towards this goal, we have enhanced our social media presence to establish continual channels of communication with our potential attendees. Additionally, we have strengthened existing and developed new relationships with local Black and African organizations (e.g. Africans at Microsoft, the Washington State Coalition of African Community Leaders, the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party, etc.) to grow our audience to include young African professionals in various disciplines.

Through community outreach and social media, we intend to double last years attendance rates to bring together over 200, young, Black students and professionals. Our goal, at the conference, is to provide these attendees with the insights, knowledge, and resources necessary to envision sustainable ways to improve their communities in Seattle, in Africa, and across the Diaspora. Through an all-star panel, dynamic breakout sessions, and networking, we’ll inspire and equip young Black professionals to fight for a sustainable future for Africa.

The conference will be held at the Intellectual House and Denny Hall on May 20th from 12pm - 6pm. Lunch and refreshments will be provided throughout the day.

Sustainable Impact:

Our primary goal is for attendees to explore strategies for sustainably developing their communities in Africa and throughout the African Diaspora. To Africa Now, sustainability means addressing the environmental, economic, social, and political aspects of Africa’s growth. We want our attendees to recognize that Africa is comprised of numerous, fragile ecosystems; that wealth inequality needs to be addressed urgently; that Africans throughout the Diaspora lack access to crucial health resources and are otherwise at risk; and that many African nation-states are politically unstable due to a history of colonialism and the current, neocolonial, capital-based pressures of foreign imperial powers. It is important, for the purposes of sustainability, that these realities are recognized by our attendees as we join the Fight for Africa’s Future.

Towards this, our conference will provide attendees with the knowledge, information, and resources to have a sustainable impact in their communities. One of our key ways of sharing this information will be through our breakout sessions. There will be four separate workshops taking place concurrently during our two breakout session phases. There will be one workshop dedicated to each of the different axes of sustainability: environmental, economic, social, and political. These sessions will be facilitated by groups or individuals paving a path forward in their respective area of focus. We have already heard from Front and Centered as well as the Releaf CEO, Isaiah Udutong, that they would be interested in hosting workshops for us.

Given their mission statement, “Front and Centered (formerly Communities of Color for Climate Justice) is a statewide coalition of organizations and groups rooted in communities of color and people with lower incomes,” Front and Centered will be a key resource for us when it comes to highlighting the importance of environmental sustainability and what that looks like.

Our other facilitator, Isaiah, is an MIT graduate with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. After graduating, Isaiah returned home to Nigeria where he started Releaf. Releaf is a start-up focused on “employing technology to accelerate agricultural-based industrialization in Nigeria.” Isaiah will bring his experience and expertise to Africa Now by running a workshop focused on using business institutions as vehicles for sustainable, economic development.

 

Student Leadership & Involvement:

As with last year, the Africa Now conference is organized entirely by African students from around the Seattle Area, primarily UW and Seattle Central College. However, unlike last year, the conference is no longer being hosted by Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity. The organizing committee recognized that it allowed us to better achieve our goals by transferring leadership from Phi Beta Sigma to the African Youth Coalition and a handful of Black/African student organizations (Black Student Union, African Student Association, Black Student Commission, etc.). We have also brought in student leaders from non-UW campuses around the area to ensure that we have a diverse group organizing this conference.

Our executive officers represent a variety of departments and student organizations from the Seattle area. The main University of Washington collaborators are the Black Student Commission, Black Student Union, and African Student Association among other Black/African student organizations in Seattle. By working with these various organizations, we will build solidarity among young Africans and establish an interdisciplinary community dedicated to sustainable, afrocentric African development. Furthermore, by collaborating with the CSF, we will be able to ensure that our conference makes sustainability a key outcome of the conference.

 

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change:

By collaborating with a wide variety of Black and African organizations in the greater Seattle area, we will expand our reach significantly to increase the number and diversity of attendees. To enhance these efforts, the organizing board established a new executive position, the Community Engagement Officer. This officer is responsible for coordinating with community organizations to ensure that they and the general public are aware of the conference. Additionally, we will host lead up events to stimulate interest in the campus community and encourage attendance so that they can experience the transformative nature of Africa NOW.

The young Black professionals that attend and actively engage with the conference will likely leave having their lives changed. After the inaugural conference, an attendee said that the Africa Now conference inspired them to not only change their major but their entire career path going forward! The hard work that the volunteers, panelists, and facilitators put into last years conference was felt by those that attended, and they left feeling energized to get more involved in their communities and fight for a just and sustainable future for Africa and the African Diaspora.

 

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability:

The feasibility of this project is best demonstrated by the first annual Africa Now conference, held in May 2018 with over 100 registered attendees. These attendees discussed ongoing African development with an engaging panel, participated in dynamic breakout sessions, and networked with fellow guests, community leaders, and others during our resource fair; conference guests gained knowledge, inspiration, and resources by attending Africa Now. The 2018 conference and its guests left us with plenty of lessons to learn and momentum to capitalize on to make the 2019 conference a resounding success

Based on last years feedback, we have enhanced our social media presence so that we can be held accountable to our past and present guests. By engaging with attendees, we can ensure that we provide them with the resources necessary to fight for a sustainable future for their communities in Seattle, Africa, and the African Diaspora. To aid our accountability, guests will also complete pre- and post-conference surveys so that we can gauge how successful we were at achieving ours goals.

With last years post conference surveys, we learned that - beyond increasing pre-conference engagement to increase attendance rates - we need to dedicate more energy to providing our conference guests/attendees with more resources so they can immediately get involved in the work of sustainable African development. Additionally, we need to ensure that the structure of our conference lends itself to being as engaging as possible.

Preliminary Budget:

We are requesting $10,000 from the Campus Sustainability Fund to help cover these conference costs.

Plates & Utensils $100
Tablecloths and Decorations $600
Flyers for UW & Other Campuses $400
Promo Media $400
250 Shirts $2,100
Program Booklets $250
Name Tags $100
Media - 2 photographers x 1 Videographer $800
Panelists (3 x $600 each) $1,800
Breakout Session speakers (4 x $500 each) $2,000
Live Band $400
Performance $500
Bus Vouchers for Students $250
250 Lanyards $300
Total $10,000

Outside of the CSF, we will be seeking funding from the Race and Equity Initiative, the ECC Student Event Fund, as well as community organizations (e.g. African Chamber of Commerce) and businesses.

 

Agenda:

The current conference agenda is as follows:

  • 11:00am-12:00pm      Registration
  • 12:00-12:20pm           Conference Introductions
  • 12:20 – 12:30pm        Transition
  • 12:30 – 1:10pm          Breakout session #1
  • 1:10 – 1:20pm      Transition
  • 1:20 – 2:00pm     Breakout Session #2
  • 2:00 – 3:00pm    Lunch and entertainment
  • 3:10 – 3:20pm      Transition to Panel
  • 3:20 – 4:00pm     Panel Discussion
  • 4:00 – 4:10pm            Transition
  • 4:10 – 4:40pm      Resource Fair
  • 4:40 – 5:00pm     Closing Comments
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Hawi Nemomssa
Supplementary Documents:

Black Student Union Legacy Soriee

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

 

Black Student Union’s 7th Annual Legacy Soiree

 

Letter of Intent:

Project Size: Small

Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF:

Max $1,000

 

Project Summary:

 

The primary purpose of The Legacy Soiree is to fundraise for our endowment fund, providing scholarships for underrepresented student at UW. This year's soiree, held in the Intellectual House, will involve a night of live music, musical performances from a prominent Seattle artist as well as dance performances including a stroll/step show from Black Greek organizations on campus. We will also honor/recognize exemplary Undergraduate,graduate, faculty and community member for their activism and contributions to the black community. Our program will also feature a keynote speaker that embodies our theme of "Envisioning Black History; Black and the Future". BSU will also be continuing their tradition of recognizing ten exemplary high school students with our Talented Ten Awards, in the hopes of inspiring them to attend the University of Washington. We will include a a catered dinner for our attendees. We hope to attract undergraduate, graduate, faculty and community members from the greater Seattle area to join us in recognizing and promoting black excellence both inside and outside of the classroom.

 

Estimated Project Budget: $9957.54 (See next page for budget breakdown)

 

Environmental/Sustainable Impact:

 

Our event primarily seeks to improve social sustainability of the UW campus as well as the greater Seattle area. We aim to do this through recognition of the achievements and contribution of underrepresented student and minority Community members in an effort to promote activism and community engagement. To improve environmental sustainability this event  support environmental education and awareness of environmental racism and justice as minority communities are disproportionately affected by pollution, toxic waste, carbon emissions and other adverse environmental conditions. By building up communities most affected this we can work to inspire young leaders and intellectuals to study and work to improving living systems in those communities.

 

Student Leadership & Involvement:

 

This event is a student initiated and student led project. Our advisers, Tiana Brawly of the ECC and Brian Tracy, provide guidance and support throughout this process. We, the executive board of the Black Student Union, consisting of ten undergraduate students, are in the process of planning and executing this event.

Our roles and duties include:

  • President/Program Coordinator - Salem Abraha
  • Treasurer/Budget Specialist/Fiscal Advisor - Safiya Bansfield
  • VP of Campus Affairs - Terrence Jones
  • VP of Community Affairs - Abigail Yemane
  • VP of Communications - Trisha Beavers
  • Secretary/Special Consultant - Sara Bekele
  • Chair of Outreach and Recruitment - Ebsitu Hassen
  • Senator - Sahra Ibrahim
  • SAB Representative - Tyler Valentine
  • Webmaster/Historian - Hassan Abdi

 

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change:

 

As mentioned above, a key part of our event is dedicated to recognizing the academic achievements of ten young minority high school students in the greater Seattle area in our Talented Ten ceremony. We spend months reaching out to high school to counselors and principals to recommend to us their stand out students. Once we have chosen these ten students, on the day of our soiree we give the students a tour the UW Seattle campus and share with them what it is like attending this university. These efforts are all in hopes of inspiring these young talented student to attend UW.  

 

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability:

 

The Black Student Union has successfully hosted this event in the past. This year will be our 7th annual Legacy Soiree. Our advisers, Tiana Brawly, staff member of the ECC and Brian Tracy, a UW Alumni, provide guidance, support, and mentorship throughout this process. Jon Solomon is our SAO adviser. We will also be consulting previous BSU executive board members. This executive board has successfully planned and hosted an Art Showcase last October and we plan to use the skills we have learned in the process to this project.

Contact information:

 

Event Budget Planning Worksheet  
       
Item Total Cost Requested Funds Source
Venue $910.00 $910.00 ECC SDEF Co-Sponsorship
Honoraria $637.00 $637.00 Alumni Association + ASUW Special Appropriations (137)
       
Program      
Band $750 $750 GPSS Special Allocations
Keynote $3,000 $3,000 Wells Fargo + ASUW Special Appropriations(1000) + CSF Mini Grant
Decorations $200.00 $200.00 GPSS Diversity
Programs $200 $90 ECC SDEF Co-Sponsorship
Photographer $0    
Performer $600.00 $600.00 GPSS DIversity + BSC
Program Total $4,750 $4,640  
       
Dinner      
Dinnerware/Table Cloth $363 $363 ASUW Special Appropriations
Dessert $300    
Catering $2,998    
Food Total $3,661 $363  
TOTALS $9,957.54 $6,550.00  

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Safiya Bansfield

Gardening with Electric Bikes

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $84,888

Letter of Intent:

The University of Washington contains one of the premier campuses in the country. Grounds Management at the University of Washington currently contains 19 vehicles that run on gas including various trucks and gators (small utility vehicles). These vehicles are used throughout campus on a variety of jobs aimed to improve the campus’s aesthetics. On average, the vehicles used by grounds management burn 6,000 gallons of gas a year which release 120,000 pounds of C02 into the atmosphere.

Climate change is one of the biggest problems facing our planet today. In 2016, transportation contributed up to 28.5 percent of the damage (Epa.gov). As one of the country’s leading institutions, it is the University of Washington’s obligation to lead the charge in the fight against climate change. Grounds maintenance is an area that burns a significant amount of fossil fuels. Finding ways to keep the productivity of grounds management high, while reducing its fossil fuel consumption is currently a high priority. Reducing our reliance on fossil fuels while keeping our productivity high will show other Universities that going green can be financially advantageous.

Our goal is to vastly decrease the carbon footprint of Grounds Management on campus by reducing our reliance on vehicles that burn fossil fuels. The majority of jobs completed by Grounds Management can be accomplished without the need of high consumption vehicles (such as the trucks and gasoline powered utility vehicles supplied to the gardeners). We would like to add electric E-Bikes to our green fleet which already includes three electric club cars. Recently, a grant was received by UW Mailing services which provided them with an E-Bicycle-Mail & Package Delivery Program. This grant has been extremely successful and it is a desire of Grounds Management to emulate its success. Although a truck will be required for the occasional job, we are proposing to reduce our reliance on them with the goal of using 2,000 less gallons of gasoline per year. The reduction of 2,000 gallons of gas per year will decrease the amount of C02 put into the atmosphere by 40,000 pounds and will save grounds management $6,000 dollars per year (at $3 per gallon of gasoline).  Over time we will review how many trucks are used per day and the amount of gas we have reduced through this program. Grounds management consists of nine crews each consisting of two vehicles. We propose to reduce the crew’s reliance on these vehicles by supplying each crew with an electric hatchback bicycle and two bicycles to be shared throughout the shop (11 total). Of these 11 vehicles, 9 will be electric with a hatchback, and two will be small fold up electric bikes (for attending meetings and other non-laborious tasks). We will also require miscellaneous accessory items such as helmets and u-locks.

This would be one of the first University Grounds Management Operations to run predominately on electric and man powered vehicles.
 
This project will look to involve students in all of its facets. The project is currently facilitated by a graduate student research assistant from the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences with the title Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Sustainability Coordinator. The IPM and Sustainability Coordinator will attend sustainability events and will develop educational and outreach components for the program. The graduate student will be responsible for record keeping, costs and the productivity of the project.

In addition to the graduate student involvement, this project will utilize the UW Engineers without Borders program. The salvage wood project through grounds management was extremely successful in main part due to the collaboration with UW Engineers without Borders. Similar to the salvage wood project, (run by Grounds Management) the UW Engineer students will contribute to the project by building multiple required structures. For example these students will build the shed for bike storage and the trailers attached to the bikes. We will also team up with art students to paint the bike trailers with the CSF logo incorporated into the design.

The E-Bicycle Mail & Package Delivery Program established a partnership with the HUB Graphic Design Office where student employees created the designs for our education outreach material. We will look to expand this partnership to include grounds management. Overall, this project will include students from multiple facets of campus including the College of BuilT\t Environments, the School of Art, and the school of Art History and Design.
 
Below you will find an estimate of costs associated with this project. Including the bicycles, annual maintenance costs, and bicycle supplies, the amount requested from CSF totals to $84,888.

We have been in contact with the company Electric & Folding Bikes Northwest. We have come to the conclusion that the bikes most suited for our needs are the Specialized Como 2.0 Electric bikes and the Gocycle electric folding bike. 

We’ve included 5 years of maintenance in this proposal through an annual bike maintenance fee.  After which, the UW Grounds Shop will assume responsibility for maintenance.     
 
Thank you for your consideration in this proposal!  

Budget: 

 

Item Cost per Item Quantity Total Cost
Initial Costs for Bikes and Trailers      
Specialized como 2.0 Electric Bikes (w/ one year of service) including tax 2,850 9 56,258
 Rear Cargo Boxes with Trailers 2,428 9 21,854
Gocycle Electric folding bicycle 3,082 2 6,164
Total     64,270
       
Annual Maintenance Costs including supplies 1475 5 7,375
   
Rain Caps 50 6 300
Water Resistant Gloves 100 6 600
Helmet 100 11 1,100
Kryptonite standard U-Lock 100 12 1,200
Storage Shed 6,000 1 6,000
Total     16,575
       
Project Subtotal     80,845
Contingency Fee (5%)     4,043
       
Project Total     84,888
 
     

ESTIMATE: Project Completion Total: 

$84,888

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Michael Bradshaw

University of Washington Precious Plastic

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF:

Letter of Intent:

Campus Sustainability Fund: Letter of Intent Project

Title: University of Washington Precious Plastic Project

Summary: Inspired by Dave Hakken's project, Precious Plastic, we plan to build a plastic recycling workspace on University of Washington’s campus, using the free machine blueprints and online resources from preciousplastic.com. The workspace will consist of four machines which shred, melt, compress, and mold used plastic, so it can be transformed into something new. This workspace is designed to be cross-disciplinary, providing raw material to arts and science students for 3D printing, construction projects, and as a sculptural medium. Sale of recycled plastic filament and finished products can reduce costs for University departments and create a revenue stream to self-fund Precious Plastics operations. This project would generate opportunities for research on campus waste and sustainability measures, or it could be utilized as a lab space for faculty and their classes or as culminating projects for students’ theses.

Environmental Impact: According to Earthday.org/2018, nine billion tons of plastic have been made since the 1950s, and every piece of plastic ever made still exists in one form or another. Less than five percent of the world’s plastic is recycled, and over 90 percent of the garbage floating in the ocean is plastic. This plastic ends up in one of the five garbage gyres in the middle of the ocean, pollutes beaches around the world, or gets consumed by animals, which either kills them or eventually introduces these chemical toxins and bacteria into our food chain.

On January 1st of 2018, China—which, in 2016, processed 7.3 million tons of waste[1]—banned importing recyclables from outside countries. With no strong market for scrap plastics, municipalities all over the U.S., Canada, and Europe are now forced to divert these reusable materials to landfills, and governments are scrambling to find a sustainable solution as landfills become overfilled. Putting pressure on America’s recycling system, this new development creates an opportunity for organizations to create innovative solutions and build domestic markets for these materials.

With a campus of over 43,000 students (not including faculty or staff), the University of Washington creates a lot of waste—roughly 11.7 tons in 2016, of which only 63 percent was recycled or diverted from landfills[2]—and our mixed recycling often ends up being delivered to landfills, without being properly recycled. The Precious Plastics program would result in four impacts on the UW Seattle Campus:

1) Waste Diversion: By reducing the amount of plastic that leaves the campus for an unknown fate, UW can reduce the strain on our waste streams and landfills. This project could also help UW Recycling meet its quarterly waste diversion goals. We expect this process will help UW Recycling meet its goal of 70% waste diversion by 2020.[3] While output data from other Precious Plastic projects is limited, we estimate that, when fully operational, we will process approximately 1.5 tons of plastic a year.[4]

2) Waste Reduction: Education can lead to behavioral changes. Allowing students to take a tour of our workspace, they can learn about the recycling process and the amount of work it takes to breakdown plastics, which could encourage these students to develop more sustainable habits or to make smarter choices when purchasing goods.

3) Conserving Resources. UW can reduce its purchasing of and dependence on virgin materials and help protect our natural resources by creating a closed-loop recycling system on plastic waste.

4) Reducing Carbon Emissions and Pollution. Diverting waste reduces the amount of carbon emissions burned transporting this trash to recycling facilities and to landfills. It also reduces the need to refine and process raw materials, which creates substantial water and air pollution. Despite growing impact of UW Recycling programs, UW net greenhouse gas emissions show growth year over year. This project will contribute to reigning in emissions generated by the University.[5

Student Leadership/Involvement: With student interest from a wide range of departments around campus, leadership for this project primarily stems from GreenEvans, a UW Registered Student Organization (RSO) from the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance. Graduate students from this program include Emily Coleman, Katy Ricchiuto, Claire Baron Katherine Walton, and Micah Stanovsky. The undergraduate members are Isabella Castro, Sierra Schonberg, Oliver Kou, Emma Turner, David Frantz, Alishia Orloff, Alexis Neumann, and Mason Clugston.

Education, Outreach & Behavior Change: Our leadership will conduct presentations in undergraduate and graduate classes to raise awareness about the project and increase student involvement. We will also reach out to FIGs, organization, and clubs around UW’s campus—such as Comotion and the Department of Biology’s WOOF Club—which would have an interest in this project. At Earth Day 2019, we hope to demonstrate the machines’ capabilities and produce items for the event made from recycled plastic.

The UW Recycling department supports this project and will assist in the collection of plastics. Collection bins, placed around campus, will feature education materials about the project and the environmental issues with plastic. Outreach efforts will engage faculty for class labs or field trips, and students for thesis projects or other research. We will evaluate our program by tracking the project’s costs, processes, outcomes, and impacts. This data will allow UW to act as a leader within our community and to exemplify innovation by sharing knowledge with other schools and organizations hoping to develop their own small-scale recycling facilities.

Feasibility, Accountability & Accessibility: This project will take place in several stages, each with varying degrees of complexity and feasibility.

1)  Site location: Before submitting our full proposal in the Fall 2018, we will vet and choose a location to house the machines and workspace. We will investigate four possible models for this space:

a. Customize a shipping container workshop to locate on campus.

b. Partner with an existing co-making or lab space on campus. This option would drive down project costs.

c. Operate within an existing annex or similar space on campus. This option would drive down project costs.

d. Customize a box truck as a mobile recycling workshop.

2)  Build the Machines: The free blueprints for these machines make them very cost effective and feasible to produce. Whenever possible, we will outsource labor to students to reduce expenses and source scrap materials, keeping the costs and carbon footprint of this project low.

3)  Write Safety Protocols: We will collaborate with EH&S to mitigate any safety concerns and create safety training for operators.

4)  Develop Operating and Maintenance Protocols: Before starting production, our leadership will gain use and maintenance knowledge of the machines. We will also develop sorting and washing standards for the plastics. Once we have command over the machines and process, our team will create a written manual and standardized training to educate other users.

5)  Create Product Prototypes: Our team will develop standard work for the production of 3D printer filament and a selection of compressed products.

6)  Outreach and Education: Once we accomplish the previous steps, we will open our workspace to the UW community—allowing students to use our resources for projects, offering tours for facility and their students, and encouraging other members within the broader Seattle community to learn from our project.

7)  Revenue-Generating Production: In the final stage of Precious Plastic, we envision sustaining the workspace, covering expenses through the sales of 3D printer filament at a reduced cost to other campus departments and products we create to sell to the public. We will work with clubs and organizations around campus to develop innovative ways to reuse the plastic we collect and divert from the UW’s waste stream.

 

Budget Estimate: $50,000 - $75,000 for setup and a year of operation. Cost will vary depending on site location.

 

Leadership Team:

Blair Kaufer, UW Facilities Services, Blairk2@uw.edu

GreenEvans (Registered Student Organization)

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Blair Kaufer

Campus Affiliation: UW Facilities Services, Payroll Coordinator

Campus Address: 3900 7th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98195

Phone: 206.221.4350

E-mail: Blairk2@uw.edu

 

Secondary Contact First & Last Name: Emily Coleman

Campus Affiliation: Master of Public Administration Graduate Student

Address: 6367 NE Radford Ave #4022, Seattle WA 98115

Phone: 414.378.1356

E-mail: ercole3@uw.edu

 

 

[1] Freytas-tamura, Kimiko De. “Plastics Pile Up as China Refuses to Take the West's Recycling.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 11 Jan. 2018, www.nytimes.com/2018/01/11/world/china-recyclables-ban.html.

[2] UW Recycling Annual Report 2016. Page 4.

https://facilities.uw.edu/files/media/uw-recycling-annual-report-2016.pdf

[3] UW Recycling Annual Report 2016. Page 2.

https://facilities.uw.edu/files/media/uw-recycling-annual-report-2016.pdf

[4] Our conservative estimate is based off a processing rate of 2 kilograms of plastic per hour, 15 hours a week and 48 weeks a year.

[5] UW Recycling Annual Report 2016. Page 7.

https://facilities.uw.edu/files/media/uw-recycling-annual-report-2016.pdf

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Blair Kaufer

Double Dip Conference

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

 

Summary

 

Diversity in Psychology is an RSO that was created in response to the alarming lack of diversity and representation in the field of Psychology, and specifically within the Psychology department at the University of Washington. Our founding members noticed the large emphasis of the experiences of White people as the center of many class discussions as well as in media representations of mental health and mental illness. We established this RSO in order to tackle some of these issues of representation and education, and used this momentum to shape our first meetings around topics that bridged social in/justice and Psychology. We have led many community conversations about Microaggressions, Impostor Syndrome, our own “Seattle Affective Disorder”, and a discussion about “The Mis-Education of Mental Illness”, which focused on breaking the stigma that mental health and therapy aren’t for people of color. Through our meetings, we aim to create a focused group of students of color in the field.

One aspect of our organization is connecting with members and groups in our community, and so we decided to extend our goals and ideas to high school students in the King County area who identify as people of color and who are interested in Psychology.This conference will be centered on familiarizing students with life at the University of Washington and highlighting the importance of people like them in the field. We aim to start this conversation at a young age because these students are most likely developing their identities and figuring out their part in society.

The conference will be an all-day event, beginning at 9am and commencing around 4:30 pm. The day will consist of a Keynote speaker, a series of breakout sessions & workshops, lunch, an RSO fair, and a campus tour. We hope to have students leave the conference a little less nervous about attending college and inspired and educated on the diverse field of Psychology.

 

Date: Saturday, November 10th 2018

Time: 9am-4:30pm

Location: Samuel E. Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center

 

Conference Timeline:

9:00-9:30 - Registration + light breakfast
9:30-9:40 Transition to large room
9:40-9:45 Introduce DIP, Conference, Timeline and Speaker
9:45-10:00 Keynote Speaker
10:00-10:10 - Explain breakout sessions and transition to rooms
10:15-11:15 Break out 1
11:15-11:25 Transition
11:30-12:30 Break Out 2
12:35-1:30 Lunch, RSO tabling fair, sorority/frat showcase
1:30-1:40 Transition
1:45-2:45 Break out 3
2:45-2:55 Transition
3:00-4:00 Break Out 4
4:00-4:30 Group Picture and Ending Remarks in Unity Room

 

Break out session Workshops (4):

  • The Importance of POC in Psychology/Psychological Research - Led by UW Psychology graduate students
  • Transitioning from High School to College - Led by UW Counseling Center
  • Admissions 101 workshop (topic is still tentative, but this is what has been currently agreed on) - Led by the Dream Project
  • Campus Tour - Led by OMAD Student Ambassadors. We also want to incorporate a diversity and sustainability centered tour of the UW Campus. We are working with CSF staff members and ECC staff members to accomplish this.

 

RSOs for RSO Fair

  • We want to showcase RSOs that center on diversity, as well as RSOs involved in Psychology, Mental Health, and related fields.
  • Additionally, we plan to showcase multicultural Greek Life (UW National Pan-Hellenic Council, United Greek Council) to get students excited about Greek Life that may be more relevant to their cultural backgrounds.

 

Keynote Speaker - A meeting with Professor Lynne Manzo is in the works. Professor Manzo is an Environmental Psychologist and we feel she can not only offer a perspective into an interesting field of Psychology, but also speak to the importance of understanding psychological impacts of environmental injustices which people of color face at alarming rates.

 

Lead RSO- Diversity in Psychology

 

Budget - $1000 requested from CSF

 

  • Room Fees
    • Samuel E. Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center - Unity Room + 4 breakout rooms; non-affiliated RSO ($377)
  • Materials/Promotional Items
    • 150 T-Shirts with Double Dip Logo ($700)
    • 110 Tote Bags with Logo ($210)
    • 150 Lanyards ($256)
    • Bus Vouchers for Students ($250)

 

Project Planning Timeline

 

September 17th-November 9th: Weekly board meetings centered on Conference planning

 

  • Week of September 17th
    • Check in
    • Assign new tasks for Fall Quarter;
    • Schedule meetings with Faculty Advisor, UW Admissions, Dean Taylor & Dr. Suite, and workshop leaders
    • Compile list of RSOs for RSO Fair and sending out emails
    • Find campus tour guides
    • Create T-shirt,lanyard, and tote bag designs
    • Send invitation emails to new list of high school contacts + potential sponsors
    • Contact caterer (Subway)
    • Meet with Dream Project
  • Week of September 24th
    • Check in
    • Confirm caterer
    • Meet with Faculty Advisor; meet with UW Admissions to schedule high school visits; meet with Dean Taylor & Denzil Suite
    • Increase RSO outreach efforts
    • Increase high school student outreach efforts
  • Week of October 8th
    • Check in
    • Meet with workshop leaders to discuss workshops by this week
    • Finalize KeyNote Speaker
    • Confirm RSO list; send out informational emails to RSOs
  • Week of October 15th
    • Check in
    • Meet with Faculty Advisor
    • Confirm Workshop topics and schedule
  • Week of October 22nd
    • Check in
    • Pay ECC reservation fee
    • Last minute high school
    • Close registration (10/26) and finalize/confirm conference attendance
    • Order T-Shirts, lanyards, and tote bags
  • Week of October 29th
    • Check in
    • Meet with Faculty Advisor
    • Potentially leave registration open until 11/2
  • Week of November 5th
    • Check in
    • Finalize conference details and technicalities, set up ECC; meet with RSO fair participants, workshop leaders, volunteers
    • Send out informational emails to high school students

 

Environmental Impact

 

Most Psychological research that is studied in Colleges and Universities has been done by White people, on White people, and most likely for White people. Findings have been applied to “other” groups, like people of color, without taking into account cultural differences or other ways of living. Or, when research does mention various cultural groups, they are brought up as the antithesis or exception. Further, mental health and illness are thought to be arenas for wealthy White individuals. This is clear after a simple Google search of “therapist” or “therapy”. Attending the University of Washington and majoring in Psychology will also give off that information. PSYCH classes are typically taught by White professors and most students in class are White. Most of the psychologists and researchers that students learn about are White, and their subjects are largely White.

However, there has been research on topics such as representation. Different studies show that schools with more Black teachers or even a Black principal increase the amount of Black students in gifted programs. From the direct experience of Diversity in Psychology’s founding members, as well as from many other people of color, it becomes much easier to feel as one belongs in a group or school when there are other people that look like you. Studies show that belongingness is crucial to development, academic performance, and many other positive outcomes.

One of the immediate goals of the Double Dip Conference is to provide this representation to high school students. We feel that because the larger field of Psychology lacks much diverse representation, the study and faith in Psychology is lacking in many communities that have been historically underserved and neglected. We hope that if  students see other students, leaders, professors, alumni, and advisors that reflect themselves, they can easily imagine themselves at the University of Washington and as future Psychology professionals. Additionally, we hope to present the idea of attending a university as exciting and attainable for these students. We want to provide them with resources and a network of support for their future college endeavors. Expanding the community that Diversity in Psychology has created to high school students is also a goal of the Conference.

Further, along with the values of our RSO, our team hopes to broaden the conversation around what Psychology can mean. While the field historically lacks much racial representation, issues such as racism and discrimination are intensely intertwined in various Psychological topics and areas of study. This being said, we plan to include an environmental aspect in our conference. Given the low amounts of racial diversity at the University of Washington, Seattle, and largely the whole state of Washington, it is important to note how environmental injustices are rooted in racism and that they impact certain groups in many ways. In a virtually racially-segregated city like Seattle, that is undergoing much change, a conversation and understanding about issues such as environmental racism is crucial. Professor Lynne Manzo, an Environmental Psychologist, will be able to speak on this topic. We want students to understand that Psychology is more than being a “shrink”, “listening to people’s problems”, or “diagnosing everyone you meet”. Psychology can also mean seeing and understanding deeply rooted systems of injustice and the avenues through which they are sustained.

Our larger goals are to increase diversity in the Psychology department at UW and in the broader field. Showcasing actual diversity in Psychology at this conference, educating students on the importance of people like them in this field, and familiarizing students with resources on campus will build a strong and focused group of future applicants to the school. This conference will start a domino effect and grow bigger and better with every year.

 

Education & Outreach

 

We have been working with the Office of Multicultural Outreach and Recruitment, the Dream Project, and UW Admissions to spread the word to high schoolers. Because our target group is high school students, we have been working with these offices to share our marketing information (description of the event + event flyer + registration link) to their high school contacts. Through our various organized meetings and discussions, we have met members of the greater community that are also forwarding our conference details to various high schools and students in the area.

We plan to host this conference at the UW, in the Samuel E. Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center. Not only is the ECC a great resource for students of color at UW, but it is a great network of people to work with for this conference. We hope to collaborate and share ideas on how to best serve our audience.

Through the various workshops and discussions, we plan to exhibit the diversity of the field of Psychology. That means highlighting the many different areas of research, job opportunities and career paths, and why it is importance for the field to consist of diverse individuals & groups. We can hopefully start a trend of positive change and start the very important conversation about Psychology in marginalized groups and communities.

 

Student Involvement

 

All of our board members will be involved in the Conference. Members are taking leadership roles with advertising, conference planning, and student outreach, and some will also take charge in creating merchandise and other materials for the event. In addition to our own team, we plan to collaborate with other student leaders involved in the Dream Project, Admissions, Psychology graduate students, and professors and faculty in the field. These individuals and groups will lead the workshops that the high school students will attend throughout the day. We also look forward to collaborating with different RSOs that center on diversity and/or Psychology to participate in an RSO fair during the event.

 

Accountability & Feasibility

 

Diversity in Psychology’s executive board has been on top of planning and communicating in regard to the Conference. Since Spring Quarter of 2018, we have had various meetings where items such as fundraising and conference planning were talked about and executed. Our previous board was very passionate about the Conference and we have solidified many aspects already. We will have merchandise donated from the UW Bookstore, snack donations from a local bakery, and have confirmed collaborations with the Dream Project, the Counseling Center, and UW Psychology graduate students to lead different sessions throughout the day. A flyer (with a conference logo) and informational letter have both been created to send out to high school counselors and students

For marketing and outreach, we have been working closely with the Multicultural Outreach and Recruitment Office (MOR) to reach out to students and high schools in the King County area. Additionally, we have reached out to personal and community contacts that have access to these populations as well in order to advertise and invite students to the conference. We have a goal of 100 students, and so far have about 50 confirmed via our registration link. Now that school is starting up again, we will expand our invitations and reach out to even more high schools. Additionally, the Dream Project will also be spreading the word to their high school connections.

Over the summer, our new executive board has met for a few in-person meetings but have been communicating virtually for the most part. The new board has become familiar with the conference and tasks have been assigned to each member, ranging from taking charge on merchandise and marketing materials to sending out email invitations. When the school year begins, we will continue to meet once to twice weekly to check in with each other and our assigned tasks. We will also continue check-ins with our faculty advisor and our other sources of assistance from UW Admissions and MOR.

We have also met with and been in constant communication with our faculty advisor in the Psychology Advising Office. She has helped us with getting financial backing from the Psychology Department and connected us with the graduate students who will be leading sessions.

The conference has the support of Dr. Denzil Suite, the VP of Student Life. He has a background in Psychology and is thrilled to see a conference like ours coming to fruition. Additionally, Ed Taylor, Dean of Undergraduate Affairs, has also agreed to support the conference financially. Similarly, he has a background in Psychology and shares Dr. Suite’s excitement and passion.

Of course, if awarded money, we are more than thrilled to work with the CSF to discussing alternative ways of reaching high school students and ways to improve any ideas regarding the conference. We would love to talk about ways to make the conference even more cost-efficient.

Our team members are confident that this conference will pave the way for more to come and widen the conversation about diversity in the field of Psychology.

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Ayala Feder-Haugabook

Healthy building certification for the UW Tower – education and demonstration

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $999

Letter of Intent:

Summary of project proposal: The student team would like to use the UW Tower, in particular, the newly renovated UW-IT space to demonstrate how to create a healthy workplace. Students in Professor Kim’s CESI 599 course will participate in a quarter long measurement and verification of indoor air quality, light, and other comfort criteria in addition to identifying and documenting relevant strategies that promote healthy workspace. The end product is to use the narratives as support documents to certify the newly renovated UW IT space as the possible Fitwel building. Fitwel is a nationally recognized certification system (similar to U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design system). If UW Tower is granted the certification, it would be the first building on campus to be a Fitwel space.   ​​​Environmental impact: The proposed project is part of the series needed to pursue the first healthy building certification at UW campus. The assessment that students will conduct includes evaluating performance metrics of healthy building standards for UW-IT space at UW Tower, such as air quality, water quality, light and comfort. It is expected that the presentation of the findings will motivate pro-environmental behavior to the building occupants, students and UW campus in general. Furthermore, the project will also demonstrate the importance of the indoor environmental quality and thus promote health-conscious individual behavior based on the measurable parameters. The bigger impact of this project is expected beyond addressing sustainability when the space successfully obtains healthy building certification and become the example for other buildings across the campus

Student Leadership & Involvement: CESI 599 requires that students are actively involved in the entire certification process. The class represents a wide diversity in terms of the students’ demographics from many different countries, as well as promotes interdisciplinary collaboration where the students come from different majors and departments within UW. Student groups will be responsible for documenting the findings as well as doing a presentation in front of all the stakeholders. The funding is requested to hold a whole building occupant presentation in the UW Tower auditorium which will be a unique experience.

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change: Having the all occupant presentation will be a great opportunity to reach out the employees of this University. We will discuss (and have the opportunity to educate) the benefits of good air quality, lighting, and comfort in terms of occupant benefits and improved productivity. In addition, the students will obtain a hands-on experience with daysimeter to learn one of the cutting-edge tools to measure light and health of the occupant.

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability: The requested budget does not cover all the measurement and verification needed for truly demonstrating the performance of a healthy workspace. However, Professor Kim (through her class) will be supporting relevant equipment that may be already available through her lab. She will also provide the necessary oversight. We are asking to supplement by acquiring daysimeter (to measure healthy/circadian light) to enrich the experience and make the assessment more comprehensive.

Project’s budget estimate and schedule: We are asking for $998.50 in total. $338.50 will be spent on presenting at the UW Tower auditorium ($300 for auditorium rental fee and $38.50 for audiovisual) and $660 on daysimeter. We expect to acquire daysimeter before the scheduled CEE 599 about lighting topic on October 30th, 2018. The presentation at the UW Tower auditorium will be on December 6th, 2018.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Lysandra A. Medal

Life Sciences Building Rooftop Solar Array - Supplementary

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $50,000

Letter of Intent:

CSF LETTER OF INTENT:

LIFE SCIENCES BUILDING ROOFTOP SOLAR ARRAY (2)

 

  1. INTRODUCTION

UW-Solar is working with the University of Washington (UW) and project architects, Perkins+Will, on the construction of UW’s Life Sciences Building (LSB). UW-Solar contributed to the installation of building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) panels on the façade of the building. The student group is now advocating for the installation of a 100 kW on the rooftop of the LSB upon completion of the building, scheduled for Fall 2018. We have already secured $150,000 in previous funding from the Campus Sustainability Fund (CSF) for the project, received a generous $100,000 donation from a charitable organization, and are requesting an additional $50,000 from CSF for the project, through the new Student Technology Fee (STF) partnership with CSF.

 

SUMMARY

 

2.1 UW-SOLAR SUMMARY

UW-Solar is an interdisciplinary team within the University of Washington’s Urban Infrastructure Laboratory that focuses on the development of solar installations with accompanying Industrial Control Systems on buildings on the UW campus. UW-Solar students range from undergraduate to the Ph.D. level within the Colleges of Engineering, Business, Built Environments, and Environmental Sciences. UW-Solar’s primary objective is to provide clean, sustainable power production to reduce the University of Washington’s reliance on external energy resources, improve power systems’ resilience to outages, and reduce the overall carbon footprint of the university. The usage of clean and renewable energy sources are a primary objective of the University of Washington’s Climate Action plan for the future sustainability of the University.

 

2.2 PROJECT SUMMARY

UW is working with Perkins+Will to construct the new Life Science Building. The implementation of a roof-top PV array will enhance the energy generation of the existing design, bringing the project closer to achieving LEED-NC Platinum certification. Power generation from solar energy has been achieved with the construction of BIPV fins on the southeast façade, but the addition of standard photovoltaic (PV) panels on the roof of the building would allow for far greater harvesting of the solar resource.

 

In Spring 2017, CSF approved $150,000 in funding for a combined pool that was meant to cover the $600,000 in costs for both the rooftop PV system and the BIPV panels. Unfortunately, we were unable to secure the remaining $450,000 because many of our historical funding sources became unavailable within the current political climate. As such we chose to abandon pursuing funding for the BIPV fins and have focused exclusively on the the rooftop PV system.

 

In July 2018, we were informed by Devin Kleiner of Perkins+Will that a generous donor was willing to contribute $100,000 to the construction of the rooftop PV system. The original CSF funding combined with the matching donation brings our current budget to $250,000. We are thus requesting an additional $50,000 in order to fully build out our designed 100 kW array on the LSB.

 

This project has been in development since Fall of 2016. As such, we have already completed the design for the project, estimated costs and power generation, and have begun a draft Request for Proposal (RFP) to be submitted to UW Capital Projects & Development.

 

We are hoping this project can be supported by the new STF partnership with CSF. The development of clean energy on campus aligns itself with the goals of the STF. This rooftop PV system would provide positive environmental and financial impacts for the University, provide opportunities for students of UW-Solar to work on an engineering and construction project, and promotes sustainability initiatives on campus with a visible and highly-publicized student project.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

The addition of photovoltaics to the Life Sciences Building will have a positive impact on the environment through the on-site production of renewable energy, which will both reduce the carbon-footprint of the building and increase its energy self-sufficiency.

 

As of March 2017, the was enough rooftop space reserved for a 100 kW solar array, or approximately 335 standard panels. Using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's PVWatts calculator (https://pvwatts.nrel.gov/), this array would generate approximately 105,000 kWh/year. According to the EPA Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies calculator, that is equivalent to upwards of 78 metric tons of CO2e. This is comparable to the carbon generated from:

 

  • 9,000 gallons of gasoline
  • 86,000 pounds of coal
  • 185 barrels of oil

 

STUDENT LEADERSHIP & INVOLVEMENT

The inclusion of renewable technologies on the Life Sciences Building has been spearheaded by students of UW-Solar since the Fall of 2015. The students working on this project have had opportunities to interact and work with architects from Perkins+Will, contractors from Skanska, and professionals working at the UW.

 

Numerous updates are necessary before our RFP can be submitted. Luckily, new and returning members of UW-Solar will be available this fall quarter to address these tasks. Students involved in this project will learn:

  • Reading and interpreting construction documents
  • Revising our original design to match the As-Built documents for the rooftop
  • Cost and energy performance estimating

 

Students will also get the opportunity to select a contracting firm to award the bid using an unbiased, multicriteria analysis. As one criteria, we are including a section within our RFP wherein the contracting firm must propose a “student education and inclusion” plan. This plan should give students the opportunity to tour a construction site, learn from professionals about solar installation, and participating in the commissioning process upon successful construction of the project.

 

EDUCATION AND OUTREACH

The rooftop array will be installed with a Supervisory Controls and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system. This system would record performance data from each individual panel, which allows for design optimization and simplifies maintenance. In addition, this system stores the performance data, which can be analyzed and presented. A virtual dashboard displaying energy metrics of the LSB will be placed within the 1st floor lobby space. Our SCADA system would be incorporated into the presentation for this dashboard. Students and visitors would be able to interact with the dashboard and explore the building’s energy metrics and sustainable features, including the energy provided by the rooftop array.

 

The unique aspects of this project make the LSB a leading example of sustainability in higher education and demonstrates the University’s commitment to investing in alternative energy sources. The project has been highly publicized, and the addition of a large rooftop solar array would certainly garner attention from news sources and the student body. This could also serve as a flagship project to highlight the new partnership between the CSF and the STF.

 

ACCOUNTABILITY

UW-Solar has investigated ongoing accountability for management and maintenance of the solar installations, as well as long-term leadership considerations for the project as it relates to executive stakeholders, logistical management, and staffing and budget impacts of relevant stakeholder organizations.

 

ESTIMATED BUDGET

The following table is a cost estimate for the rooftop array. The budget is meant to be an estimate and will be revised by our contractor bids. Please see the key below for explanation.

Infrastructure Cost ($) IT Cost ($)
Panels 80,000* Inverters 50,000*
Wiring 15,000* Metering 7,000***
Racking System 10,000*** Weather Station 500***
Labor 100,000** Transformer 2,500***
Permitting 500*** IT equipment 4,000***
Commissioning 5,000* Shipping 2,500***
Operations & Maintenance 3,000***    
Subtotal 213,500 Subtotal 66,500
Contingency 20,000*** Total 300,000

 

*Items intended to be funded by original CSF award

**Items intended to be funded by outside donation

***Items intended to be funded by this application

 

If we are not awarded the additional $50,000 requested in this application, we will

proceed with the $250,000 to construct a reduced array of approximately 80 kW.

 

PROJECT TIMELINE

The following is a potential project timeline:

CSF Full Proposal Due- TBD

CSF Award Notification- Late October, 2018 (TBD)

Request for Proposal Submitted- Early November 2018

Contractor Selected: Early 2019

Construction Begins: Late Spring 2019

Construction Completed: Summer 2019

 

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

 

Life Sciences Building Project Managers:

 

Project Lead - Alex Ratcliff, alexr529@uw.edu

 

Facility Manager - Jan Whittington, janwhit@uw.edu

Urban Infrastructure Lab Manager - Stefanie Young, sy10@uw.edu

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Alexander Ratcliff

Rebound: The Bounce Back Used Notebooks Deserve

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $405

Letter of Intent:

Project Proposal

Each quarter students buy brand new notebooks and throughout each lecture slowly fill the pages with diagrams and key points. However, as dead week rolls around many find they have excess blank pages leftover. A large portion of students hold on to these notebooks, never to look back at their notes, while others recycle or even put the paper into the trash. Our campus Rotaract Club is proposing an innovative alternative, to collect these notebooks at the end of each quarter to be disassembled and rebound into new notebooks. After disassembling all of notebook parts, papers of similar sizes will be grouped and then using aluminum screw posts and covers made of recycled materials, new notebooks will be formed. The recreated notebooks will be freely distributed at the start of the next quarter for their second lives in assisting student learning. To complete the “Rebound” project, our club will require upfront funding for a machining tools, customized stamps promoting sustainability, collection bins, and reusable promotion signs, along with funds to purchase pins and covers for each new notebook.

 

Environmental Impact

Throughout this collection and repurposing process all unusable materials will be disposed of properly. We will invite any unwanted notebooks to be put into our collection bins, in this way we are disposing of notebooks correctly, even if it does not contain immediately reusable paper. Not only does this give the unused paper the ability to be used, it also ensures that all components of notebooks, such as the metal spiral are correctly recycled. We hope to alleviate improper disposal that occurs each quarter, along with providing a second life to untouched paper. If large scale recycling is required we plan to partner with Seattle’s recycling resources, such as Seadrunar Recycling, a non-profit based in Seattle.

 

Student Leadership & Involvement

This process will take extensive planning within our club’s committee to ensure proper promotion and execution of notebook collection. Donation boxes are planned to be placed outside of main lecture halls, dorms, and dining halls on campus. Redistribution will be executed at the start of the quarter by tabling in Red Square. A committee will be formed within our club and will be mainly lead by select officers.

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

Each notebook will be customized with a stamp or sticker explaining the history of the notebook, along with promoting the importance of recycling used materials. The notebooks will also detail proper self-disposal at the end of it’s use. Our club plans to table in Red Square at the beginning of the quarter to spread awareness of the program, while distributing the rebound notebooks.  

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

The bulk of the manual labor required for this process will be completed by the members within the Rotaract Club. Each year we maintain approximately 25 active members and meet weekly to engage in service projects and to develop professionally. As our club is accustomed to service events we are highly equipped to take on a project of this magnitude. In this past year our members were a part of organizing and executing a hygiene kit packing event where over 800 kits were assembled for sex trafficked victims in the Seattle area. To maintain a long-term commitment to this plan, emphasis will be put on plan documentation and training of underclassmen. We also plan to conduct surveys when distributing notebooks to gain insight in how to better our program. Through these methods our “Rebound” project can be formed into a sustainable component of the University of Washington Seattle campus.

Project Budget

The proposed budget supplies enough materials to create 100 notebooks. The limiting factors will be the notebook covers and aluminum pins. Each new notebook will require 2 notebook covers, with 200 proposed in the budget. Three aluminum pins will also be required per notebook, with 300 planned in the budget.

Item Category Item Item Description and Distributor Qty Unit Price Shipping Cost Total Expense
Notebook Materials Notebook Cover 8.75” x 11.25” x 0.016” rounded corner grain composition notebook covers. In blue and green and 100% recyclable. Sold by Lamination Depot 200 $0.3011 $0* $60.22
  Aluminum Pins 5/8” aluminum screw pins. Sold by Lamination Depot 300 $0.0797 $0* $23.91
  Recycling Stamps Predesigned recycle stamps. Uses water-based inks and consist of post-consumer plastic for minimal environmental impact. Sold by simplystamps.com. 4 $8.95 $4.95 $40.75
  Custom Stamps Custom stamp detailing recycling instructions for notebook. Sold by thestampmaker.com. 1 $24.95 $5.90 $30.85
  Custom Sticker Custom circle sticker, 3” x 3” explaining the notebook origin. Sold by Vistaprint.com. 120 $0.537 $8.99 $73.47
Notebook Binding Tools Hole Punch 40 sheet 3-hole punch, with 9/32” diameter holes. Sold by Amazon “Bostitch EZ Squeeze 40 Sheet 3-Hole Punch (HP40)” 2 $19.84 $0 $39.68
Marketing Collection Bins Cardboard bins to collect used notebooks, 16” x 16” x 31”. Sold by Amazon “Disposable Cardboard Trash and Recycling Boxes: Bin + Lid + Trash Bag- White (Qty. 10 Sets)” 10 $9.00 $0 $90.00
  Vinyl Sign 3’ x 6’ custom vinyl sign, intended for tabling events in Red Square. Sold by buildasign.com. 1 $40.59 $0 $40.59
          Total Cost $402.51

*Shipping from Lamination Depot is free for orders over $75.00

 

Timeline

Task Name Start Date End Date
Fall Quarter 2018 9/26/2018 12/14/2018
Form "Rebound" Committee 10/2/2018 10/9/2018
Order collection supplies 11/1/2018 11/2/2018
Order rebinding supplies 11/8/2018 11/9/2018
Organize advertising plan 11/13/2018 11/27/2018
Notebook Collection 12/3/2018 12/14/2018
Rebinding of notebooks 12/12/2018 1/6/2019
Winter Quarter 2019 1/7/2019 3/22/2019
Redistribution of notebooks 1/7/2019 1/8/2019
Notebook Collection 3/11/2019 3/22/2019
Rebinding of notebooks 3/20/2019 3/31/2019
Spring Quarter 2019 4/1/2019 6/14/2019
Redistribution of notebooks 4/1/2019 4/2/2019
Notebook Collection 6/3/2019 6/14/2019
Rebinding of notebooks 6/12/2019 6/22/2019
Redistribution of notebooks 6/24/2019 6/25/2019
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Arielle Howell

HUB Bin Expansion Project

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $952

Letter of Intent:

14 May 2018 

 

 

My name is Izabella Dadula and I am a graduating senior in the University of Washington Industrial Design program on the Seattle campus. I am writing to apply for a small CSF grant ($952) for a student-led project (with faculty support).

 

Since Summer 2017, I have been working to redesign the physical containers that are part of the Smart Bins installation at the HUB. The Smart Bins installation (designed by Karen Cheng and Kristine Matthews, faculty members at the University of Washington) consists of a set of digital screens and videos that help educate users about proper recycling and composting. When someone throws trash into the bins, it triggers a weight sensor, and the screens tell the user how their choice impacts the environment. 

 

Unfortunately, the current bins are small surplus items provided by UW Recycling. They have very limited capacity (about 10 gallons). In the HUB location, these bins cannot handle the amount of foot traffic and waste at the HUB. By noon, the bins are completely overflowing with trash—and that deters people from seeing and using the installation (see photo next page).

 

To solve this problem, my design more than doubles the bins’ capacity. Throughout this year, I have consulted with the original research group and made multiple iterations of my design so that new bins accommodate both a larger liner and a larger digital scale. Besides increasing capacity, I have made the new bins with a side-door, which will also be easier (more ergonomic) for custodians to service. The current bins are top-loading, which means that custodians have to lift the waste bags up and out of the liners. 

 

I have been working with the UW School of Art Woodshop and 3D lab technicians, and we have secured free leftover wood from a salvage project that I can reuse for doors. The CSF grant will enable us to pay a fabricator to bend and powder-coat steel for the rest of the casing. We have sent the design out to local metal shops for quotes, and selected the lowest price. The new bins are extremely sturdy and should last more than 50 years. 

 

We have some funding from the UW HUB and UW HFS for this project. The artists/faculty are also willing to contribute/match these funds. With this CSF grant, we will have full funding and will be able to bring my design to life. This is an extremely exciting and important moment for me as a senior in industrial design—to finally see the production of a design that I personally worked on.

 

I believe this project addresses the CSF requirements because the installation has been proven to change behavior over time. In the bin’s previous location in UW’s PACCAR hall, trash sorts from the UW Garbology Project showed that the installation increases composting and reduces contamination in recycling. The installation is used not only by students and staff, but also by prospective students and families who visit the campus. The bins are currently located in a high traffic area and are a part of spreading proper waste management awareness in at the University of Washington and beyond.

 

Please help me see this project to its completion. Thank you very much for your consideration. 

 

Sincerely, 

Izabella Dadula

UW Industrial Design Senior

izdadula@uw.edu

 

BUDGET FOR EXPANDED CAPACITY HUB BINS
14 May 2018 

Wood Door Fabrication at School of Art + Art History + Design
Salvaged Wood Material $0

Woodworking Assistance from Flyn O’Brien, UW Design Technician $330

Hardware

Six Hinges from McMaster-Carr (Two per Door, $5.40 each) $32

Three Sets of Four Levellers from McMaster Carr ($7.05 per set) $28

WA State Sales Tax (10.4%) $6

Fabrication at Rainier
Metal Purchasing, Bending, Powder Coating and Assembly (Wood Door) $5,775

WA State Sales Tax (10.4%) $600

Interior Liners and Scales

Three Centurian 23 gallon bin liners ($21 each) $63

Three Adam Scales ($160 each) $480
WA State Sales Tax (10.4%) $56

Direct Printing for Bin Lids

Printing from Imagine Visual Services (includes WA State Sales Tax) $332

TOTAL COST $7,702

FUNDS RAISED

Budget from UW HUB $2,500

Budget from UW HFS $750

Matching Funds from UW Design Division $3,500

Requested funds from CSF Small Projects Grant $952

TIMELINE FOR EXPANDED CAPACITY HUB BINS
We can begin fabrication immediately after funds have been supplied by the CSF

Small Projects Grant. The fabrication process will occur during Summer Quarter 2018. 

The new bins can then be in place prior to the start of Fall Quarter 2018. 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Izabella Dadula

Salvage Wood Project Advertising Campaign

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

Dear Selection Committee,

I would like to thank you for funding all of the grounds management sustainability projects. The money you have supplied is helping the University become a more sustainable, environmentally friendly space.

One of our most successful projects, the salvage wood program, is in need of money for advertising. This project turns wood from fallen trees into usable products such as benches, tables and nametags. Keeping our trees on campus substantially reduces our carbon footprint. Grinding up and transporting these trees to cedar grove requires the use of fossil fuels and produces carbon emissions. Currently, there is more salvage wood than there is demand for its usable products. At the current rate we will not have adequate room to store all of the downed wood for future projects.

In order for this project to stay operational and efficiently use all of the wood from around campus, product orders need to be placed by the campus community. The money acquired from this grant will be used to increase our outreach by creating a workable website where campus organizations, faculty, staff and alumni can order different products created from salvaged wood. We will work with students from the marketing and business school to help us set up a website and advertising campaign throughout campus. Other forms of outreach will be established with the College of Built Environments who may have an interest in using the wood for their classes.

We will also create wooden tags and plaques using salvage wood to be placed in high visited areas throughout campus (The HUB, Suzzallo, Odeggard, Washington Commons, etc.). These tags/plaques will contain the following ‘To order salvage wood products (name tags, benches, tables etc.) please visit WWW.XXXXXX.com, This project is funded by the Campus Sustainability Fund.’  The majority of the funds will be used to pay for these tags which cost $65 each. Examples of these tags created by the salvage wood program can be seen below.

Thank you for your considerations for this grant. If awarded it will greatly help the salvage wood program.

Sincerely,

Michael Bradshaw

 

         

         

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Michael Bradshaw

WashPIRG 100% Renewable Energy Plant Potting Event

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $210

Letter of Intent:

CSF Small Project Application

Letter of Intent

 

Plant Potting & Pizza Night

UW WashPIRG

100% Renewable Energy Campaign

This project is meant to increase awareness of the 100% Renewable Energy Campaign through a fun event that will encourage students to engage in student activism. In this workshop, we will be providing small succulents, soil, and a pot that students can decorate. While students socialize and learn more about caring for their succulent, they will be creating something that they can share on social media or with their friends, increasing interest in renewable energy far beyond the night. The event will also include a workshop where we will talk about WashPIRG, the campaign, and the importance of renewable energy. In the workshop, leaders of the campaign will briefly talk about our goals and why renewable energy is important, and then ask prepared questions to open the topic for everyone to discuss. We may also show the “Buildings of the Future: Net Zero Energy” TEDxCSUSM video, to further educate students about why buildings with 100% renewable energy are the future.

Furthermore, studies have proven that having plants in the home can increase concentration and productivity, as well as reduce stress levels. Plants also reduce carbon dioxide and freshen up whatever space they are in. Having this event so close to finals week will be a great way to give back to the community while educating students about renewable energy, as well as providing students with a path towards making a difference and being more involved. This workshop is meant to start a dialogue about renewable energy on campus, as well as educate our peers about how we take action to create a more sustainable future.

1. Environmental Impact

The workshop will nurture a more sustainable campus by providing students with plants which help the environment and also create a path towards thinking about our impact on the planet in our daily lives. We are also being considerate to use compostable items where possible, as well as reuse any products we obtain, such as paint and soil. Educating our peers about renewable energy also begins a discussion about our own individual impact on the environment, as well as what we can do as students to urge others to make sustainable changes.

2. Student Leadership and Involvement

This project is entirely planned and executed by student volunteers, both within WashPIRG’s 100% Renewable Energy campaign as well as other students who express interest in volunteering. Participating in the project will provide students with event planning skills, as well as the skills needed to communicate environmentalism clearly, confidently, and respectfully to others.

3. Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

This project is aimed at encouraging students to become more aware of issues of sustainability and renewable energy in their daily lives. We hope that this interactive, environmentally friendly activity coupled with discussion as well as education about our cause will attract students who may not already be involved in environmental issues. After this event, we hope that these students will continue exploring sustainability through joining WashPIRG or another environmental RSO.

4. Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

All products needed have already been thoroughly researched for the most cost-effective and environmentally friendly options. Students across the campus community have expressed interest in the event and WashPIRG has the skills and resources to make it successful. While I do not think that time will be our enemy for this project, WashPIRG has put together successful events in a time crunch in the past. The Renewable Energy Rally held this year was planned in a short span and had over 60 attendees, it was also covered on two local news outlets as well as The Daily. For a full list of events organized by WashPIRG, refer here: http://uwashpirg.weebly.com/events.html. We have a dedicated team of students working on this project and have obtained permission to pull it off. Furthermore, the campaign has received guidance by Sean Schmidt, Sustainability Specialist at UW Sustainability, as well as WashPIRG’s full-time Campus Organizer, William Lehrer, whom our organization funds to support us.

Timeline

April 25

  • Second meeting with volunteers finalizing event plan and details
  • Research all supplies needed for the event
  • Begin reaching out to other students about the event

April 26

  • Reserve room in the HUB

April 27

  • Turn in CSF Application
  • Create Facebook page for event
  • Begin inviting students to event
  • Begin rough draft for conversation topics during workshop

May 1

  • Purchase supplies for event

May 2

  • Campaign Meeting
    • Sign up volunteers for event/workshop
    • Brainstorm and compile materials for workshop
    • Share facebook event
    • Sign up volunteers to make and post posters around campus

May 10

  • Campaign Meeting
    • Begin making and putting up posters around campus
    • Finalize conversation topics during workshop

May 18

  • “Plants and Pizza with WashPIRG 100% Sustainability Campaign” event in HUB 337 from 5:30-6:30 pm

Budget

  • Room booking
    • $12.50 + $22.00 for a custom set
    • $23.00 required cleaning fee for food
    • Total: $57.50
  • Materials for pots
    • Mini Terra Cotta Pots (4 dozen) - $30
    • Paint (10 pc.) - $25.00
    • Paint Palettes (2 dozen) - $10.00
    • Stickers (1 roll) - $3.00
    • Self-Adhesive Daisy Decorations (36 pieces) - $5.00
    • Total: $73.00
  • Plant Materials
    • Succulent Cuttings (40 pieces) - $60
    • Soil Mix - $10.00
    • Total: $70
  • Food (cannot be funded by CSF, funded through donations)
    • Pagliacci donation
  • GRAND TOTAL: $200.50 rounded up to $210
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Bernadette Bresee

TSA Night Market 2018

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

Project Summary
The UW Night Market has been expanded from HUB Lawn to Red Square since 2001. It is one of the Taiwanese Student Association’s signature events and the largest in scale in terms of people. The event recreates traditional night markets in Taiwan and is centered around food provided by vendors. This year, we will be expanding the vendor section to 30 vendors comparing to 20 vendors last year. Every year, this event creates large amounts of waste that isn’t properly disposed of by guests; this year, we plan to create a recycling plan that alleviates this issue by setting 2-3 volunteers at each trash station to monitor trash flow.
The plan is based on ZeeWee, a Zero Waste Event. The goal is to heavily reduce waste with a three-step process. First: replace all food containers with recyclable and compostable ones. Some containers are vendor specific and will require funds to replace in house. The second step is to eliminate bottled water and replace them with water stations and recyclable cups, which will also require funds. The third step is to assign waste reduction tasks to staff and volunteers. These tasks will include monitoring garbage disposal bins to ensure proper sorting, after event cleanup, etc. Most importantly, the plan will require a radical redesign that will ensure a greener Night Market but will severely strain our already tight budget.
Environmental Impact
With around 7,000 people per year visiting the UW Night Market and 30 vendors, a large amount of waste will be generated. By working closely with vendors and supervising trash containers, waste should be reduced by at least half and recycling increased by an even larger margin. This isn’t a plan that will be implemented once, UW Night Market 2018 will set a precedent for all following events created by TSA that involves food wastes.
Student Leadership and Involvement 
The UW Night Market is primarily run by the Taiwanese Student Association officers, a group of 45 dedicated students. Last year, we also had around 120 volunteers that participated at the Night Market. We are expecting around 100 volunteers this year, of about 30% of the volunteers and officers will be helping out with organizing the trash at each trash station. These volunteers come from various backgrounds; some are members of other UW RSO’s or are students at nearby high schools. Overall, student involvement is prominent. Every year TSA is excited to see so many people participating in the creation of Night Market. This year, we will also be encouraging our attendees to bring their own utensils through making short advertisement videos so that everyone can feel involved in partaking in being eco-friendly.
Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change
The hope is for event-goers and our officers to become more conscientious and aware of the consequences caused by the waste we generate. It is hoped that such a mentality will be adopted in the day-to-day lives of those involved in Night Market, and that the effects will extend beyond TSA events, but to the events of other on-campus organizations. This is why we will make short, eloquent advertising videos on encouraging people to bring their own cutleries. We hope that not only our attendees, but TSA members and students in general will be more aware of the trash generated in daily life.
Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability
TSA is a longstanding organization (founded in 1946) that has received multiple RSO rewards. Besides its reputation, TSA is credited with holding multiple large events annually, including a singing competition, semi-formal, and the aforementioned Night Market. A zero-waste event is a challenge that we are willing to take on and have confidence in fulfilling considering our vast experience in event planning. TSA is confident in its ability to use CSF monies in a responsible manner.
Budget
Seeing as night market serves 7,000 people, a conservative estimate for reusable water stations would be $500. Food containers would cost an additional $500. TSA requests $1000 to make this a reality.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Tiffany Lin

Secondary Contact First & Last Name: Jessica Ong

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Tiffany Lin

ReThink UW's Fourth Annual Resilience Summit

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $375

Letter of Intent:

ReThink has held an annual Resilience Summit for three years, and for those times, our organization was lucky enough to work with the CSF through partnerships and grants. This year the Summit focuses on regeneration: the development of systems that are capable of being restored and renewed through the integration of natural processes, human behavior, and community action. We hope to challenge the traditional definition of “sustainability” and discuss if this concept of a prolonged state of environmental impact is beneficial in the future. This year, the event will be held in Paccar Hall 392 to encourage maximum attendance from the Foster School of Business community, as well as other groups on campus interested in sustainable development. We are teaming up with several clubs from across campus to draw an eclectic crowd of around 30-50 students. These students will spend 2 hours listening to in-depth presentations from our business professionals, engaging in question and answer sessions, and ending with individualized plans of action that may simply consist of a changed mindset or even turn into future CSF proposals. With time for networking over a dinner of sustainable and local food, we hope our audience will come away with a diverse set of perspectives and go forth driving change in business-as-usual practices. Beyond the experience members of the planning committee will gain from organizing and marketing this event, all participants of the Resilience Summit will get exposure to a diverse array of students from other disciplines, and informative and inspiring presentations and discussions from professionals in their fields of work. It is a fantastic opportunity for students to broaden their perspectives from the more narrow views represented in their respective majors.

A large part of the challenge is bringing students together to find the root cause of UW’s environmental issues in order to create a feasible solution including a plan of action. The 30-50 students attending the event are expected to be engaged and thoughtful members of the audience. Action post-event is not required but will be highly encouraged and enabled by our team. We have invited speakers from Wells Fargo, The Nature Conservancy, Sustainable Business Consulting, and 3Degrees to speak about how their experiences, company, and/or mission approaches the concept of regeneration in terms of climate action. For example: “How did you get to your current position? Did you always know you wanted to work in sustainability?”, and “What does business environmental responsibility look like to you and your organization?” We are expecting to obtain funds from the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship and Wells Fargo to help us support this event as it directly affects many students within the Foster School of Business and across the greater UW campus community.

The monetary support of the CSF grant will enable us to perform the best possible outreach for the Resilience Summit in various relevant areas on campus in order to gain excitement and attendance that outweighs last year’s event.  Keeping our environment and UW’s paper reduction goals in mind, while still maximizing the potential for outreach to many attendees, we are planning to partially utilize ReThink grant money to create large poster boards and flyers that will illustrate the importance and quality of this event. ReThink has identified the most influential locations on campus that identify with the goals of this event and ReThink. These include, but are not limited to, the Foster School of Business, the Art and Design School, College of the Environment, Gould Hall, and the Paul G. Allen Center of Computer Science. The posters will be displayed in high-traffic areas, such as cafes and main entrances in order to attract the most attention. These posters complement our mainly digital marketing plan through our well known Facebook page, event page and targeted outreach of our board members and faculty contacts. Our multi-faceted marketing approach will maximize our outreach, and ensure that our environmental message will be heard loud and clear throughout campus.

The environmental problem that we hope to combat with this event is the same we’ve been working to oust for years previously: the widespread lack of education on pressing global environmental issues and sustainable development that UW students are broadly receiving. These issues apply to every student on campus in almost every academic discipline, yet not all students are required—or have room in their schedules—to take courses that touch on these issues, and independently sought information can often be misleading. Furthermore, though the University of Washington has undertaken many steps to be a sustainable campus, there is so much more that can be done, and we believe this starts with student education, involvement, and most importantly interest. The Resilience Summit thoroughly aligns with UW’s mission to sustainability. Even with such a broad term and definition, ReThink unites itself in all parts of all definitions in order to fully capture the meaning as it applies to business, industry, government, and individuals. We hope to be the catalyst to start developing a sustainable development certificate through the Foster School of Business that aligns conservation goals with quantifiable business skills. ReThink is widely known across campus for our work with the UW Sustainability Office, UW Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, and other environmental clubs around campus. We look forward to bringing this unique event to students from diverse educational backgrounds and hope to foster a learning environment where even our guest speakers can learn from others at this event.

 

 

II. Timeline

 

December 15- January 7 | Planning

  • Brainstorming
    • Partnerships
    • Funding Opportunities
  • Obtaining speaker confirmations
  • Creating marketing campaign
  • Reaching out to Foster Advancement for speaker introductions and potential funding

March 10-April 2 | Implementing

  • Implementing Marketing → Outreach
    • Online first
    • Then to print and around campus
    • Start outreach to organizations, email newsletters

April 3 - April 13 | Outreach

  • Sharing the Resilience Summit at other events, including the Global Leadership Summit
  • Sharing event opportunity in classes
  • Posting marketing poster boards in the Foster School of Business

April 13 - April 19 | Final Stage

  • Final marketing push
  • Extreme outreach
  • Finalization of details with all speakers and partners

 

III. Budget

 

ITEM COST PER QUANTITY TOTAL
Homegrown Catering Budget $350 1 $350
Speaker Parking Permits $20 5 $100
Photographer $100 1 $100
Marketing Poster Boards $25 4 $100
Materials for day-of break-out sessions $25 1 $25
       
  = TOTAL $675
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Serena Jonel Allendorfer

Engage with Renewable Energy: Interactive Art Exhibition & Reusables Workshop

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $674

Letter of Intent:

CSF Small Project Application

Letter of Intent

 

Engage with Renewable Energy: Interactive Art Exhibition & Reusables Workshop

UW WashPIRG

100% Renewable Energy Campaign

 

This project will include two components: a reusables workshop and interactive art exhibition to contribute to the Earth Day celebration on April 16-20th, 2018. The goal of both of these components is to engage UW students who may not already have a strong interest in the sustainability, climate change, or renewable energy and encourage them to incorporate these concepts into their daily lives.

The workshop will provide students with the opportunity to customize their own reusable item while talking with their peers about sustainability and renewable energy. We will provide students with blank tote bags, water bottles, thermoses, and cloth sandwich bags as well as an array of paint and stickers that they can use to create unique reusable items. We hope that these eye-catching designs will encourage their fellow students to start a dialogue about the reusable item and continue the conversation around sustainable choices. In addition, while the workshop is happening we will play a series of videos on the projector that focus on how we can engage with and incorporate sustainability and renewable energy into our worldview. One example of a video we could use is “Buildings of the Future: Net Zero Energy”, which was presented at TEDxCSUSM. Ideally, students will come away with a sparked interest in sustainability that will motivate them to take action in their own lives as well as a fun item that serves as a reminder of the event while reducing their environmental impact.

For the art exhibition, we will have a piece in a prominent position on the first floor of the Husky Union Building for the Monday to Friday of Earth week. The current concept for the piece is a giant “coloring page” that we will display in a four-foot long canvas on two large easels with an array of markers that students passing by can use to color in the piece. The piece itself will showcase a whimsical mural of interconnected vignettes depicting the often unnoticed connections between people and sustainability, such as wind turbines powering houses, urban gardens, and recycling facilities. We will work with the students creating the piece to make a design that appeals to them and tells this story of interconnectedness. One consideration we are keeping in mind is how to present a piece that will engage students and compel them to interact with it while expanding their view of sustainability and renewable energy. After we take down the piece, we are also looking into finding a space where we could permanently display it.

 

1. Environmental Impact

This project will nurture a more sustainable campus by providing around 100 free reusable items to students which will, over a lifetime of use, prevent many hundreds of disposable equivalents from entering landfills. We are also being considerate to use compostable items when possible and will reuse any supplies that we obtain, such as paint and markers.

2. Student Leadership & Involvement

This project will be entirely planned and executed by students, primarily being volunteers within WashPIRG’s 100% Renewable Energy campaign, as well as other students who express interest in contributing. Participating in this project will provide students with event planning skills, as well a unique opportunity to communicate scientific concepts through visual art.

3. Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

The entirety of this project is aimed at encouraging students to become more aware of and engage with issues of sustainability and renewable energy in their daily lives. We hope that these two components will attract students who aren’t already involved in environmental issues and encourage them to continue exploring after Earth week is over, such as by joining WashPIRG or other environmental RSOs.

4. Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

Although this project must be put together in a short amount of time, we are confident that we have the skill and resources to make it successful. WashPIRG has a history of putting together events under a time crunch, such as the Renewable Energy Rally we held last quarter which had over 50 attendees and was covered on two local news outlets as well as The Daily. For a full list of events our campaign has organized, refer here: http://uwashpirg.weebly.com/events.html . We have a dedicated team of students working on this project and have already obtained all of the permissions to pull it off. Furthermore, we have received guidance from Sean Schmidt, Sustainability Specialist at UW Sustainability, and are also supported by WashPIRG’s Campus Organizer, William Lehrer, who is a full-time staff who our organization pays to support us.

--

 

Timeline

April 5

  • Book room for workshop
  • Confirm art exhibition space in the HUB
  • Reach out to RSOs and students to collaborate on art exhibition (Sustainability In The Arts, Sustainability Action Network, Program on the Environment students)

April 6

  • Submit CSF application

April 9

  • Create poster promoting workshop

April 10

  • Planning meeting
    • Complete rough draft of art exhibition
  • Purchase workshop supplies (online, various websites)
  • Put up posters promoting workshop
  • Create Facebook page for workshop
  • Ask for events put up on the Sustainability Action Network’s Earth Day webpage and the UW Sustainability calendar
  • Send out email promoting the project to our coalition of RSOs
  • Send out email to our network of professors to promote the workshop

April 11

  • Campaign meeting
    • Sign up volunteers to oversee workshop
    • Recruit volunteers to help with exhibition
    • Brainstorm and compile video options
    • Share Facebook event

April 12

  • Purchase exhibition supplies (in person at Artist & Craftsman Supply)

April 13-15

  • Create art exhibition piece

April 16

  • Put up art exhibition in the HUB 1st floor street
  • Possible table promoting the workshop

April 17

  • Hold workshop, 4:30-7:30pm, in HUB 250

April 20

  • Take down art exhibition
  • If we have extra workshop supplies, give out during Earth Day table in Red Square 11:00am-5:00pm

 

Budget

Workshop:

  • Room booking
    • Custom set fee - $27
    • Room fee - $27
    • Cleaning fee - $28
  • Water bottles, thermos & canvas bags (25 of each) - $250
    • Reusable sandwich bags (27) - $115
    • Fabric paint - $20
    • Stickers - $35
  • Food - $30
    • Compostable plates & cutlery - $10

Exhibition:

  • Canvas, 36”x48” student grade - $70
    • Acrylic paint - $40
  • Markers - $22

TOTAL: $674

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Jiamei Shang

Row for Climate

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

To the CSF Committee,

What would it be like to row across an ocean? Meet Eliza Dawson, a UW undergraduate in Atmospheric Science and an avid adventurer (especially when it involves the water:)

In June 2018 she will row across the Pacific Ocean from California to Hawaii, a distance of 2,400 miles. She will row in a 24 ft long boat with 3 other crew mates from around the world, working with all their might to set a new world record for the fastest crossing, currently set at 50 days. Their boat will be completely human powered, no motor, no sail.

By doing this row, her goal is to bring attention to climate change. Earth is the only planet with a climate known to support life. Our unique planet is precious; meaning it should be of great value, not to be wasted or treated carelessly. Yet our protection is lacking. We need to do more and that is why she is crossing an ocean. She is an atmospheric science major with a focus on climate and am also an avid athlete. As a young climate scientist, she hopes to be a voice for science that makes climate change understandable and inspires societal action. Her blog has more information at row4climate.com.

She is currently working to raise a total of $20,000. As of April 3rd, she has raised $4,465. The $1000 from CSF would help to get a boat, get necessary technology and safety equipment, take courses to prepare for the trip, and buy gear and food.

Sincerely,

Alexander Urasaki

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Alexander Urasaki

UW Anaerobic Digester: Food Waste, Renewable Energy & Public Health (Phase 2)

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $35,000

Letter of Intent:

Summary: This is the Phase 2 (Full Proposal) of UW Anaerobic Digester project. The Phase 1 (Feasibility study) evaluated a) Site Location b) Gas usage c) Compost/Fertilizer usage d) Ongoing Maintenance requirements for building a 160-square foot anaerobic digester on the UW Seattle Campus. The Feasibility study is still underway, but is tentatively moving forward with the following: a) Site Location = UW Farm b) Gas usage = Power a small generator to provide electricity for appliances in the UW farm building (no electricity currently) c) Compost/Fertilizer = UW Farm/Grounds Management will share fertilizer output d) Ongoing maintenance = digester will be maintained by the UW Sustainability Coordinator (position within Grounds Management). The anaerobic digester would utilize food waste to produce renewable energy (biogas) and compost. The biogas and compost will be used for research projects by professors/students and by the UW Farm. The food waste would be provided by the UW Farm and UW Husky Union Building (HUB).

*Important change in the project proposal: We had originally planned to purchase an anaerobic digester from Impact Bioenergy (cost = ~$100,000), but we think a better alternative would be to form a lease agreement or lease-to-purchase agreement with Impact Bioenergy. Leasing is a good idea because: 1) There is no UW entity that is currently willing to “agree to take over the operational costs of this project” (CSF Project Approval Form). By leasing the digester, Impact Bioenergy will own/be liable for continued costs of the digester. 2) By leasing, we would be able to test having the digester on campus for 1-2 years, rather than permanently committing to having a digester on campus. The budget request in this proposal is to cover the leasing costs of the digester for 1-2 years. 

Environmental Impact: An anaerobic digester would have three main environmental impacts on the UW Seattle Campus: 1) Carbon Emissions: the anaerobic diges would utilize approximately 135lbs of food waste per day, so less food waste would be hauled from the UW campus to Cedar Grove Composting Facility. Reducing the amount of food waste that is hauled to Cedar Grove would reduce carbon emissions from garbage/waste disposal trucks that drive from UW to Cedar Grove. 2) Soil Health: an anaerobic digester would produce nutrient-rich compost that could be applied to the UW farm and Center for Urban Horticulture (and other locations on campus). 3) Renewable Energy: an anaerobic digester would be a small-scale model of how to generate renewable energy from food waste. The food waste is broken down by microbes, which produce methane gas, and the methane gas can be used to power a generator for electricity.

Student Leadership/Involvement: Student interest and leadership is primarily coming from a UW Registered Student Organization (RSO), called Global Sustainability Initiative (GSI). The undergraduate members include: Caelan Wisont, Zhaoyi Fang, Yushan Tong, and Kyler Jobe. GSI focuses on promoting sustainability on a global scale, emphasizing household-scale anaerobic digestion projects to create methane gas for stoves. There are also several UW MBA students involved in this project: John Turk (Class 2019), Robert Leutwyler (Calls 2019). These students are interested in examining the business model of the anaerobic digester, marketing of the fertilizer/compost produced, and scalability of small-scale anaerobic digester projects.

Education, Outreach & Behavior Change: Global Sustainability Initiative (GSI): GSI will conduct outreach to UW undergraduate students to build their membership and raise awareness about the anaerobic digester project. GSI will conduct outreach using tabling events, Facebook posts, and flyers. The UW Farm will also conduct outreach to students that are involved at the farm.

Feasibility, Accountability & Accessibility: This is the Full Proposal to move forward with building an anaerobic digester on the UW Seattle Campus. This project has a lot of support and is a collaboration between the Undergraduate/Graduate students, Professors, UW Facilities, UW Husky Union Building, UW Farm, UW Anaerobic Digester Project Leadership Team, UW Grounds Management, UW Landscape Architects/Design Review Board, and Impact Bioenergy. Impact Bioenergy (http://impactbioenergy.com/) is a business located in Seattle, WA that designs/builds anaerobic digesters to utilize food waste and produce renewable energy and compost.

 

Leadership Team:

Dr. Heidi Gough, PhD, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, hgough@uw.edu

Dr. Sally Brown, PhD, School of Forest Resources, slb@u.washington.edu

Aaron Flaster, BA, Research Coordinator, Department of Psychology, aflaster@uw.edu

Global Sustainability Initiative (Registered Student Organization), gsiuw@uw.edu

 

Budget Estimate: $35,000

 

Contact Information:

Aaron Flaster, B.A.

Research Coordinator, Department of Psychology, University of Washington

Work email: aflaster@uw.edu

Personal Email: aaronflaster@gmail.com

Cell #: 415-497-5877

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Aaron Flaster

SER-UW Native Plant Nursery - Future Growth

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $88,000

Letter of Intent:

Letter of Intent

Project Title: SER-UW Native Plant Nursery - Future Growth

 

Summary of Project Proposal:

Over the past two years, the SER-UW Native Plant Nursery has continued to provide a sustainable and immediate source of plant material, as well as the opportunity for students to gain valuable hands-on experience in horticulture. The Nursery has strengthened lasting relationships with UW and now supplies the majority of plant material used in ESRM courses. Collectively, we supplied over two thousand native plants to these courses in 2018 alone. The Nursery continues to provide resources for graduate student projects, many opportunities for volunteers, and valuable internship opportunities for undergraduate students throughout the year. All plants grown on campus are subsequently used in campus projects, reducing reliance on outside sources and contributing to the UW Sustainability Mission.
 

While working with community partners and UW organizations to secure long-term support, the Nursery seeks gap funding to continue our mission of horticultural education and the production of quality plant material for student projects. We seek funding for two Research Associate (RA) positions which would contribute jointly to improving nursery production tasks, the education program, and outreach. These positions would continue to enhance our programs while facilitating the transition of the Nursery to a permanently funded entity on campus.
 

In order to keep up with student interest, we wish to provide more internship opportunities and projects as components of these internships. The RA positions would direct the creation of a program where native seed could be sustainably harvested from the wild and grown on-site for use in restoration projects. A seed harvesting project will provide interns with an abundance of opportunities to learn new skills, such as field techniques and navigation, data collection, plant identification, and seed harvesting. There is also the possibility to form partnerships with local organizations with similar missions and foster a greater investment in the ecological restoration community of the region.
 

The RA positions would also be responsible for the design and implementation of a fern propagation and rhizome bed production program to fill critical gaps in plant sourcing needed for student restoration projects in Yesler Swamp and Union Bay Natural Area, as well as across campus. This would also provide interns and volunteers opportunities to learn a variety of different production methods and greatly reduce the need for outside sourcing of plant material, increasing the long-term sustainability of the Nursery.

 

Student Leadership and Involvement:

The SER-UW Nursery continues to be an entirely student-run organization, providing valuable experience for graduate students in project management and leadership, as well as many opportunities for interns and other undergraduate and graduate student volunteers. We have strengthened our relationship with the Carlson Center, a leadership and community service organization on campus, with 24 service learning volunteers providing 20 hours each per quarter since 2016. We continue to host weekly volunteer work parties throughout each quarter to provide experiential learning credit for students in ESRM classes and other programs. Since 2016, the Nursery has involved roughly 885 student volunteers, culminating in over 3,000 volunteer hours contributed by students across many majors and departments. Developing programs for seed collection, fern propagation, and rhizome beds will greatly increase the number of unique opportunities available for student volunteers and interns beyond the scope of our current offerings and allow us to keep up with student interest.

 

Education, Outreach, and Behavior Change:

The SER-UW Nursery continues to involve volunteers in every aspect of our work, conducting weekly work parties open to students. The Nursery also provides an ideal outdoor laboratory for ESRM 412, a course focused on native plant production and nursery management. Having these facilities on-campus limits the need for outside materials and spaces for UW-based coursework. Since 2016 the Nursery has hosted five public plant sales to provide an opportunity for members of the greater community to purchase sustainable, student-grown plant material. Sales and attendance of these plant sales have increased since the start of the program, expanding our community involvement and connections. Funds from the plant sale are reinvested directly into the Nursery to fund seed sources, volunteer opportunities, and necessary planting materials.
 

For the seed collection program to maximize its potential, it will require the involvement of a network of participants beyond the Nursery. This program will help to foster relationships with other native plant nurseries and related community organizations. Construction of fern propagation and rhizome beds will also allow us to exchange knowledge and collaborate with partner organizations.

 

Environmental Impact:

The SER-UW Nursery has facilitated the installation of planting projects throughout campus by providing high quality, local and affordable plant materials. Growing plants in-house has reduced the carbon emissions and other costs associated with plant acquisition. During our time of growth, we have been conscious of our footprint and are committed to remaining environmentally sustainable. In Winter quarter of 2018, a Community and Environmental Planning major and nursery intern conducted an abbreviated sustainability life cycle assessment for the Nursery to evaluate its successes and areas for improvement in terms of environmental impact. Fertilizer and pesticide use, recycling, and other practices were assessed in order to set goals for continuing to lessen our environmental impact as we continue to grow.

 

Looking forward, the development of a monitoring and seed collection program will help to close the loop between nursery production and restoration at UW. A seed collection program will enhance the overall sustainability of nursery operations by reducing reliance on outside seed sources and provide material that is more genetically appropriate for our region. The fern propagation and rhizome beds will also drastically reduce the need for off-site sourcing of necessary species, further cutting down on carbon emissions related to travel and shipping of plant materials.

 

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability:

The SER-UW Nursery is dedicated to contributing the UW goals of sustainability and environmental accountability. Projects will continue to be overseen by two part-time managers and a faculty advisor. The Production Manager will secure plant contracts and will be primarily responsible for the day-to-day growing of materials, as well as initiating the installation of a fern propagation and rhizome bed systems. The Education and Outreach Manager will be primarily responsible for managing volunteers and will be the point person for interns. In addition, both managers will work together to write curriculum and protocols, as well as establish relationships to create a seed collection program.
 

Over the past year, the Nursery has made considerable strides in its ongoing push to become a permanent and self-sustaining entity at the University of Washington. Our partnership with the UW Botanic Gardens has opened up further opportunities for student leadership and education within the field of ecological restoration, as well as provided for the growing need for native plant materials on campus and within the Greater Seattle region. There is a strong desire within UWBG to continue to build upon this partnership by funding the Nursery in the long term. A grant award from the CSF will allow the Nursery to continue to contribute to UW’s Sustainability Mission while discussions of funding are finalized over the course of the next academic year.

 

 

Primary Contact:
Sarah Shank

sashank7@uw.edu

 

Secondary Contact:

Kyra Matin

kmatin1@uw.edu

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Sarah Shank

Bringing green games to the UW campus

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $16,028

Letter of Intent:

Project Summary

Over the past year, a team consisting of a researcher and multiple students within the College of the Environment conducted a feasibility study to evaluate the potential of using games to promote more sustainable actions on campus (i.e., “green games”). The feasibility study consisted of a review of existing games, holding a game jam, and a survey to assess receptiveness and preferences of the UW community around green gaming. The feasibility study resulted in many positive outcomes, including development of multiple sustainability game prototypes, creating connections in the sustainability and gaming communities (both within and outside of UW), and measuring interest and preferences related to different types of green games across the UW community.

The feasibility study identified opportunities as well as challenges related to implementing green games on campus. The opportunities include substantial interest in environmentally-themed games across diverse demographics (age, area of study, student/staff/faculty status) at UW, the potential to create games with powerful messages using moderate resources, and potential to partner with industry, non-profits, and other universities that are interested in using games to promote sustainability.

Leveraging these opportunities, however, will require overcoming several challenges also identified in the feasibility study. The first of these is healthy skepticism, particularly of digital games, which may be seen as antithetical to environmental or sustainability issues due to interfering with time in nature, being overly monetized, or even addictive. A second – and greater – challenge for implementing games to promote sustainability is competing in the “attention economy”, which includes a large marketplace of games for the purpose of making money. Environmental games geared toward raising awareness and promoting behavior changes have to compete with a well-financed industry vying for players. Finally, there are still important unknowns with respect to using games to promote sustainability, namely demonstrating links between gameplay and willingness of players to actually modify future behavior.

The feasibility study also evaluated a range of incentives that made students, staff, and faculty more likely to engage with green games; somewhat surprisingly, competition and personal rewards were ranked as only moderately important. In contrast, realizing an environmental benefit and cooperation with other people were ranked as some of the most interesting potential game features. This and other information gained from the feasibility study places us in an excellent position to develop games that are more likely to appeal to a broad cross-section of the UW community and have effectively raise awareness or create changes in behavior over time.

As a result of conducting the feasibility study, this team is ready to implement a project that 1) creates and tests games related to multiple environmental issues, 2) tracks individual feedback and responses to link gameplay with changes in awareness and behavior, and 3) shares knowledge and establishes partnerships with other universities and colleges to help develop or use green games on their campuses.

Methods and Outcomes

Engagement with the UW community will be primarily through the creation of four short, topical games that address environmental issues where students can have a positive impact through individual behavior change (e.g., water use, energy use, plastic reduction). These four games will be developed specifically for use on gaming stations that will be temporarily deployed (i.e., for 2-3 weeks at a time) in 4-6 high traffic areas on campus where the UW community can access them. Creating the kiosks as mobile stations will allow us to move them to different parts of the campus, maximizing accessibility and exposure. The UW community will be able to access the kiosks spontaneously and on their own; however, we will also conduct focused email, flyer, and social media campaigns on campus during the period that the kiosks are up with an incentive offered (e.g., having name put in a drawing for a gift card) to those who participate by playing through and giving feedback on at least one of the games.

One of the project goals is to assess the impact of different games on environmental awareness and potential to motivate behavior change over time, so the kiosk and games will be arranged to provide feedback and track responses. A player will be presented with a choice of the four games on different topics and choose one to start; this will result in information on whether certain topics are more attractive than others to players. After playing through the game, players will be asked to give some rapid feedback on how engaging the game was and how much their knowledge of the topic improved (i.e., Did awareness increase?). At this point, players will be given a short list of potential actions that they can elect to take around this issue; the choices will range from simple to more involved, such as a simple pledge to reduce consumption/use vs. opting to have additional information and actions emailed to them (i.e., Can games impact motivation and behavior?). The player can then elect to play through another short game or end the session and be entered into a drawing. Players will be required to give a UW email address for entry into the drawing, creating the potential to re-survey players at a later date.

Although we are designing this project to gain information that can guide development of future games, players will have little experience of being a “research subject”. The feedback sections will be designed to be short, engaging, and positive, and as a natural follow-on to the environmental games. One of the results of the feasibility study was that people are very interested in contributing to research via gaming approaches, so we anticipate that opportunities to give feedback will actually encourage more people to participate and play the kiosk games than otherwise.

Following the active period during which we are pushing traffic to kiosks, the gaming kiosks will be available as a temporary, interactive sustainability exhibit at locations around the UW campus (e.g., The Burke Museum) and/or during special events (e.g., UW’s Sustainability Festival). We are currently and would continue to reach out to partners on campus that could make use of this type of exhibit.

Outreach and Partnerships

Based on contacts, interest, and feedback from the game jam and gaming survey from other universities and non-profit partners, we believe that there is widespread interest in this topic, and strong potential to partner with other universities to create campus-focused games that promote and encourage sustainability. For this reason, one of our major goals for this project is to produce results, information, and products that can help guide efforts or even be directly used at other campuses. We have therefore developed a focused plan to reach out and establish these partnerships:

  1. We are currently working to publish the results of the literature/gaming review, game jam, and survey as a short peer-reviewed (target journal: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education) or popular magazine article (e.g., UW Columns). Publishing these results will be an important step in establishing credibility and communicating the potential for green games for other universities and colleges across Washington State.
  2. We will use our results to reach out to campus sustainability units and faculty at Washington State colleges and universities, and invite partnerships to work together to implement gaming projects in other locations. Some of the opportunities for partnership include conducting a game jam elsewhere, replicating the green gaming survey, and/or temporarily installing the gaming kiosks at another university campus.
  3. We are currently working with multiple research groups on campus and non-profit agencies interested in using games to promote conservation (e.g., UW’s Freshwater Initiative, Cascade Water Alliance, The Nature Conservancy). These partners are willing to consult on design and development of topical environmental games for the kiosks, with the goal of repurposing some of the games afterwards to help advance their own conservation efforts. 

The Team

The project will be led by an enthusiastic and highly capable team. Lauren Kuehne is a Research Scientist at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, working on diverse issues of ecology, conservation, and innovative science communication. She led the recent year-long feasibility study to evaluate use of games to promote sustainability, a project that has delivered on all project outcomes while using only half of the total project budget. Cailin Winston is a sophomore at the UW that is majoring in biochemistry and currently considering a double major in computer science. She has a passion for tackling environmental issues and loves to come up with creative solutions to problems. Caleb Winston is currently a high school senior that will enter the UW in fall of 2018 with the intention of majoring in Computer Science. He has already developed and published a number of apps and games for the web, iOS, Android, and Amazon Echo/Alexa, including a recycling app (Sorted, available on multiple app stores). He has participated in multiple game jams including the world's largest, the Ludum Dare competition, where his entry was among the top 100 highest rated games internationally. Cailin and Caleb together participated as a team in the recent UW Sustainability Game Jam and created a game about electronic waste (Salvage), which won first place.

How this project meets the requirements and preferences of the Campus Sustainability Fund

  1. Environmental Impact

Environmental impact comes down not only to the actions that individuals make in any given day or time, but their willingness and commitment to practice sustainable behaviors over time, advocate for sustainability in their community or government, or even apply their professional skills and ingenuity to sustainability problems. As such, we believe that - by allowing people to connect with environmental issues in positive, creative ways – games can help people overcome despair that stands in the way of action. This project is about testing how games can create a diverse access to more sustainable actions and behaviors by a community to ultimately reduce impact in areas such as energy and water conservation, waste reduction, and pollution.

  1. Student Leadership & Involvement

The project is co-designed and led by two undergraduate students who have already demonstrated extensive leadership and skills in addressing environmental sustainability through the innovative use of apps and games. Although both undergraduate leads are already highly accomplished in designing games and applying research-based approaches to sustainability efforts, this project will offer added, professional opportunities to develop their management, development, and leadership skills by producing highly tangible and published outcomes (e.g., games, articles/publications). In addition, we will continue to partner with student groups on campus that can contribute to project goals and outcomes. RSOs and student groups with whom we have worked during the feasibility study include UW GameDev Club, Husky Gamer Nation, UW Earth Club, UW SEED, Green Greeks, EcoReps, UW Bothell Sustainability Club, and the Sustainability Action Network. Students in these groups have contributed by volunteering, allowing us to present at club events or classes, participating in the game jam as developers and volunteers, and helping promote events and surveys.

We will also pursue opportunities to involve students in game development (e.g., students in the Earthgames class, Game Dev Club), beta-testing (Game Dev Club, HCDE Peeps), or in the gaming-impact evaluation stage (e.g., Information School or Program of the Environment capstone programs). One student group that has already committed to this project is UW’s Freshwater Initiative, a graduate student collective that spearheads research and outreach related to freshwater conservation; Freshwater Initiative is very interested in assisting in developing and promoting a game related to water quality and conservation.

In short, as with the feasibility study, the project is designed to create meaningful opportunities for students to contribute, lead, and develop their own ideas and initiatives related to green games.

  1. Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

The main focus of the project is to develop games related to environmental topics where individual behavior changes can have a big impact. The games will be distributed on campus using mobile kiosks that maximize exposure; the games will not only serve to educate players but will also help us collect information about how games can link to changes in awareness, motivation, and behavior. Following the active kiosk period on campus, the kiosks and four games can be repurposed for use as temporary sustainability exhibits as well as use by non-profit partners in their conservation efforts. Results and products will be produced in ways that are readily shared with other colleges and universities for use in their campus community to promote sustainability.

  1. Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

Collectively, the team has all of the skills and expertise needed to effectively implement this project. Lauren Kuehne is a Research Scientist and a highly accomplished project manager with a strong history of collaborating with diverse academic and non-profit partners. As such, Ms. Kuehne would manage project outcomes and provide logistical support (e.g., apply for in-kind donations, permits), design response-impact surveys for games, and ensure all quality and research standards (e.g., human subjects research review) are met. Ms. Kuehne would also be in charge of reaching out to other colleges and universities, reporting/publications, and working with academic and non-profit partners. Cailin Winston is a biochemistry major with strong public communication skills, as well as creative talents in game design. Cailin will assist with project management, communication, and game design. Caleb Winston is an incoming UW student (CS major) with highly advanced skills in programming apps and games for both web and mobile platforms. Caleb will lead the creative and technical process of game development.

Project Timeline: July 2018 – July 2019

Budget: Our final requested budget will depend on some factors that can’t be confirmed yet. One of these would be a decision of the Campus Sustainability Fund to allow us to rollover approximately $2,900 remaining in our budget from the feasibility study. If CSF allows us to use these remaining funds, the total additional requested for this project would be $16,028. However, this amount includes $3,000 in computer and technology costs (large tablet computers, a game development computer, cloud storage) that may be available through alternative avenues such as the Student Technology Fund, UW IT’s Cloud Computing Research Credits, and the Student Technology Loan Program. We are working to confirm the feasibility of using these alternative resources. The requested budget range is therefore $13,028 - $18,928.

Primary Contact: Lauren Kuehne, lkuehne@uw.edu

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Lauren Kuehne

Go Team, Go Green!

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $40,000

Letter of Intent:

PROJECT SUMMARY

The Go Team: Go Green! project uses a friendly competitive spirit and school pride as motivating factors to engage in campus sustainability. A fundamental aspect of student life at UW –as well as at universities around the country and worldwide– is intercollegiate athletics. Major UW sports events such as men's football and women's basketball are extremely popular among students on campus, and also provide an important means for alumni and other community members to stay connected and involved with the UW flagship campus in Seattle. Here we propose to use this powerful community and campus social phenomenon of intercollegiate athletics as a motivating factor for sustainability. We will work with student groups at UW to organize intercollegiate sustainability challenges to occur during the school year in the week leading up to specific intercollegiate athletics matches. For example, in the week before UW-University of Oregon football match, student groups from the Seattle and Eugene campuses will have a friendly competition for the most sustainable student group and overall campus; another such competition would occur in the week leading up to the UW-Stanford women's basketball match. Judges will be made up of student groups from participating schools not competing that week.

To support these competitions, we will:

I. create a dedicated website on the UW server that will house

  • a modified version of the Primary Contact's student carbon footprint calculator (now at http://footprint.stanford.edu, moving to the UW sever this year);
  • a conversation forum that will act as a blog of sorts, and a means of communication for participating students and campus community members at large;
  • a "search timeline" drawn from Twitter and Instagram hashtags, e.g., #GoTeamGoGreen.

II. work with UW student environmental groups and students in the Program on the Environment to identify UW student leaders willing to contact their colleagues at select universities across the country over Summer 2018.

  • The goal will be to have a handful of schools scheduled for the pilot challenges in Fall 2018 (F18) and Winter 2019 (W19).

III. Support these pilot challenges in F18 and W19 via:

  • posting of a "line-up" early in the week comparing carbon footprints and other campus sustainability efforts planned and undertaken by the respective students/student groups from the two competing schools;
  • encourage use of our conversation forum to post updates in the week leading up to the sports match, in particular focused on new initiatives envisioned and undertaken by the student groups;
  • promote the challenges on our web site, on social media and thru campus and city-wide publications;
  • voting on the "winning" school by a (non UW) school involved in a different challenge week that year.

At the end of the Fall and Winter seasons, the UW students involved in the project will choose a winning (non-UW) competitor, which will receive a plaque in the mail to hang in their dormitory, club office, etc., as appropriate. To be considered for the award, 10 students from that school must submit anonymous evaluations of the project so that we can make changes that will improve the project in an attempt to ensure its long-term sustainability and portability to other schools worldwide.  All school groups that qualify for award consideration will recieve certificates of participation that they can distribute to the individual students.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND PREFERENCES OF CSF

1. Environmental Impact. We expect the project not only to lead directly to meaningful sustainability efforts both on UW and the partner campuses, but also to inspire the broader student communities to examine their own impacts and make lifestyle changes for sustainability.

2. Student Leadership & Involvement. Although we have yet to identify specific student leaders and groups for the project, this is a key and integral goal. By the time of the Full Application (should the committee invite one from us), we commit to identifying students to act as leaders, particularly those who would commit to undertaking the contacts with the partner schools during Summer 2018 to find "opposing teams." Secondary Contact Kristi Straus is already in communication with her students in the Program on the Environment to try to tap students to step forward next month and assist with the full application, and with efforts in the summer should the project be funded. Furthermore, in April, we plan to contact faculty in the Computer Science department to see if any classes from Spring '19 would like to engage in the modifications to our website and associated tools (in response to the post-project evaluations from participating students at UW and elsewhere - see above) as student-led computer programming class projects.

3. Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change. The aforementioned plans to use social media and "piggy-back" on the popularity of the sports events is a ready-made vehicle for education and outreach. The goal is not only to use a competitive spirit to produce behavioral change, but to reach and inspire the broader campus and surrounding communities in both locations during and following each competition week.

4. Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability. We will be able to track our progress using the proposed newly-designed and modified web based tools. The long term and more ambitious goal will be to sufficiently engage the campus communities (and specifically the athletic programs) that future support, promotion and funding for competitions will come from the athletics programs themselves in coordination with campus student groups.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Jason Hodin

Ethnoforestry: Bringing a new method of sustainable forestry to campus

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $110,000

Letter of Intent:

Summary of Project

The University of Washington’s Olympic Natural Resources Center (ONRC) is pioneering the new scientific discipline of ethnoforestry that elicits traditional ecological knowledge by local people and incorporates it into the forest management process. Indigenous communities have thousands of years of knowledge on the inner workings of ecosystems and this information can be utilized to make more mindful and inclusive decisions that benefit both ecosystems and local communities. Each tribe has cultural keystone species that are of the utmost importance to their culture. Through ethnoforestry, we will learn how to grow and install these plants back onto the landscape so community members have more access to these species for food, medicine, and more. Ethnoforestry is a new and exciting approach to current land management and will be brought to main campus through this project where students will work on tangible projects that will directly impact rural Washington communities, enhancing sustainability and knowledge across campus and Washington state.

 

The first part of this project will take place on campus through the 2018-2019 academic year.  

During this time, grant funds will be allocated to fund a research assistant position that will spearhead ethnoforestry projects on campus. Projects will cover the following main topics: UW community engagement, plant propagation and production, and strengthening tribal relationships in partnership with the UW Native Pathways Program.

UW community engagement will include creating a new interdisciplinary class, providing internship opportunities for undergraduate students, and offering volunteer work parties for any student interested in ethnoforestry. At the University of Washington, students who are interested in horticulture, plant production, or ethnobotany on campus have very few opportunities to engage and learn about these topics. None of these options, from classes to field courses to symposiums, offer a hands-on opportunity for students to learn how traditional ecological knowledge can be used to improve applied forestry. We will develop an ethnoforestry course in partnership with the Society for Ecological Restoration-UW (SER-UW) Nursery where students can learn applied ethnoforestry in an interdisciplinary way, bringing together students from a wide range of majors and interests from the College of Built Environment to Anthropology and beyond. In addition, ONRC will host one to two ethnoforestry interns quarterly, providing a more in-depth experience for those interested in the topic. Finally, we will offer volunteer work parties in collaboration with the SER-UW Nursery. For students wanting to take this information into their future careers, this will provide opportunities for them to get hands-on experience.

The research assistant, interns, and volunteers will work on plant propagation and production projects. This will include identifying cultural keystone species important with local coastal tribes and learning best growth practices. In collaboration with the SER-UW Nursery, we will install raised beds at the Center for Urban Horticulture that will be used to grow these species in high volumes. These plants will be used for UW forestry studies as well as on-campus student restoration projects. All components of this will be designed and implemented by UW students, providing a space to learn new and sustainable plant propagation and production methods not currently being done by the SER-UW Nursery.

Finally, we will also focus on strengthening Olympic Peninsula coastal tribal relationships. ONRC has been building relationships with coastal tribes on the Olympic Peninsula for two decades. Through these relationships, it has become clear that many of theses communities are impacted by persistent poverty and a lack of opportunity to pursue higher education. Tribes have indicated that they would like to learn plant propagation techniques to teach their youth important knowledge on cultural use of plants. Once grown, these plants can be installed on reservations where tribal members can harvest and utilize these species for a myriad of uses from basket making to medicine. Part of this project will be to create a sister nursery on the Quileute Indian Reservation. UW students will be able to utilize the ethnoforestry knowledge they learned throughout the year on campus and apply it to teach tribal youth how to propagate and grow these culturally important species. A small hoop house will be constructed to house these plants. Tribal youth will be able to hear from UW students about their pathways to college and their involvement in this project. Interested tribal youth will be able to visit campus to learn how they could become future students, increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion on campus.

The second part of this project will happen over summer quarter of 2019. Three to five undergraduate interns will work on applied ethnoforestry on the Olympic Peninsula. These students will be based out of ONRC in Forks, WA. They will be able to see ethnoforestry in action on a new forestry study on the western side of the Olympic Peninsula. These UW students will work with tribal youth to set up an ethnobotanical garden with cultural keystone species at ONRC and work on constructing the new nursery on the Quileute Indian Reservation in concert with their social services Youth Opportunity Program.

Environmental Impact

This project has far reaching environmental impact across campus. First, engaging students from all majors and backgrounds through our volunteer program will help disseminate knowledge on how we can responsibly manage green spaces that incorporates important traditional ecological knowledge and wisdom to benefit both communities and ecosystems together. This new and inclusive approach will create a positive environmental impact from student restoration projects to UW grounds projects. In addition, we will be working in close partnership with the SER-UW Nursery to establish new raised beds to more effectively grow additional plants that can be used for on campus projects. These new raised beds will be designed to use less space, water, and soil, reducing the resources required and enhancing sustainability. This will follow the same philosophy as the SER-UW Nursery’s current mission where plants are grown on campus for campus projects, closing the loop and creating a more sustainable system.

Student Leadership and Involvement

All components of this project will have student leadership and involvement. The research assistant position will be filled by a UW graduate student, providing important leadership to this project. A key aim of this project is to make opportunities available for students to learn about ethnoforestry in a hands-on and tangible way on campus. Volunteer opportunities will be available for all students while quarter long internship opportunities will also be provided for those interested in a more in-depth experience.

Education, Outreach, and Behavior Change

There will be a strong emphasis of education, outreach, and behavior change through this project targeting coastal tribal youth through a guided pathways approach.  Creating an interdisciplinary ethnoforestry course on campus open to all students would greatly increase educational opportunities. In addition, creating consistent internships and volunteer opportunities will teach students how they can help change behavior in the long term by their hands-on connection. We will partner with SER-UW, a club that consistently engages large numbers of interested students, to provide outreach to the UW community.

Feasibility, Accountability, and Sustainability

This ethnoforestry project is very feasible. The framework and beginning stages have already begun for this project including creating partnerships with coastal tribes and with the SER-UW Nursery, generating plant propagation curriculum for a sister nursery, and determining some cultural keystone species. This grant would provide the key funding we need to continue to push this project forward. We strongly believe that providing a space where students can learn about this new discipline of ethnoforestry will create and enhance sustainability on campus, but will also have a ripple effect as students move on into their future endeavors and take this knowledge and new skill set with them.

Project Budget

We are requesting $110,00 for this project. This amount would include funding for one research assistant position for the 2018-19 academic year, supplies for plant propagation and production needs, construction of a sister nursery, transportation to and from ONRC, and lodging for the RA position and interns throughout the summer.

Contact Information

Courtney Bobsin

cbobsin@uw.edu

 

Bernard Bormann

bormann@uw.edu

 

Frank Hanson

fsh2@uw.edu

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Courtney Bobsin

A Feast for the Senses: A Community Pop-Up Cafe

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

To facilitate the execution of my senior capstone project for my major Community, Environment, and Planning, I am requesting a grant of $1000 to fund my project expenses. I am creating an interactive, experiential learning style food symposium, where I will create a juxtaposed “Feast for the Senses” to educate UW students about food choices and their connections to sustainability in social and environmental spheres. This project is primarily an educational and behavioral change endeavor that seeks to address the concept of the local as global (and vice versa), empowering individuals (students) with knowledge to make informed consumer choices through experiential learning. This exhibit will juxtapose the ideas of “farm to table” versus “firm to table,” with practical applications for education of industrial and biodynamic practices and products through different tasting menus. Each menu will focus on a different sense: taste, touch, smell, sound, and sight. Here, I wish to influence perception of reality through the senses, using them as tools of self-knowledge and personal development to broaden consciousness and establish a heightened present awareness. This knowledge will enable and empower students to make choices, starting with food consumption and preparation, that honor virtuous consumption with lower resource impacts. Additionally, I hope to have active community participation and engagement through public art forums throughout the exhibit, providing a basis for co-creation and collaboration. Expenses will cover supplies for constructing the space, in dollars $: Cost of space (tables, tents, wood for archway to space): $250 Speakers: $40 Art supplies for murals: $130 Food for tasting menu: $300 Plates, utensils, etc: $50 Costs of printing materials: $100 Balloons: $30 Lights for space: $100 Total cost: $1000 Timeline: Date of event May 4th

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kathryn Kavanagh

Northwest Center for Livable Communities

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $45,000

Letter of Intent:

Northwest Center for Livable Communities

Gould Hall 448F

3950 University Way NE

Seattle, WA 98105

Brittt4@uw.edu

 

March 9, 2018

 

Campus Sustainability Fund

University of Washington Seattle Campus

Seattle, WA 98195

 

RE: Grant Proposal.

 

Dear Campus Sustainability Fund:

 

The Northwest Center for Livable Communities is providing you with this Letter of Intent (LOI) regarding a grant proposal for funding our organization in the current academic year  2017- 2018.  We hope that this effort will be the beginning of a long and productive relationship between the Northwest Center for Livable Communities (NWCLC) and the Campus Sustainability Fund (CSF) here at the University of Washington.    

 

      As we discussed in our recent meeting on February 14, 2018, we are seeking funding to expand the NWCLC’s role at the UW.  During the past  36 years the NWCLC has sought to create a viable platform to connect the UW community with current leaders in the built environment.  The proposed NWCLC speakers’ bureau will highlight local, regional, national and international best practices in sustainable design, construction materials and methods, urban mobility, land use and place making. Currently, the NWCLC is unable to underwrite the cost of a speakers’ bureau which we believe will become financially self-sustaining in the near term. We will be requesting funding from the CSF to launch this exciting new program.

 

     In addition, with funding in hand, the NWCLC will underwrite an annual student led project to be implemented on the UW Seattle campus.  This project will be designed and built by students for students. We anticipate the first project to be designed and built on campus in Fall 2018.  

 

 
       
         
         
Organization NWCLC      
3/29/2017        
Funding Request #1      
Cost Item Monthly Cost One-Time Cost Total Cost
Speaking Program Startup Cost        
Space Costs                       4                       $1,500                          $4,700
Event Staff                       4                              $750                        $3,000                        $3,000
Speaker #1                            $3,000                        $3,000
Speaker  #2                            $3,000                        $3,000
Speaker  #3                            $6,000                        $6,000
Speaker #4                            $6,000                        $6,000
Travel For speakers                       4                          $1,500                        $6,000                        $6,000
Stay for Speakers                       4                              $500                        $2,000                        $2,000
Speaking Equipment Rental                       4                              $200                           $800                           $800
Food and Beverage                        4                     $500                        $2,000                        $2,000
           
         
           
Miscellaneous                         $1,000                        $1,000
Total  Costs                           $37,500
         
NWCLC & CSF Studio Study        
Studio Development                        $4,000.00
Studio Equipment                                    $500
Feasibility & Outreach                                $1,000
Printing                                $1,000
                                        -  
Miscellaneous                                $1,000
Total Quarterly                              $7,500
         
Total Costs                           $45,000

 

Please note that this LOI is not a complete proposal. We intend to deliver a complete proposal to your office by the required May deadline.

 

            Thank you for your interest and support.

 

            Best regards,

 

Tyler Brittain  

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Edward D. Blum
Supplementary Documents:

Keraton

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

Dear CSF Committee,

I am submitting this letter of intent to notify the CSF of the Indonesian Student Association at the University of Washington (ISAUW)’s intent to submit a funding request for our annual campus event, Keraton, which will take place on May 5th, 2018, at the Rainier Vista- University of Washington.

Keraton is one of the largest Indonesian cultural events in the West Coast. Over the past few years, Keraton has been ISAUW’s biggest and fastest growing annual event that attracted over 9,000 people in 2017 and are currently expecting 10,000 visitors.

Last year, we managed to minimize the environmental impact of our event by implementing “Keraton going green”. This was done by requesting our vendors to use all compostable materials for food packaging and informing all of our visitors of the locations of recycling and compost bins within the event location. As for this year, aside from implementing our previous methods, we plan to also promote environmental awareness by incorporating it in a performance during Keraton. While our creative management department has also been working on this new idea, we have also put out an application for groups who would like to volunteer to perform with the focus of educating guests on environmental issues. We hope that through these performances, guests will gain more insight on the current situation of our environment while also being entertained.

With the event being fully organized and managed by students, ISAUW also helps to develop the students’ leadership and organizational skills by trusting each department with tasks to make the event successful. In addition, we also create opportunities for students all-over the campus to get involved with our event by accepting volunteers- by volunteering with ISAUW, students will be able to utilize and develop their communication skills by engaging with guests, while also learning more about Indonesian culture, environmental issues, and gaining meaningful connections.

Based on the financial figures from our previous Keraton events, ISAUW has currently set its budget at $29,000, which has been partially covered by our fundraising events throughout the year. We have also been seeking for support from various companies and businesses by offering sponsorship packages, and applying for other campus funds, such as the diversity fund, ASUW, and other related resources.

I will be our main point of contact for the purposes of the application process and can be reached at:

  • E-mail address: jleevin77@gmail.com
  • Phone number: 206-861-5606

Thankyou for the opportunity to participate in the campus sustainability funding.

Sincerely,

Janice Leevin
Finance officer at ISAUW

 

 

 

 

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: janice leevin

Green Greeks Representative Program

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $3,900

Letter of Intent:

Summary:

As an accredited course, the Green Greek Representative Practicum teaches over 150 students per year about sustainability consulting within their community and environmental leadership. It encourages participation from Greek and non-Greek students in order to engage a broad campus community. Engaging this community deepens connections between the UW Program on the Environment, the UW Sustainability Office, the UW Greek Community, and a variety of different academic programs (as the program is extremely interdisciplinary). It allows students interested in sustainability to ideate, research, and implement solutions in a real-world, hands-on way. It also creates a ripple effect, propelling sustainability solutions far beyond just environmentally-focused students and ingraining sustainable living habits within a diverse group.

 

The growth of our program can largely be attributed to the funding we’ve received from the UW Office of Sustainability. However, due to budget cuts, they can no longer fund us. Thus we are hoping to receive $3,900 from the Campus Sustainability Fund to be able to continue the program and keep implementing sustainability solutions while we explore long-term funding alternatives.

 

View our Website: http://students.washington.edu/ecoreps/greengreek/ or learn more about the Program by viewing the Orientation Packet.

 

Meeting Requirements:

Environmental Impact: While the tangible environmental impact is seen in Chapter Houses specifically, the intangible benefits are far beyond the Chapters themselves. The Chapters represent a test-bed of sorts for students (both Greek and non-Greek) to experiment with different sustainability solutions and see how theoretically great ideas play out in reality.

 

We’ve helped Chapters significantly reduce waste, transitioned 14 Chapters to water-saving solutions as of Fall 2017, 5 Chapters to full-LED implementation, and helped Chapters invest in energy-efficient appliances. We’ve also increased awareness: we’ve put up posters, had cleaning and kitchen staff “interventions,” worked with House Directors to make sustainability a priority, and presented to Chapters on waste diversion and sustainability solutions (in which we get most of the members to take the UW Sustainability pledge as well).

 

If we get funding and are able to progress forward at the same rate, we plan to continue many of our current projects, including transitioning chapters to sustainable lighting, water, energy, and waste solutions. On top of this, we plan to continue and expand upon our current education initiatives, including a dramatic uptake in our Zero Waste Initiative for community events. We will also pilot new projects as the program grows.

 

Student Leadership & Involvement: The Green Greek group, open to both Greek and non-Greek students, has helped over 200 different environmentally-curious students get started implementing sustainability solutions within their living area and community. Over the past three quarters, we’ve had over 50 students register each quarter and have continued to grow. This Fall 2017, we had over 70 students register, and more than 40 register for credit. This type of high-engagement, hands-on opportunity is an excellent way to get students integrating sustainability into their daily lives, as well as promote the Program of the Environment and other environmental opportunities to a targeted audience. Funding from the CSF will allow us to continue providing this opportunity for students of all majors to easily become involved in sustainability courses.

 

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change: Our program has 8 to 10 projects each quarter. These projects focus on implementing waste, water, and lighting solutions; solar research, education and awareness, sustainable purchasing, and event planning. Students have the opportunity to pick what they’re most interested in and gain experience in that area. On top of this hands-on work, students also learn from expert speakers, who’ve included Sustainability Consultants from Sustainable Biz Consulting, the CEO of NuePower (a solar energy company in the PNW), and Sally Hulsman, the Director of Solid Waste Compliance at Seattle Public Utilities.

 

We work hard to promote collaboration, as well as other environmental groups on campus. Students get the chance to participate in mini-case competitions related to solving sustainability problems. They also do a take-home sustainability survey of a specific Chapter to learn more about the status of that Chapter’s sustainability and what it truly means to be live sustainably. Then they work on specific action items gleaned from the survey. Each quarter we do a Community-Wide Clean-Up, where not only our members but other campus members team up to beautify the UW community.

 

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability: The feasibility of the program is 100% with funding. I can guarantee this because we’ve been running it in a “pilot” mode for the past 2.5 years (since its creation in August 2015). We’re held accountable by Faculty Supervisors, including UW Sustainability Expert Sean Schmidt and the Director of the Program on the Environment Rick Keil. We’re also held accountable by the numerous Green Greek Leaders (currently 14, including the Executive Team and the Project Leaders). People within our program are mission-driven and committed to successfully carrying out projects as a team.

 

Estimate of Project Budget:

In order to continue improving upon the work we’re doing, we need funds for three main purposes:

  1. Marketing: 75 Fall Orientation packets, 60 marketing posters per quarter (1 per each chapter, as well as high-traffic on-campus areas), 1-2 large posters per year for events. This year the amount came to about $550 (all materials were purchased from Professional Copy n’ Print on the Ave or printed at the RSO Resource Center on campus).
  1. Accreditation: In order to be an accredited 1-2 course (which is an absolute game-changer in terms of engagement, participation, and follow-through), we must be able to fund an Undergraduate Teaching Assistant (essentially the Director position). This position organizes everything, from course materials, to the room location, to membership and project teams, as well as communicates directly with the Advising Faculty Rick Keil. The TA is paid for 50 hours per work per quarter at the wage of $15.30 (by University policy) for a total of $765 per quarter. This person works all three academic quarters, as well as during the summer to develop the program for the upcoming year. Thus, the total for the year comes to $3,060.
  1. Motivation & Incentives: In order to create value and community, we also need money for things like a prize for our annual Greek-wide competition ($100) and a small budget for our quarterly clean-ups ($200 / yr). The total budget for this is roughly $300.

Thus, the overall budget needs are roughly $3,900 for one year. We recognize how valuable the Campus Sustainability Fund is in getting projects going and helping them keep their momentum. We also recognize that in the long-term this program needs to be self-sustaining and can’t rely on CSF grants. We are in the process of securing funding from Greek Governance organizations who see the impact of our work in the community. However, in order to secure funding via their network we must go through a lengthy proposal process. This process has already been initiated. If the proposal is successful, we will have funding likely starting in January 2019. Thus, we hope the CSF can provide assistance in the meantime and help us keep the Green Greek momentum going as we build strong environmental leaders and implement sustainability solutions within the UW Community.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Sasha Gordon

Climate Panel Event

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $150

Letter of Intent:

Good afternoon,

I'm reaching out on behalf of Green Evans, the environmental policy RSO at the Evans School of Public Policy. We are hosting a panel event on February 13th, 7-8pm in Kane Hall Room 120 to spark discussion at UW and the surrounding community about the various climate policy proposals currently being considered for Washington State. We hope that attendees will walk away with a better understanding of how environmental sustainability issues are also important at the economic, social, and moral levels!

We are asking for $150 to cover travel for one of our panelists, Rosalinda Guillen. We apologize for reaching out to you so close to the event. We found out very recently that she needs travel assistance. For your information, the rest of our budget includes: 

  • $1108.12 from the Academic Student Employees Union (UAW4121), our co-sponsors for the event, who paid for the Kane Hall Reservation
  • $150 from the Union of Concerned Scientists to pay for coffee and donuts for our attendees 
  • $150 from the Science and Policy Institute to provide an honorarium to our moderator, Sarah Myhre

In regards to your criteria, our event discusses ways to reduce carbon emissions and the environmental impact of not only the University of Washington community, but also Washington State as a whole. This event is also entirely student-organized, all of us being undergraduate and graduate students in the Atmospheric Sciences, Oceanography, Philosophy, Molecular Engineering, and Public Policy departments. 

Our event reservation is paid for and the panelists are secured. We are in the midst of our outreach process now, and you can see the number of interested folks on our Facebook event page. Our sponsors include the GPSS Science & Policy Committee, Program on Values and Society, and the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Here is the full list of panelists: 

  • Jeff Johnson, President of the Washington Chapter of AFL-CIO, the largest federation of labor unions in the United States
  • Rosalinda Guillen, Executive Director of Community to Community Development, the Pacific Northwest's leader in food justice, immigration reform and farmworker rights 
  • Daniel Malarkey, Board Member on Washington CleanTech Alliance and previous Deputy Director of Washington's Department of Commerce
  • Nives Dolsak PhD, Associate Director of the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs and member of the Puget Sound Partnership’s Science Panel
  • Heidi Roop PhD, Communications Director for the Climate Impacts Group
  • Moderated by: Dr. Sarah Myhre, UW Oceanography Researcher, Climate Justice Activist and one of the Most Influential Seattleites of 2017

Let me know if you have any questions! 

Sincerely, 

Namrata Kolla

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Namrata Kolla

UW Anaerobic Digester: Food Waste, Renewable Energy & Public Health: Feasibility

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $10,000

Letter of Intent:

Project Title: UW Anaerobic Digester: Food Waste, Renewable Energy & Public Health

Summary: This Feasibility/Pilot Study would evaluate a) Site Location b) Custom-Design Review c) Ongoing Maintenance requirements for building a 160-square foot anaerobic digester on the UW Seattle Campus. The anaerobic digester would utilize food waste to produce renewable energy (biogas) and compost. The biogas and compost could be used for research projects by professors/students, and the methane gas could be used to generate electricity or power water boilers on the UW campus. The food waste would be provided by the UW Husky Union Building (HUB).

Environmental Impact: An anaerobic digester would have three main environmental impacts on the UW Seattle Campus: 1) Carbon Emissions: the anaerobic digester would utilize approximately 135lbs of food waste per day, so less food waste would be hauled from the UW campus to Cedar Grove Composting Facility. Reducing the amount of food waste that is hauled to Cedar Grove would reduce carbon emissions from garbage/waste disposal trucks that drive from UW to Cedar Grove. 2) Soil Health: an anaerobic digester would produce nutrient-rich compost that could be applied to the UW farm and Center for Urban Horticulture (and other locations on campus). 3) Renewable Energy: an anaerobic digester would be a small-scale model of how to generate renewable energy from food waste. The food waste is broken down by microbes, which produce methane gas, and the methane gas can be used to power a motor for electricity, heat water boilers, and other uses.

Student Leadership/Involvement: Student interest and leadership is primarily coming from a UW Registered Student Organization (RSO), called Global Sustainability Initiative (GSI). The undergraduate members include: Caelan Wisont, Zhaoyi Fang, Yushan Tong, and Kyler Jobe. GSI focuses on promoting sustainability on a global scale, emphasizing household-scale anaerobic digestion projects to create methane gas for stoves. GSI grew out of SafeFlame LLC, which was started by a UW MBA graduate (Kevin Cussen), and received a CSF grant in 2015-2016. GSI also connects interested students to anaerobic digestion projects and gets students excited about working with anaerobic digestion, renewable energy, and public health.

Education, Outreach & Behavior Change: We will conduct education/outreach for this project by: 1) Sustainability Studio (ENVIR 480): conduct a 15-20 minute presentation for the undergraduate students in this course at the beginning of each quarter, starting in Winter Quarter, 2018. ENVIR 480 focuses on sustainability, and a previous group of students from this course conducted a research project on anaerobic digestion. In Fall 2017, Aaron Flaster met with the instructor for ENVIR 480 and the instructor was open to having Aaron present to her students about the anaerobic digestion project. 2) Global Sustainability Initiative (GSI): GSI will conduct outreach to UW undergraduate students to build their membership and raise awareness about the anaerobic digester project. GSI will conduct outreach using tabling events, Facebook posts, and flyers.

Feasibility, Accountability & Accessibility: This is a Feasibility/Pilot Study proposal to determine whether it is realistic to move forward with a full project proposal in April 2018 to build an anaerobic digester on the UW Seattle Campus. This Feasibility Study will accomplish three goals: 1) Site Location: conduct an extensive evaluation to find an appropriate site on the UW campus for the anaerobic digester. This evaluation will be a collaboration between the UW Anaerobic Digester Project Leadership Team, UW Grounds Management, UW Landscape Architects, UW Design Review Board, and Impact Bioenergy. Impact Bioenergy (http://impactbioenergy.com/) is a business located in Seattle, WA. Impact Bioenergy designs/builds anaerobic digesters to utilize food waste and produce renewable energy and compost. Impact Bioenergy currently operates 3 anaerobic digesters in the greater Seattle area (1. Fremont Brewing Company (Ballard facility) 2. Pleasant Beach Resort on Bainbridge Island 3. Laser Cutting Northwest/CleanTech Manufacturing Accelerator. Impact Bioenergy has also built 2 more anaerobic digestion systems that are owned and operated by those customers (4. Microsoft (Redmond Campus) 5. Crooked Shed Farm (Carnation, WA). 2) Custom Design Review: if necessary, Impact Bioenergy will conduct a custom-design evaluation to tailor the anaerobic digester to the available site. If the available site does not require a custom-design anaerobic digester, then the funds in this Feasibility Study that are meant for Impact Bioenergy will be used towards the full proposal in April, 2018. 3) Ongoing Maintenance: determine whether the Sustainability Coordinator staff position (part of Grounds Management) can be the position that maintains the anaerobic digester on an ongoing basis (i.e. bring food waste from HUBanaerobic digester and monitor anaerobic digester readings, such as pH, temperature, etc.). With the permission of Grounds Management, we will have the Sustainability Coordinator log how many hours it would take to bring ~135 lbs of food waste from the HUB to a potential site location, every day for 5 days.
Leadership Team: Dr. Heidi Gough, PhD, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, hgough@uw.edu Dr. Sally Brown, PhD, School of Forest Resources, slb@u.washington.edu Dr. Marilyn Ostergren, PhD, UW Renewable Energy Liaison, ostergrn@uw.edu Aaron Flaster, BA, Research Coordinator, Department of Psychology, aflaster@uw.edu Global Sustainability Initiative (Registered Student Organization), gsiuw@uw.edu

Budget Estimate: $10,000
- Impact Bioenergy: $9,900 (custom-design evaluation/full project review)
- Sustainability Coordinator: $100 (1 hr per day, 5 days, moving food waste from HUB to potential site)

Contact Information:
Aaron Flaster, B.A.
Research Coordinator, Department of Psychology, University of Washington
Work email: aflaster@uw.edu
Personal Email: aaronflaster@gmail.com
Cell #: 415-497-5877

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Aaron Flaster

Population Health Facility Visible Rainwater System

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF:

Letter of Intent:

Summary:

Our plan is to assist in the construction of the rainwater treatment system and to put it in the lobby of the new population health building. We would include some sort of animated display, possibly interactive, to really involve people and show them how the water is filtered. We talked with Justin Stenkamp of PAE engineers and he believes that a great addition would be for EWB to design and create further filtration for the system that could be used for testing and research by faculty or other engineers. This further filtration could also make it possible to allow people to directly drink the water from the system if legislation for this is passed in the future. The research would be very beneficial and add a further academic component to the building opening up opportunities for testing and advancement in rainwater treatment technology. If we could design a system like this it would be great experience for EWB as well because it relates to projects we would do in our partner communities in other countries. This project will provide a learning aspect that is a very important part of the new building. It will show people the impact they’re having with a direct engineering display.

 

Environmental Impact:

There will be some water savings for the whole building due to the fact that we won’t be drawing from the city, but the primary impact will be educational. The system will be used for the toilets as well as potential landscaping so there will be some water saved from that.

 

Student Leadership & Involvement:

Our project will have a ton of student involvement, we will be working with a portion of the EWB local projects team as well as opening it up to any students who want to be involved.

 

Education, Outreach, Behavior Change:

This is where our project shines, EWB students will be researching and building this system which will provide them with an excellent experience. They will be able to apply this experience both to their resumes as engineers but also to the projects we take on in other countries which often involve rainwater purification. Students would also be getting experience working with professional engineers as we would work with PAE engineers to build the system. This will be very beneficial for the students regarding professional experience as well as networking. This project will also show every person who walks through the building the power of rainwater purification presenting it in an easy to understand and appealing way. We will also include a display to show how the system works.

 

Feasibility, Accountability, Sustainability:

We would have the guidance of professional engineers from miller hall on the design and building of the rainwater system. We have the long standing EWB structure to guarantee completion. We don’t envision any particularly unsustainable parts or processes.

 

Budget:

Justin’s rough estimate for the project was about $30,000 - $35,000. This is if we decide to go the route of adding extra filtration to the treatment system. Justin estimates that the extra filtration would cost a rough estimate of $25,000. The extra $5000 - $10000 would be in an animated display, potentially interactive, showing the impact and technology of the system.

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Andrew Lindgren

Project IF

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $30,000

Letter of Intent:

 

CSF Coordinator

Campus Sustainability Fund – Phase4 project

University of Washington

 

Dear CSF Coordinator:

 

We are writing to gauge the Campus Sustainability Fund’s (CSF) interest in supporting the feasibility study of using fourth phase water on the most advanced indoor agriculture technique, aeroponics, to help to grow fresh food not only effectively and organically but also locally, here on the University of Washington campus.

 

Introduction

Why Fourth Phase Water?

Water, the blood of plants, must not be taken for granted when attempting to solve the global food crisis. In two decades of research, Prof. Pollack has discovered a fourth phase of water, the newly identified interfacial phase of water, that commonly exists in nature, and in both animals and plants. To date, there are ample of scientific reports show that the fourth phase water is different from bulk water physically and chemically. Most importantly, there was the study[1] published early this year demonstrated that the fourth phase water can improve germination and sprouting of plants dramatically. The improvement was confirmed by an UW spun-out, 4th-Phase, Inc., that using fourth phase water, the root length can be improved by 50% on average, sample size is close to 100.

Why Aeroponics?
Aeroponics is an indoor agriculture technique that grows plants in a mist environment without soil. However, unlike hydroponics, it uses fine droplets to deliver necessary water and nutrient to the root of plants. When the droplet size is controlled within the range similar as the porous size on the root, the plant can absorb the water and nutrient more efficiently. This not only helps to further preserve water but also allow the plants to uptake the nutrient more effectively. Moreover, because the root is exposed in air with easy access to oxygen, generally, aeroponics plants thrive better than hydroponics plants.

In sum, combining the advantage of the water engineering from Pollack’s lab (Bioe, UW) and the advanced aeroponics agriculture technology, Phase4 aims to demonstrate the potential societal/environmental impact of maximizing water’s ability to fuel plants.

 

Environmental Impact

It is estimated that global crop production will need to double by 2050 to feed the population[2], and it is clear that we need to find a solution to feed a growing population. Indoor farming is believed to be the future of agriculture. However, even growing crops aeroponically has been proved to be able to save 95% of the water (in USA, 75% of water is used in agriculture) with higher yield than the traditional farming, but the cost is still too high. Improving indoor farming efficiency and reducing its cost is a large-scale problem that many engineers and scientists are working towards. Efforts are focused on reducing labor costs by increasing the degree of automation, reducing utility costs by using more efficient lighting, and using smart control system enabling advanced AI in agriculture to improve yields. But this doesn’t seem like enough. The rate of growth in global crop yields is not growing fast enough[3], and doubling the world’s food production will require many breakthroughs in crop science using technology that is new, groundbreaking, and has the potential to feed billions.

 

With the CSF support, Phase4 can help to solve the global food crisis collaboratively by conducting the feasibility study to demonstrate the potential benefit of combining fourth phase water and aeroponics technology.

Student Leadership and Involvement
Our team is well equipped to complete this project successfully. Kurt Kung, our team leader, has 8+ years of experience on the fourth phase water research and rapid prototyping development throughout his doctoral education at the UW. Our project currently has a staff mentor, Dr. Gerald Pollack, who has been an integral part of this project and will continue to support our group throughout the duration of the project timeline. Jacob Rodriguez, our team member has 3 years of R&D experience and currently enrolled in the Master program in Material Science, UW.

Education, Outreach, and Behavior Change
The problem Phase4 try to solve is by no means trivial. Anything that we can do to raise the public awareness on this shortcoming global food crisis and engage more students and staff on campus to be part of our project can improve the odds of success. Besides requesting support from CSF, we also plan to participate the Environmental Innovation Challenge (EIC) and the Business Plan Competition (BPC) at UW in early 2018. From experience, we know competition is one of the best way to recruit students on meaningful project and expose the project quickly and effectively in the local community medias.

In addition to being led by a group of UW students, this project will also engage the campus community by being visible in prominent campus buildings. We are currently conducting outreach to Fluke Hall to install the feasibility test aerponics system in the green house on the top floor of Fluke Hall. The residents of Fluke Hall are UW CoMotion center and Student MakerSpace, which are beneficial to the Phase4 project for the talents recruitment and the technical support to engage more resource at UW.

 

Feasibility, Accountability, and Sustainability
The CSF has expressed a special interest in growing food not only efficiently with the minimum footprint but also organically and locally on campus. Our aeroponic system will fulfill that goal while also engaging the campus community around this cutting-edge technology.

The goal of the Phase4 project is to develop the state of art aeroponic system using fourth phase water technology to provide enough vegetable for the cafeterias to feed students, staff and faculties on UW campus and eventually expands the technology for broader applications. With the support from CSF, we can conduct the feasibility study as the first step to achieve our goal. The success criteria in the feasibility study phase is to demonstrate the improvement on total biomass of plants by using fourth phase water, and provide the critical data to estimate the cost and square footage to feed the people on campus.

We estimate the total cost of this project to be $75,000. These funds will be used specifically for the development of the fourth phase water enabled aeroponic test system to be installed on the UW campus. We are fortunate enough that we already have a commitment from Professor Pollack to support 1/3 of the fund ($25,000) and a commitment from 4th-Phase, Inc., an UW spun-out start up, to support another 1/3 of the fund ($25,000). So we only need CSF to match the last 1/3 of the fund ($25,000) to kick off the project. We will provide a more detailed budget if we are selected to submit a full proposal.  Moreover, potentially, we will have additional funding from UW EIC and BPC to provide extra support to the Phase4 project. Our team emphasizes the importance of diversifying our funding sources, and will continue our ongoing search for funding opportunities throughout the entirety of our project timeline.

Funding provided from the CSF will go directly toward the development of our product. In the immediate term, we’ve broken our project’s timeline into two phases. The first phase includes the physical development and installation of fourth phase water enabled aeroponics system over the next six months. The second phase includes plants testing, data collection, and further improvement on the system if needed.

We hope to have the opportunity to submit a full proposal with additional information for your further review. Please feel free to contact us with any questions or comments in the meantime. Thank you very much for your time and consideration, we look forward to hearing from you.

 

Sincerely,

 

Kurt Kung                                             Jacob Rodriguez                                          

Senior Research Fellow                       Master Student

Bioengineering, UW                             Material Science, UW

206-685-2744                                      425-736-0439

ckung@uw.edu                                    jaroddy@uw.edu

 

         

 

 

 

[1] Abha Sharma et al., “QELBY®-Induced Enhancement of Exclusion Zone Buildup and Seed Germination,” Advances in Materials Science and Engineering 2017 (2017): 1–10, doi:10.1155/2017/2410794.

[2] Yield Trends Are Insufficient to Double Global Crop Production by 2050

[3] Yield Trends Are Insufficient to Double Global Crop Production by 2050

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kurt Kung

Global Leadership Forum

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $420

Letter of Intent:

 

 

Summary of project proposal:

The societal problems we face transcend sectors and disciplines, and while businesses and organizations are well-positioned to solve them, they need responsible leadership. Unfortunately, the future situations students will find themselves in are ambiguous and difficult; determining what’s best for all stakeholders is challenging. The solution is not simply teaching students about corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability, but also entails giving them hands-on experiences with creative problem-solving about leading responsibly from where they stand.

This is why we three students, Henry Milander, Alex Urasaki, and Nabilla Gunawan, with support from the Global Business Center and Foster’s Certificate of International Studies in Business program (CISB), have formed a planning committee to found the Global Leadership Forum this spring, April 4th. Its purpose is to convene a campus-wide dialogue on CSR and sustainability in different sectors, and provide practical creative problem-solving experiences for students. A campus that doesn’t speak to these issues in a sustained and comprehensive way is letting its own students down by not properly preparing them for a present and future that demands, if not depends on, greater social responsibility and sustainability in leadership.

The Forum will focus on responsible leadership in socially-responsible business, tech, public health, and environmental policy, all in a global context. Through its workshop format, the Forum will provide a space for UW students and the Seattle community to engage with real-world cases and discussions on topics related to leading responsibly and sustainably in world. The element of leadership we believe most fundamental is the willingness to learn from everyone and everything, and help others do the same. In the end, the format of our Forum is about helping students become hands-on learners in the field of CSR and sustainability so that when they face ambiguous situations or companies with dubious corporate governance, they can act responsibly and teach others to do the same.

Date: Wednesday, April 4th (4/4/18)

Time: 5:00-8:00

Location:

  • Anthony’s Forum in Dempsey Hall (Introductory Panel)
  • Classrooms in Paccar Hall (Breakout Sessions)
  • Deloitte Commons in Paccar Hall (Reception)

Expected Attendance: 150-200 students

Format: Introductory Panel > 2 Rounds of Workshops > Reception

5:15-5:30 – Start (Until 5:30 it’s check-in, taking seats, drinks, and mingling)

5:30-5:35 – Opening Remarks + Overarching gravitas

5:35-5:45 – Introductions by Workshop Speakers

5:45-5:50 – Transition Period/ Head to first breakout rooms

5:50-6:30 – Workshop Round 1

6:30-6:35 – Transition Period/ Head to second breakout rooms

6:35-7:15 – Workshop Round 2

7:15-8:00 – Reception

Workshop Categories

  1. Business Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility
  2. Population/Global Health
  3. Sustainability and Innovation in the Tech World
  4. Environmental Public Policy and Impact Reporting

Lead RSO: Certificate of International Studies in Business (CISB)

Co-Sponsors: Global Business Center, Net Impact UW, and ReThink

Co-Conspirators (Planning Committee): Henry Milander, Alex Urasaki, Nabilla Gunawan

Brief explanation of how the project will meet the requirements and preferences of the CSF:

  1. Environmental Impact

This kind of public education can have huge implications for how our students come to act mindfully as future leaders, and think creatively about bringing their actions in harmony in our complex world of diverse stakeholders. Students going into public policy, research, business, and health organizations can lead change in their roles for policies, practices, and innovations that help mitigate and heal our environment. With responsible leaders in government, corporations, and research institutes , these entities can be more easily enlisted in improving community health, green tech innovation, and ending global hunger. Moreover, students who attend the forum and get involved with environmentally-minded RSOs as a result of mingling at the reception or working together in the workshops will go on to strengthen their RSO’s projects and create a more sustainable campus.  

  1. Student Leadership & Involvement

Any project or change that has progressed in history surely hasn’t come about through one person. Teamwork is a perquisite for achieving lasting change and is a product of its members’ willingness to serve, learn, and lead. The Forum’s primary student leaders are Henry Milander from Certificate of International Studies in Business, Alex Urasaki from ECOREPS, and Nabilla Gunawan from Net Impact UW. Surrounding these personae dramatis are the members of the RSOs and programs they represent. It is our belief that the Forum’s success rests on the involvement of students from all disciplines on campus. It was a student’s idea that bore the idea for a forum, and it has been student energy and consultation that has evolved the idea to its present state, and will continue to do so in the years to come.

  1. Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

The Forum will quite possibly be students’ first step in engaging with and discussing sustainability and social responsibility in a global context. The Forum offers the very practical experiences that teach students, hands-on, how to become learners in complex and sensitive fields so that when they face ambiguous situations they can act responsibly and teach others to learn how to do the same. The strategies and experience developed through this project will thus continue to help students in serving their communities.

Several learning goals the planning committee has for the students that attend the Forum are to:

  1. Grow students’ awareness of ethical, health, business and environmental considerations in an international context through experience in practical application
  2. Build students’ creative problem-solving ability through cases and discussions that span different cultures and national contexts
  3. Connect students from different backgrounds to different RSOs and campus organizations that strive to continue the conversation through real application

Collaborating with diverse groups at the UW and leveraging cultural and ideological differences is important to producing an event that serves the many sub-communities at the UW. The planning committee’s members came together in part because they believe they can conduct outreach and engage with UW’s diverse sub-communities and RSOs, and in doing so, make this even a forum for students and RSOs.

Changing behavior is necessarily hard; we are, after all, creatures of habit. Notwithstanding this, the Forum seeks to take students down one step of the way in a learning process of how to effectively advocate and express their ideas for sustainability and social responsibility. Each student will bring their own background and beliefs with them of course, however, all we can hope to achieve is to contribute to a conversation that night, and encourage them to continue it the next day.

  1. Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

Each planning committee member has experience with outreach and large event planning, and a familiarity with the Forum’s key concepts of social responsibility and sustainability in global leadership. Be it through planning the Global Health Business Case Competition, a national conference on UN MDGs in Indonesia, or presiding over the ECOREPS program, it is our collective experience that has guided, and will continue to guide our efforts and ambitions for the Forum.

While we each hold each other accountable for our commitments and action items, we still have regular check-ins with our mentors at the Office of Sustainability (Sean Schmidt) and Global Business Center (Theresa Maloney), the latter of which helps with logistics and administrative support. We also look forward to working closely with CSF staff if awarded a small grant in order to ensure funds are used properly, as well as to share any ideas on how to improve the forum or post-event efforts.

Institutionalizing the Forum and its values is the very task students who attend our discussions and forum will be charged with when they go on to advocate for responsible leadership in their own organizations. However, we the planning committee plan to use this first year’s results in determining how best we move towards institutionalizing the project. It is planned that CISB’s leadership team for 2018-2019 will have a Responsible Global Leadership chairpersonship who will represent CISB in the annual forum and ensure intra-program events and discussions continue to address and incorporate CSR and sustainability.

We, the planning committee, also plan to develop an ECOREPS position over the spring and summer quarters to continue leading campus-wide discussions on responsible leadership. In the long-term, this project’s goal is to establish a Center for CSR, and offer a minor open to any UW student, similar to SeattleU and UW-Tacoma’s centers. This will not be an overnight process. The fact that initiatives like the Global Reporting Initiative and the Paris Climate Accord are still being improved demonstrates how positive change must be doggedly pursued. Support from this grant will help ensure this dogged pursuit continues long after the members of this Forum’s planning committee graduate.

Through community engagement, hands-on work with questions of ethics and CSR, and the chance to foster deep relationships with extraordinary people, we believe this project will stay with the UW community for years to come, and better prepare students to be responsible leaders in their careers, and operate therein successfully.

Estimated Project Budget

Total Planned Expenses: $1420

  • Venue Fee ($140)
  • 2 Poster boards (1 for advertising, 1 for day-of event details - $70)
  • Catering of Food and Drink for 150 people ($1000)
  • Parking permits for speakers ($100)
  • 20 color tabloids ($100)
  • Quarter sheets for advertising ($10)

Project Timeline

Planning Committee Meeting Timeline (Mondays 3:30-4:30pm)

1/29, 2/12, 2/26, 3/12, 3/26, 4/2, 4/15
 

1/29 - Reach out to Speakers

2/7 -  Finalize logo and promo materials

      - Listserv blurbs, quarter sheets, full size posters (print and digital)

2/8 - Finalize Facebook event page and make public

2/9 - Increase Outreach Efforts

      - Share and promote event on Facebook
      - Deliver quartersheet handouts to advising offices and desks
      - Contact school listservs (GBC, JSIS, etc)

      - Advertise event on Trumba

2/26 - Addend RSVP google form to Facebook event and promo materials

2/28 - Finalize Speaker List
3/28 - Finalize Volunteer List

       - Set-up, Room Leads, Clean-up

4/4 - Global Leadership Forum (Manage Day-of Logistics)

4/6 - Send out Feedback surveys to Volunteers, Participants, and Speakers

4/15 - Planning Committee Meeting to assess efforts and determine path forward for

next year

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Henry Milander

Matsuri 2018

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $999

Letter of Intent:

Project Proposal

UW Matsuri has been the Japanese Student Association's main annual event for over 10 years. Matsuri, meaning festival in Japanese, is an event where we display the rich culture of Japan with delicious Japanese food, festive and thematic Japanese games, and many exciting and traditional performances. Along with the many foods that we sell, we create a lot of waste in the form of plates, utensils, napkins, and water bottles, among others. As a culture, Japanese society has increased its efforts to protect the environment through more efficient waste management and better technology to reduce resource consumption, and to reflect this we in the Japanese Student Association would also like to take the initiative to make our event and our attendees more aware of the environmental impact. As a student led event run primarily by the officers in the RSO and other student volunteers, we hope to begin making this push for a more sustainable event for this Matsuri and all future Matsuri's to come, and through this funding we hope to significantly reduce waste on campus at our 600 attendee event. Not only that, we really strive to educate both our staff and our attendees through volunteer orientations and allocating more volunteers to monitor waste disposal to ensure that all of our new biodegradable ware will be properly disposed.

Althought it will be a challenge, we are confident that by working with the HUB and through our own careful planning and budgeting, we will be able to eliminate all plastic waste at our event. Regarding the specific uses of our funding, we will primarily focus on biodegradable tableware and utensils, which we estimate will cost us $400 to completely replace our old plastic ware. In addition, we will focus on getting water dispensers to eliminate plastic water bottle waste, which we estimate will cost us $600 to purchase. With any remaining money, we will focus on creating signage for the event to help people correctly dispose of their waste during the event, which, along with the water dispensers, can be reused for all of our future Matsuri events.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Michael Hom

Youth Engineering Green Solutions to Stormwater Runoff and Pollution Prevention

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

 

Recent research reveals that everyday activities of individual citizens are now the leading source of toxic chemicals flowing into the Puget Sound. [1]  Of the approximately 40 thousand metric tons of oil and grease entering the Puget Sound every year about “75% of it comes from stormwater runoff that starts in our neighborhoods.”[2]  In addition to chemical pollution, stormwater runoff can cause an array of other environmental problems including flooding and erosion of our streams and rivers, siltation of salmon spawning grounds, and thermal and nutrient pollution.  These changes can make an ecosystem less hospitable to life and can negatively impact vulnerable species.  Educating about a problem is the first step in changing behavior.

 

The new “Youth Engineering Green Solutions to Stormwater Runoff and Pollution Prevention” field trip program is being developed through a unique collaboration between the University of Washington Botanic Garden (UWBG) and the UW College of Education (UW COE).    The proposed project would fund the pilot of an educational fieldtrip program geared towards fostering environmental stewardship and raising awareness about stormwater, its impacts on Puget Sound and potential engineering solutions.  As part of his master’s project, Brian Carpenter will help develop the curriculum and then participate in piloting the program to elementary-age students (3rd-5th grade).  Fieldtrips will be offered on the UW’s Seattle campus at the Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH), one of two sites that comprise the UW Botanic Gardens. If successful, UWBG will explore the possibility of incorporating the fieldtrip into its established elementary school fieldtrip programming.

 

During the proposed 120-minute fieldtrip, students will consider and discuss what they can do at their schools to address the environmental problems associated with stormwater runoff.  The pilot curriculum has a strong interdisciplinary and applied Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) focus. The pilot also intends to address teachers’ identified need for instructional assistance with the engineering and science process components of the new science standards (Next Generation Science Standards). 

 

As part of the field trip, students will work in small groups with a manipulable tabletop model of urban stormwater runoff.  The data collected during this initial model run will be saved for later use as a baseline comparison point to help assess the success of their engineered solutions.  Students will then explore green stormwater engineering solutions present at CUH and through hands on interactive activities. They will apply their newly acquired knowledge to re-design the initial model and engineer their own stormwater solutions.   Students will compare and contrast the data collected for the two model runs to determine the success of their engineering design solution and help identify areas for improvement.  

 

Over the course of the fieldtrip students will use the science and engineering process to develop problem-solving skills and brainstorm pollution prevention and stormwater runoff solutions. Through hands on learning about possible solutions, students will be empowered to care and take action now and in the future to improve Puget Sound’s water quality and protect our environment. 

Category Item Description Needed Amount Total Cost
       
Model Development      
  Needed supplies for 6 models includes:    
  Sponges 18 $25
  Sphagnum moss                      3 bags $20
  Plastic 5 gallon buckets 6 $12
  Large plastic tubs ~(12 in. deep X 16 in. long X 8 in. wide) 6 $170
  2" x 2" wood or 1" X 1" wood two 6-ft. long pieces $20
  Plywood 6 in. x 5 in. 6 $20
  Plastic measuring cups or graduated cylinders 24 $80
  Stop watches 6 $40
  Cheese cloth                      2 bags $13
  Misc. additional supplies   $100
       
                                                     Total:             $500
       
       
Hands on Learning Activities Bouncy balls/soccer balls/basket balls 3 $18
  Buckets 6 $12
  Misc. supplies   $20
       
                                Total:                $50
       
Administrative Costs Bus rental fee assistance for schools to defray transportation costs @ $150/bus 2-3 pilots $450
       
                                  Total:             $450
       
                 PROJECT TOTAL:      $1,000

 

 

 

[1] Salish Sea Currents, UW Puget Sound Institute, https://www.eopugetsound.org/sites/default/files/features/resources/SalishSeaCurrentsBooklet2014.pdf, p. 12

[2] Seattleites Construct Rain Gardens to Curb Pollution from Stormwater Runoff, PBS News Hour, https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/seattleites-construct-rain-gardens-to-..., Dec 8, 2011.  

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Amy Hughes

Implementing Sustainability: Bamboo toothbrushes for UW Dentistry

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $900

Letter of Intent:

Dear CSF,

I am requesting funds to create a sustainable change for UW campus. For my senior capstone project, I am pursuing the idea to help UW Dentistry change from giving out plastic toothbrushes to it’s patients to bamboo toothbrushes. This change will save thousands of plastic toothbrushes from ending up in a landfill and in oceans a year. Plastic takes millenial to break down and is already extremely harming our wildlife and nature. Bamboo is a more sustainable option as it grows fast and biodegrades. The company “Brush with Bamboo” manufactures and sells these toothbrushes. Unfortunately, this company is not large enough to sell their toothbrushes in bulk to dentists at as a competitive price as the plastic ones. Therefore, I am requesting funds to provide the first batch of toothbrushes to UW Dentistry for “free” as a trial. I also plan to create a strategic business plan that will convince UW Dentistry to pay for the toothbrushes with their own budget once this supply runs out; therefore creating a long lasting sustainable change. I am also applying to the “Community, Environment and Planning” grant called the ‘Community Support Grant’ to hopefully match the amount of money the CSF supplies as well. Implementing this change will deeply reduce the amount of plastic that UW is responsible for, giving UW another metric to add to “UW Sustainability Metrics”.

This is my very own project, as it is for my Senior Capstone Project. This idea was born last spring semester in my group project for the class “Attaining a Sustainable Society”. I am now taking the implementation process into my own hands. This project is completely student run and organized.

First, there will be a natural form of education and awareness that patients will encounter when they receive a free bamboo toothbrush after their appointment at UW Dentistry. I will also be conducting and organizing a community beach cleanup on Earth Day, April 22nd, 2017. This event is intended to get people involved and engaged in the need for reducing their own plastic footprint. It would be ideal to hand out a free bamboo toothbrush to the participants as well!

The people holding me accountable for this project are the program managers of my major, “Community, Environment and Planning”: Kelly Hostetler, Megan Herzog and Chris Campbell. Throughout winter and spring quarter I will be enrolled in a “Senior Project” class, a requirement for my major. This class holds us accountable and provides resources for success as well. Thanks to these forms of accountability, I feel completely supported, capable and responsible to complete this project. In addition, last spring quarter I took the class MGMT 440: Business Consulting. This class provided a real life scenario with a local boxing company that needed consulting. My group and I were responsible for doing everything that a paid business consulting company would complete. This included a business plan, many meetings with the client, much research and a final presentation to the client. Engaging in this project gave me the skills that I plan on repeating for UW Dentistry.

I am requesting $900.00 from the CSF as there is a 15% discount from “Brush with Bamboo” if a customer orders 10 cases at $90.00 each. The leftover money after the discount is being budgeted for shipping costs. Below is the pricing sheet provided by “Brush with Bamboo”

This timeline shows my plan according to my Capstone Project Proposal that I have already submitted to my major.

 

Dec 6th, 2017 Turn in proposal
Dec 6th, 2017 Contact brush w. bamboo, obtain price sheet
Dec 15th, 2017 Contact UW Dentistry about the project idea
DEC 15th, 2017 Apply for CSG and CSF
JAN 30th, 2018 Create Business proposal for UWD
JAN 30th, 2018 Receive Funding (hopefully!)
JAN 30th, 2018 Place order for toothbrushes
Feb 15th, 2018 Receive toothbrushes
FEB 15th, 2018 Business presentation to UWD
Feb 30th, 2018 Contact whoever is in charge of UW sustainability metrics
March 1st, 2018 Contact the school paper and or a local paper (ex: the stranger) about the change on campus!
March 1st, 2018 Deliver toothbrushes!!
March 2nd, 2018 Research community beach clean ups
March 5th, 2018 Advertise beach clean up
April 22nd, 2018 (earth day!) Implement beach clean up

 

I am sincerely excited to implement this project. Thank you so much for your time and consideration. If you would like my full Senior Project Proposal, please don’t hesitate to ask!

 

Thank you,

Isabelle de Mozenette

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Isabelle de Mozenette

Africa NOW: Unlocking Potential From Within

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $8,000

Letter of Intent:

Background:

Africa is a continent with abundant resources and limitless potential that generally goes unacknowledged around the world. It’s no secret that Africa is a wealthy country that has been exploited and taken advantage of for centuries and this exploitation continues to this day. The biggest difference now is that the world is finally starting to take notice of Africa’s potential. With billions of foreign dollars flowing into developing African countries, development in these countries needs to be led by individuals that put societal and environmental sustainability at the forefront of future growth. The best way to achieve this is by listening and supporting the people within these countries to make sure these burgeoning societies are being built and shaped by shared ideals.

 

Project Summary:

Many young professionals in Washington have been afforded the opportunity to pursue higher education and specialize in fields that have essential roles in the sustainability and progress of their country.

Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Incorporated plans to host a conference designed to supplement these essential skills and inspire guests to use these skills to build a sustainable future for Africa NOW.

Through industry specific workshops, networking, action based resources, artists, and an all-star panel we’ll inspire and equip students to turn Africa's "potential" into a reality.

 

Event Details:

 

Our target audience is young professionals in the state of Washington with an age range of 18-25. We plan to have 300 people in attendance. The conference will be held at the Intellectual House and Paccar Hall on May 19th from 12pm - 7pm. Lunch and refreshments will be provided throughout the day.

 

Student Leadership & Partners:

Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity is currently working with several student organizations including, African Student Association, Black Student Union, Minority Association for Pre Health Students, the Black Student Commission, and the National Society of Black Engineers. Some of the public organizations that we are currently working with are the African Chamber of Commerce, Africa Town, and the National Association of Real Estate Brokers. At the beginning of winter quarter we’ll be hosting a regional meeting with black organizations from all three UW campuses along with black organizations from Washington State University, Seattle Pacific University, and Seattle Central. Partnering with local colleges will allow us to more easily target our audience and gain statewide visibility for our cause.

 

CSF is an important part of our community that is fostering students to think about sustainability as a necessary but most importantly as an attainable goal on campus and around the world. We believe that CSF's involvement in our project could be extremely beneficial to our cause because we’re promoting sustainability in an unconventional way that’s just as important as traditional approaches.

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kolawole

60 Second Sustainability: A Video Game for Sustainability at UW

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $25,737

Letter of Intent:

EarthGames would like to build a video game for mobile phones and tablets that educates students about sustainability actions they can take on campus and promotes sustainability RSOs that they can participate in.  

 

Earlier this month at the Sustainability Game Jam (sponsored by CSF), a team led by EarthGames lead designer Samuel Dassler built a game prototype called "60 Second Sustainability."  The game is made up of many "microgames," which is a style popularized in games like the WarioWare series.  A round of microgames is frantic: you play approximately 10 of these mini-games within a single minute of play time.  The frenetic nature of a microgame-based app means that it can be used to communicate a large number of sustainability concepts in a short amount of time.  

 

The prototype currently includes actions such as putting your reusable bottle under the water tap to fill it up, raising a solar panel, bringing your own bag to the farmer's market, screwing in a more efficient light bulb, turning out the lights, and sorting waste into compost, recycling and garbage.  

 

The game was quite popular at the showcase after the jam, and won the Audience Choice Award for best game.  We are proposing to expand the game by making the actions more specific to UW, and co-designing microgames with various sustainability organizations on campus.  For instance, to support the SEED effort to encourage students to wash clothes in cold water using fragrance free powdered detergents, we could design a microgame in which the player changes a washing machine temperature setting to cold, and selects the right detergent within 4 seconds.  To help encourage proper waste disposal, we would depict the correct placement of items that when incorrectly sorted cause the most damage at UW, such as e-waste and liquid into paper recycling bins.  

 

Microgames often have an air of silliness to them, and it is important to us that any representation of an RSO is positive to a wide range of players.  In order to accomplish this, we would work closely with representatives from each RSO included in both preproduction and testing phases.  Initial responses from members of sustainability RSOs have been enthusiastic.  

 

A key component of this project is using existing, student-run sustainability initiatives to inspire the microgames and build awareness of the extensive work that student groups are already doing. Social science research shows that peer modeling is one of the most effective forms of behavior change.  By showcasing the work of student groups in these games, we will be drawing on the power of peer modeling to encourage other students to think and act sustainably.

 

We hope that the game would be frequently utilized in tabling events by EarthGames and also participating RSOs, in addition to downloads we will receive on the iOS and Google Play app stores, where the game will be posted for free.  In order to make the game appealing in a tabling context, we recognize that the look of the game must be particularly striking.  Microgame-based apps should work well in a group setting, with fast-moving content, simple rules, and difficult gameplay inspiring "just one more try" reactions from a crowd.  We think that a sustainability video game will encourage a whole new type of student to engage with sustainability activities.  

 

EarthGames is up to the task of developing a high-quality, visually appealing, and fun game in a short time and on a limited budget.  Our team includes undergraduate student artists and content creators, a professional game developer with significant experience working with student teams, a graduate student with extensive work in campus organizing, and a faculty liaison with a strong track record of supporting student outreach and engagement.  EarthGames has released 5 apps to the iOS and Google Play app stores, and shares game announcements and updates with a quarterly newsletter that is read by over 500 readers both on and off campus.

 

We would complete the first version of the game by the end of spring quarter, and finalize art during the summer.  We would organize a rollout event corresponding with Dawg Daze at the beginning of next year, to encourage new enrollment in the RSO and inform new students of sustainability actions they can take on campus.  

 

We are requesting funds to support:
Undergraduate student artist Rivkah Parent: 200 hours @ $20/hour *1.207 (benefit rate) = $4828
EarthGames lead designer Samuel Dassler: 11 weeks @ $1000/week *1.325 (benefit rate) = $14575
Graduate student community manager Judy Twedt: 150 hours @ $25/hour*1.207 (benefit rate) = $4526

Undergraduate student programmer: 100 hours @ $15/hour = $1810

Prof. Dargan Frierson: unfunded project manager

 

Total: $25737

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Judy Twedt
Supplementary Documents:

Earth Day Festival: A Celebration of Diversity and Unity of our World

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $125,000

Letter of Intent:

EARTH DAY FESTIVAL

“Think global, act local”:

A Celebration of the Diversity and Unity of the World

SUMMARY

With the current political climate steering us away from environmental and social justice, now is the time to take action. The UW Sustainability Action Network (SAN), in partnership with Earth Club, Arts & Entertainment (A&E), EcoReps, UW Hip Hop Student Association (HHSA), UW Sustainability and other partners, plans to bring a new level of student leadership and vision to the annual Earth Day celebration. This year’s Earth Day Festival will bring people together through performance, art, food, and activism in an immersive celebration of the unique identities and unity of the world. This festival will be a demonstration of sustainability in action both in its production and in its message. By showcasing the environmental and social initiatives on campus and demonstrating the intersectionality therein, we will provide a live example of the sustainability movement that is happening on campus.

We request $125,000 for this Festival to support national and local performers and speakers, commissioned art installations, professional staging equipment, marketing materials, locally-sourced food ingredients, and sustainable event infrastructure (to include solar power system, compostable materials, water stations, bio-toilets, and more). By combining the vision and leadership of some of UW’s most active and prominent student leaders with the resources and support of the UW, we hope to curate an unprecedented celebration of sustainability, diversity, and unity this coming Earth Day.

 

Environmental Impact:

This event will communicate and embody sustainable ideologies through the implementation of various media, inspirational performances, sustainable waste disposal, local food sourcing, and the use of renewable energy.

The Festival will feature food from around the world, prepared by an array cultural RSOs. Our organizing partners will provide RSOs with locally-sourced ingredients and supply compostable utensils. In addition, food waste will be diverted to local food banks or homeless shelters. These elements will be made possible through partnerships with campus organizations such as Real Food Challenge and Pairing UW Food Waste With Non-Profit Agencies in Need.

We intend to produce a 100% carbon-neutral event by using a solar-powered stage and providing CSF-funded biogas food carts to the food vendors. Compost and recycling bins will be onsite. There will be water stations and complimentary reusable water bottles to encourage reduction of disposable bottles.

 

Student Leadership & Involvement:

The Earth Day Festival will be 100% student-lead with the support of select faculty. The UW Sustainability Action Network will coordinate the collaborative leadership of its partners to showcase the growing sustainability movement at the University of Washington. The Festival will feature social justice in conjunction with environmental justice, unlocking vast opportunities for student groups in each area to showcase their work.

The festival’s many components (ie. Logistics, Programming, Food, Art Curation, Marketing, etc) will also provide specific opportunities for student leaders to drive these departments. The UW SAN Council is prepared and equipped to facilitate this process with the help of its key partners and faculty advisors.  

 

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change:

SAN is already developing a year-long marketing plan, drawing connections between the initiatives and events of its partners, and building toward the Earth Day celebration throughout the school year. The diverse mix of student involvement, through organizing, performing, exhibiting, or otherwise, will generate a vast draw that reaches throughout the campus.

The planning committee plans to create a compelling brand and story for the festival that wraps key environmental and social issues of today into a collective call-to-action. By creating an event that showcases student advancement of the world that we wish to create, the Earth Day Festival will appeal to audiences beyond the environmental community. To generate the scale of interest and impact that we are envisioning, we will book one nationally-known performer and one nationally-known speaker, both of whom embody the story that we wish to tell with the Earth Day Festival.

Part of the proposed budget is designated to the marketing plan, which will include physical materials such as posters and flyers, as well as social media marketing, and video and graphic content.

 

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability:

The planning committee currently consists of members of SAN, HHSA, EcoReps, and UWS, all of which bring extensive event-planning expertise. SAN is a coalition of campus organizations focused on environmental and social sustainability, which will serve as key collaborators that bring diverse perspectives to the event. The committee is also developing a partnership with UW Arts & Entertainment and ASUW. Throughout the planning process, the committee will develop key metrics and performance indicators to quantify the sustainability of the event.

The Earth Day Celebration is an annual event which has been primarily planned by UWS for the last several years. In addition, EcoReps has historically provided extensive support in planning this and other sustainability events on campus. The student leaders from these entities will easily secure infrastructure such as tables or tents, while providing prior knowledge as to the permits and permissions required for the event to take place. Faculty advisors in the CCCE, UWS, A&E, and ASUW will provide guidance and mentorship in navigating UW procedures.

The partnership with A&E will allow for professional stage production and programming. Their extensive experience organizing large-scale concerts on campus that feature national talent will be essential in making this year’s Earth Day celebration a historical event. The industry connections A&E holds with performers, speakers, and the channels for hiring them will also be essential in booking the necessary talent.

 

Contact Info:

Sky Stahl: stahls@uw.edu (509) 260-1105

Alex Urasaki: aurasaki@uw.edu (310) 567-4671

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Sky Stahl

Electric Outboard Motors, Sustainability for Washington Rowing

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $18,000

Letter of Intent:

Pure Watercraft Outboards, Sustainability for Washington Rowing

The University of Washington prides itself in being a world leader in sustainability and has a mission aimed toward teaching students to be leaders in the community, state, and the nation.  At Washington Rowing we pride ourselves in the pursuit of excellence starting with our athletics and extending it to our academics and professional lives.  As one of the university's oldest sports and one of the oldest intercollegiate sports in the country, Washington rowing wants to continue the longstanding tradition of excellence by being leaders and not reactionaries in everything that we do. The next step for Washington Rowing in our pursuit of excellence is to establish rowing as a sustainable sport and to reduce the environmental impact of not only our team, but the rowing community across the country.

On an average day, Washington rowing fields between 6 and 8 wakeless launches (coach’s boats) that follow crews through practice to coach and keep rowers safe on the water. Practices stretch between 15 to 35 km depending on the day. Taking an average of 7 launches going 25 km a day and approximately 245 collegiate practices a year (Including summer rowing) this adds up to 42,875 km of transport currently run by gasoline outboard engines.  That distance burns approximately 2,145 gallons of gasoline and requires yearly maintenance and frequent oil changes, adding to the environmental impact of the gasoline outboards.

Washington Rowing pursues excellence and is a leader in the rowing community in terms of sporting and technology. To adhere to and advance our mission our goal is to be community leaders in developing environmental sustainability for the sport of rowing.  With UW CFS we can achieve that goal and educate the rowing community around the country about the benefits of electric outboards.

Environmental Summary:

Annual fuel consumption for each launch is estimated at 310 gallons a year for the fleet which is equivalent to 1,240 kWh of energy.  On average, every kWh of electricity produced in Washington produces 0.26 lbs of carbon dioxide (CO2) well below the 1.22 lb average of the United States due to investment in renewable energy.  On the contrary 23.5 lbs of CO2 are produced when burning a single gallon of gasoline. Comparing the output of Pure Watercraft electric and the current gasoline outboards, Carbon emissions would drop by 6963 lbs of CO2, from 7,285 lbs to 322 lbs for the outfitted launch. Additionally, continual oil changes and maintenance of the gasoline engines (not necessary for the electric launches) produces additional carbon waste and pollution.

Student involvement:

There are two main focusses on student involvement for the project beginning which begins with the inception and planning of the project.  From the start Washington Rowing has designed this project to be student run with minimal involvement from coaches and administrators except when absolutely necessary.  I, Weston Brown, will be heading the project with involvement from 7 other students working on the project from business, environmental, and engineering backgrounds.  Beyond the proposal writing and research that goes into the project the majority of student involvement will be in outreach and community involvement. It will be the student’s role to help spread the knowledge of electric launches to other rowing teams both locally and abroad.  

Outreach:

    The rowing program here at the University of Washington has become a leading program within the domestic and international communities of rowing. With this standing, we have an opportunity and a responsibility to impact the community positively. Transitioning into electric motors within our own fleet of launches is only one step in creating a positive impact in the rowing community.

In addition to our own transition, we will work to educate others within the rowing community in efforts to help adapt electric launches into more clubs around the country. There are forty rowing programs within the Seattle area alone which provides us with incredible accessibility for outreach. Educating board members, athletes and coaches of local clubs about the footprint that rowing has on the environment could spark a movement towards a more sustainable rowing community here in Seattle. Eventually, we would expand our education efforts across the country and advise clubs all around the nation about Pure Watercraft Outboard and the positive impact the rowing community could have in the effort to aid our environment.

Economic feasibility:

    Washington Rowing is asking for a grant from the UW Campus Sustainability Fund to cover the cost of purchasing one coach’s launch with Pure Watercraft brand electric outboards.  Pure Watercraft is a Seattle company based in South Lake Union that will be distributing their first round of electric outboards in spring 2018.  While they have not yet released exact pricing for the dual battery pack model Washington rowing is interested in, the cost will be approximately $7,000 for the electric motor (the current Honda 25 horsepower outboards cost approximately $6,000 usd with annual gas and maintenance costs of $950 usd and $445 usd respectively). An electric engine would cost $7,000 usd but will save the team $14,000 over the next 10 years in fuel and maintenance costs.The additional $11,000 requested in this application is for the boat that the electric motor will be used with.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Weston Brown
Supplementary Documents:

Sustainability Consulting and Environmental Leadership Opportunity (Green Greek Representative Program)

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $3,900

Letter of Intent:

 

Summary:

As an accredited course, the Green Greek Representative Practicum teaches over 150 students per year about sustainability consulting within their community and environmental leadership. It encourages participation from Greek and non-Greek students in order to engage a broad campus community. Engaging this community deepens connections between the UW Program on the Environment, the UW Sustainability Office, the UW Greek Community, and a variety of different academic programs (as the program is extremely interdisciplinary). It allows students interested in sustainability to ideate, research, and implement solutions in a real-world, hands-on way. It also creates a ripple effect, propelling sustainability solutions far beyond just environmentally-focused students and ingraining sustainable living habits within a diverse group.

 

The growth of our program can largely be attributed to the funding we’ve received from the UW Office of Sustainability. However, due to budget cuts, they can no longer fund us. Thus we are hoping to receive $3,900 from the Campus Sustainability Fund to be able to continue the program and keep implementing sustainability solutions while we explore long-term funding alternatives.

 

View our Website: http://students.washington.edu/ecoreps/greengreek/ or learn more about the Program by viewing the Orientation Packet.

 

Meeting Requirements:

Environmental Impact: While the tangible environmental impact is seen in Chapter Houses specifically, the intangible benefits are far beyond the Chapters themselves. The Chapters represent a test-bed of sorts for students (both Greek and non-Greek) to experiment with different sustainability solutions and see how theoretically great ideas play out in reality.

 

We’ve helped Chapters significantly reduce waste, transitioned 14 Chapters to water-saving solutions as of Fall 2017, 5 Chapters to full-LED implementation, and helped Chapters invest in energy-efficient appliances. We’ve also increased awareness: we’ve put up posters, had cleaning and kitchen staff “interventions,” worked with House Directors to make sustainability a priority, and presented to Chapters on waste diversion and sustainability solutions (in which we get most of the members to take the UW Sustainability pledge as well).

 

If we get funding and are able to progress forward at the same rate, we plan to continue many of our current projects, including transitioning chapters to sustainable lighting, water, energy, and waste solutions. On top of this, we plan to continue and expand upon our current education initiatives, including a dramatic uptake in our Zero Waste Initiative for community events. We will also pilot new projects as the program grows.

 

Student Leadership & Involvement: The Green Greek group, open to both Greek and non-Greek students, has helped over 200 different environmentally-curious students get started implementing sustainability solutions within their living area and community. Over the past three quarters, we’ve had over 50 students register each quarter and have continued to grow. This Fall 2017, we had over 70 students register, and more than 40 register for credit. This type of high-engagement, hands-on opportunity is an excellent way to get students integrating sustainability into their daily lives, as well as promote the Program of the Environment and other environmental opportunities to a targeted audience. Funding from the CSF will allow us to continue providing this opportunity for students of all majors to easily become involved in sustainability courses.

 

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change: Our program has 8 to 10 projects each quarter. These projects focus on implementing waste, water, and lighting solutions; solar research, education and awareness, sustainable purchasing, and event planning. Students have the opportunity to pick what they’re most interested in and gain experience in that area. On top of this hands-on work, students also learn from expert speakers, who’ve included Sustainability Consultants from Sustainable Biz Consulting, the CEO of NuePower (a solar energy company in the PNW), and Sally Hulsman, the Director of Solid Waste Compliance at Seattle Public Utilities.

 

We work hard to promote collaboration, as well as other environmental groups on campus. Students get the chance to participate in mini-case competitions related to solving sustainability problems. They also do a take-home sustainability survey of a specific Chapter to learn more about the status of that Chapter’s sustainability and what it truly means to be live sustainably. Then they work on specific action items gleaned from the survey. Each quarter we do a Community-Wide Clean-Up, where not only our members but other campus members team up to beautify the UW community.

 

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability: The feasibility of the program is 100% with funding. I can guarantee this because we’ve been running it in a “pilot” mode for the past 2.5 years (since its creation in August 2015). We’re held accountable by Faculty Supervisors, including UW Sustainability Expert Sean Schmidt and the Director of the Program on the Environment Rick Keil. We’re also held accountable by the numerous Green Greek Leaders (currently 14, including the Executive Team and the Project Leaders). People within our program are mission-driven and committed to successfully carrying out projects as a team.

 

Estimate of Project Budget:

In order to continue improving upon the work we’re doing, we need funds for three main purposes:

  1. Marketing: 75 Fall Orientation packets, 60 marketing posters per quarter (1 per each chapter, as well as high-traffic on-campus areas), 1-2 large posters per year for events. This year the amount came to about $550 (all materials were purchased from Professional Copy n’ Print on the Ave or printed at the RSO Resource Center on campus).
  1. Accreditation: In order to be an accredited 1-2 course (which is an absolute game-changer in terms of engagement, participation, and follow-through), we must be able to fund an Undergraduate Teaching Assistant (essentially the Director position). This position organizes everything, from course materials, to the room location, to membership and project teams, as well as communicates directly with the Advising Faculty Rick Keil. The TA is paid for 50 hours per work per quarter at the wage of $15.30 (by University policy) for a total of $765 per quarter. This person works all three academic quarters, as well as during the summer to develop the program for the upcoming year. Thus, the total for the year comes to $3,060.
  1. Motivation & Incentives: In order to create value and community, we also need money for things like a prize for our annual Greek-wide competition ($100) and a small budget for our quarterly clean-ups ($200 / yr). The total budget for this is roughly $300.

Thus, the overall budget needs are roughly $3,900 for one year. We recognize how valuable the Campus Sustainability Fund is in getting projects going and helping them keep their momentum. We also recognize that in the long-term this program needs to be self-sustaining and can’t rely on CSF grants. We are in the process of securing funding from Greek Governance organizations who see the impact of our work in the community. However, in order to secure funding via their network we must go through a lengthy proposal process. This process has already been initiated. If the proposal is successful, we will have funding likely starting in January 2019. Thus, we hope the CSF can provide assistance in the meantime and help us keep the Green Greek momentum going as we build strong environmental leaders and implement sustainability solutions within the UW Community.

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Talia Haller, Green Greek Director

Biological Control of Insects

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

Dear Selection Committee, 

The University of Washington currently doesn't have a biological control of insects program. Insecticides which can be detrimental to the environment are periodically sprayed. With these releases the amount of insecticides used will be dramatically decreased. We will release insects that will survive the winter. Because of this we will only need to release them for two years to build up their populations. With this grant we will be able to release the following insects for control of Thrips and Aphids from the company Evergreen Growers:  

Aphidius colemani and ervi: 500 for $69

Aphidoletes aphidimyza: 1,000 for $43.50 x2=$87

Green lacewings/Chrysoperla : 10,000 eggs for 28$ x 5= $140

Orius: 1,000 for $69

Stratiolalaps scimatus: 25,000 in 2 liter bottles at $23 x 3=$69.

Trichogramma minutum: 100,000 for $21

Trichogramma platneria: 100,000 for $21

Shipping: $12.50

Total=488.50 per year

This program has been extenisvely researched and is being applied by Seattle University, the Woodland Park Zoo, and Washington State University. If the grant proposal is accepted it will help grounds management at the University of Washington become a more sustainable place. Any remaining funds will be used for signage to promote this CSF granted project. 

Thank you for helping us become more sustainable! If you have any questions please don't hestitate to ask. 

Sincerely, 

Michael Bradshaw 

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Michael Bradshaw

ReThink Resilience Summit 2017

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

THIRD ANNUAL RESILIENCE SUMMIT HOSTED BY RETHINK
 
I.  Letter of Intent
ReThink has held an annual Resilience Summit for two years, and both times our organization was lucky enough to work with CSF through partnerships and grants. This year the Summit focuses on incentives that a range of organizations experience, as we all face the need for climate action and improved resilience. This event is modeled after the Resilience Challenge hosted by Sustainable Seattle in the fall of 2014 and 2015. This year it will be held in Maple Hall’s Area 01 to encourage maximum attendance. We are teaming up with several clubs from across campus to draw an eclectic crowd of around 30-50 students. These students will spend 4 hours listening to in-depth presentations from our business professionals, engaging in question and answer sessions, discussing relevant topics in breakout sessions, and ending with individualized plans of action that may simply consist of a changed mindset, or even turn into future CSF proposals. With time for networking over tables of information from on-and-off campus partners, and lunch of sustainable, local food, we hope our audience will come away with a diverse set of perspectives and go forth driving change in business-as-usual practices. Beyond the experience members of the planning committee will gain from organizing and marketing this event, all participants of the Resilience Summit will get exposure to a diverse array of students from other disciplines, and informative and inspiring presentations and discussions from professionals in their fields of work. It is a fantastic opportunity for students to broaden their perspectives from the more narrow views represented in their respective majors.

A large part of the challenge is bringing students together to find the root cause of UW’s environmental issues in order to create a feasible solution including a plan of action. The 30-50 students attending the event are expected to be engaged and thoughtful members of the audience. Action post-event is not required, but will be highly encouraged and enabled by our team. We have invited speakers from Alaska Airlines, Forterra, Northwest Sustainable Energy for Economic Development (SEED), Threshold Investing Group, and Sustainable Business Consulting to speak about how their experiences, company, and/or mission approaches the concept of incentives in terms of climate action. For example: “Why does your organization choose to prioritize social and environmental initiatives and how are those goals achieved? How have you and your company reimagined traditional market structures to benefit the environment and what actions would you recommend others take to emulate your steps or drive their own sustainable path forward?”. We are expecting to obtain funds from the Foster Community Fund to help us support this event as it directly affects many students within the Foster School.

The monetary support of the CSF grant will enable us to perform the best possible outreach for the UW Resilience Summit in various relevant areas on campus in order to gain excitement and attendance that outweighs last year’s event.  Keeping our environment and UW’s paper reduction goals in mind, while still maximizing the potential for outreach to many attendees, we are planning to partially utilize ReThink grant money to create less than 20 eye-catching and aesthetically appealing posters that will illustrate the importance and quality of this event. ReThink has identified the most influential locations on campus that identify with the goals of this event and ReThink. These include, but are not limited to, the Foster School of Business, the Art and Design School, College of the Environment, Gould Hall, and the Paul G. Allen Center of Computer Science. The posters will be displayed in high-traffic areas, such as cafes and main entrances in order to attract the most attention. These posters complement our mainly digital marketing plan through our well known Facebook page, event page and targeted outreach of our board members and faculty contacts. Our multi-faceted marketing approach will maximize our outreach, and ensure that our environmental message will be heard loud and clear throughout campus.

The environmental problem that we hope to combat with this event is the same we’ve been working to oust for years previously: the widespread lack of education on pressing global environmental issues that UW students are broadly receiving. These issues apply to every student on campus in almost every academic discipline, yet not all students are required—or have room in their schedules—to take courses that touch on these issues, and independently sought information can often be misleading. Furthermore, though the University of Washington has undertaken many steps to be a sustainable campus, there is so much more that can be done, and we believe this starts with student education, involvement, and most importantly interest. The Resilience Summit thoroughly aligns with UW’s mission to sustainability. Even with such a broad term and definition, ReThink unites itself in all parts of all definitions in order to fully capture the meaning as it applies to business, industry, government, and individuals. ReThink is widely known across campus because of our work with the UW Sustainability Office, UW Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, and other environmental clubs around campus. We look forward to bringing this unique event to students from diverse educational backgrounds and hope to foster a learning environment where even our guest speakers can learn from others at this event.
______
II. Timeline
 
February 1- May 1 | Planning

  • Brainstorming
    • Partnerships
    • Funding Opportunities
  • Obtaining speaker confirmations
  • Creating marketing campaign
  • Gaining funding from CSF and FCF

April 14-28 | Implementing

  • Implementing Marketing → Outreach
    • Online first
    • Then to print and around campus
    • Start outreach to organizations, listservs

April 20- May 8 | Outreach

  • Earth Day Tabling
  • Sharing the Resilience Summit at other events
  • Sharing event opportunity in classes
  • Posting our small marketing posters around campus

May 8-May 19 | Final Stage

  • Final marketing push
  • Extreme outreach
  • Finalization of details with all speakers and partners

 
III. Budget

 

ITEM COST PER QUANTITY TOTAL
Speaker Fees
  • Most likely our corporate speaker/rep
$125 4 $500
Speaker Gifts $10 4 $40
Photographer $100 1 $100
Marketing Poster Board $20 1 $20
Materials for day-of break-out sessions
  • Big post it boards, post notes, markers
$10   $10
Venue Fee $330   $330
       
  = TOTAL $1,000

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Cassie Maylor

Earth Day Band: Improvisational Music Project (IMP)

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $500

Letter of Intent:

On April 21st Earth Club, in partnership with The Office of Sustainability and Ecoreps, is hosting The Earth Day Festival on Red Square from 11-2pm. The Earth Day Planning Committee has been searching for a band to play at our event. We believe that art is essential to the activism surrounding sustainability movements and often functions as a catalyst for engagement. In our search for a band, we focused our efforts on finding local UW student ensembles. Supporting the sustainability of the arts on the UW campus was an important value that helped aided our selection. We also considered that finding the right group could could help establish a precedent for collaboration for future events like the SustainableUW Festival. From the groups we looked at, our committee has identified the UW’s Improvised Music Project as an outstanding student organization that upholds many of our values and goals.
The IMP is an RSO run by Jazz students. The group focuses on bringing together musicians seeking to both advance their artwork and education. The IMP gives students an opportunity to: collaborate with each other, perform their music at local venues, play in a variety of organized ensembles, and to learn from professionals brought in by the RSO. The group consists of general members and several officers which organize events, and student ensembles. The shows played by IMP ensembles are free events where donation are accepted. Donations collected by the IMP are put into a fund that is used to bring touring professional musicians to the UW. The musicians then perform for the IMP and answer questions about their artwork.
The Earth Day Committee has been in contact with two of the IMP officers, Brendan McGovern and Schuyler Asplin. The two officers have agreed to organize an ensemble to perform at our Earth Day festival. The ensemble will consist of 6-10 performers. In addition to Brendan and Schuyler organizing the ensemble, the ensemble will be responsible for set up (15min), the performance (30min), and break down (15 min). As fair payment for for their performance, we want to award the group $50 for every performer erring on the side of 10 performers. In total, this application is asking for a grant of $500, payable to either Brendan or Schuyler, for the organization and performance of an IMP ensemble at our Earth Day Event. Brendan/Schuyler will then donate the funds into the IMP.
Addressing the CSF goals, the performance that will be funded by this grant will:

  • Impact the environment by attracting students to the Earth Day event. Music and the arts have galvanizing effects that bring people together and function as a catalyst through which activism for social and environmental issues can be fostered.
  • Support the student leadership of the Earth Day Committee who identified the IMP as an organization that will advance our goals for the Earth Day event. Additionally this grant will do more than acquire a band for Earth Day as the payment for the performance will go towards the advancement of the arts and the education of student musicians involved in the IMP. This includes supporting the student leadership of the IMP who, outreach to venues, organize ensembles, and plan events for their members in order to bring in professional musicians.
  • Increase our ability to outreach to students in the UW community. By supplying the incentive of a musical performance at Earth Day we will be able to attract a larger audience of students and expose them to the environmental message of our event.
  • Set a precedent for collaboration between the IMP and Earth Day. This sustainable relationship between the IMP and the Earth Day Planning Committee will be mutually beneficial and allow our committee to focus our efforts on enhancing other aspects of the event next year.
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Christian Laush

Keraton Going Green

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $999

Letter of Intent:

Since 2002, Indonesian Student Association in University of Washington (ISAUW) has held an annual cultural event, Keraton, to celebrate and promote Indonesia’s diverse culture. This year Keraton will be held on April 29th at the Rainer Vista, University of Washington. Throughout the event, we will promote our culture by selling various Indonesian traditional cuisines, hosting on-stage performances and cultural games. Our hope for Keraton is that it will not only attract Indonesian people in the greater Seattle neighborhood but also the whole Washington community. Last year Keraton managed to attract 8000 people and we are aiming to get 10000 this year to widen the exposure to Indonesian culture.
 
Based on our previous experience in hosting this event, we understand the environmental damages that an event as big as ours can pose. Consequently, this year we planned to implement a recycling program to minimize the amount of waste we produce. We hope that the funding from CSF can help us in this ‘Keraton Going Green’ effort.
 
In order to achieve the ‘Keraton Going Green’ effort, we will:
a.     We’ll demand all of our third-party vendors to only use compostable materials (food containers) to minimize our environmental footprint.
b.     Ensure that our event map lay out the locations of all the recycling and compost bins.
c.     Include our recycling efforts in our event marketing.
d. Assign ISAUW officers as well as volunteers to monitor the locations of all the recycling and compost bins to ensure proper sorting. 
 
To help us in this sustainability effort, we’re asking for a donation of $999.00 from CSF. We plan to use the funding we’ll receive to:
a.     Fund the compostable materials for vendors. ($500)
b.     Partially fund the renting cost of LED stage lighting to minimize our event’s energy usage. ($500)
 
1.     Environmental Impact: Not only did Keraton attracted 8000 people last year but also had 13 vendors selling food. As a result, there is a substantial amount of waste produced. This year, Keraton is aiming to attract 10000 people. Surely, there will be more waste produced than last year. Therefore ISAUW will implement the ‘Keraton Going Green’ effort, which will ensure the reduction of waste production by vendors as well as the overseeing of waste sorting in the recycling and compost bins locations.
 
2.     Student Leadership & Involvement: There are 39 ISAUW officers who have contributed their time and energy in making a huge event such as Keraton. Furthermore, there will also be about 123 volunteers that will help out in the event, whom of which are Indonesian students from the University of Washington as well as community colleges around the greater Seattle area. 
 
3.     Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change: ISAUW believes that implementing a ’Keraton Going Green’ effort will benefit us as well as the people who will be attending our event as it will show them how a substantial amount of waste will be produced in an event as big as ours. We hope that they will have a better perspective and understanding on the importance of minimizing waste and that there will be a behavior change in their lifestyle. We will also ensure this ‘Keraton Going Green’ effort will continue to be implemented in future ISAUW events and hope that other events that will take place in the University of Washington will also follow our efforts.
 
4.     Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability: ISAUW was established in 2001 and has since successfully promoted the Indonesian culture and values of diversity to Indonesian youth in the Greater Seattle Area. ISAUW has held multiple major events every year including but not limited to PERMIAS National Cup, LARIMAN (Seattle’s Amazing Race) and our signature event, Keraton. We strive to minimize our waste and environmental impact by actively adopting policies to achieve that goal. For instance, ISAUW regularly conducts fundraising by selling banana pudding. To minimize environmental impact, ISAUW opted to use attractive mason jars instead of plastic jars to encourage the customer to continue using them. We are confident that we will use CSF’s donation in a responsible manner. 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kevin Masman

Pairing UW Food Waste with Non-Profit Agencies in Need

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $22,234

Letter of Intent:

Summary

Our project proposes to pair-up UW food waste with local non-profit agencies in need through the design of an open source app. The app would facilitate the logistics and transportation of food waste from UW Food Services without having so many food products go to compost. This project could serve as a valuable learning opportunity for UW students, boost the sustainability rating of the UW, democratize the access to food waste for agencies who currently depend on Food Lifeline, giving the individual agencies information to act when they are in need. Furthermore, the project would create a national platform that other universities could lean on to reduce food waste around the country.

 

Environmental Impact

The UW prides itself on its commitment to sustainability. This project provides an opportunity for the UW to become a leader in food recovery programs in the U.S. Food waste is a major problem and contributes to overflowing landfills. The University of Washington feeds thousands of students, staff, and visitors, resulting in massive amounts of food that land in compost bins. While a few facilities on campus (e.g., the “eight,” located at McMahon, and the “District Market,”) partner with organizations like Food Lifeline to reduce their food waste, many UW facilities cannot connect with agencies in need. Food that cannot find its way to the dinner table due to a lack of organization, time, or money, is food that becomes wasted. While composting is a great alternative to the trash, it fails to feed those in need. Therefore, we propose a program that will enable all campus facilities to contribute their products to aid in the fight against food waste.

 

Student Leadership & Involvement

This project will be developed in a two-quarter Directed Research Group (DRG) in autumn 2017 and winter 2018 for ~ 15 students per quarter with students from two departments in the College of Engineering. The proposal team consists of student, Madison Holbrook, who is currently a Bachelor's student in the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) in the College of Engineering (CoE). She has over 10 years of personal experience working with organizations, farms, and restaurants in food production and distribution. With her combined UX and personal experience, her insights will help guide the team and focus the project. The teams also consists of Irini Spyridakis, a lecturer in HCDE, who has an MS degree and over 8 years teaching and supervising students in the CoE as well as experience working in the user centered design industry.

 

Educational Outreach & Behavioral Change

In the first quarter of the DRG, HCDE students will conduct a feasibility study to determine the frequency and amount of UW food waste and receiving agency capacity. Students will  interview stakeholders (e.g., Hub, McMahon, By George and U District Food Bank, NW Harvest, Food Lifeline). The information collected will culminate into data driven personas and a comprehensive report. The main users for the app will be UW Food Services and non-profit agencies. Their insights into food waste/donation practices will provide a platform that will set the stage for the second quarter DRG.

Next, students will design, create, iterate, and test the app, fostering UW and non-profit buy-in. The user-research team will create prototypes that will lead to a high-fidelity interactive prototype. The prototype will be utilized for user-testing and allow for validation and changes in the user interactions of the final app.

The team will develop and test the app that provides a platform for conversation and collaboration around food utilization. The final stage will be to present the app to the stakeholders and launch it.

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

We have been in contact with the following UW offices and people: the Business and Sustainability Manager for UW Dining with Housing & Food Services (Kara Carlson); the Public Health Program Manager with the office of Environment Health & Safety (Abbe Aberra); the Food Insecurity Specialist (Food pantry on campus) (Laurne Ternasaki) with the Division of Student Life; the Fleet Services Manager (George Donegan); and Transportation Services. Additionally, Madison has interviewed David Rey and Benton Litteneker, managers of the HUB and McMahon Food courts, respectively.

The app will allow the UW facilities to post what food waste is available that day for pickup with an alert system approach that will need to be user tested once we get to that stage. Non-profits such as the U-District Food Bank, Northwest Harvest, and Food Lifeline (to name a few) around the area will be notified of the available products, the quantity, and pick-up time. We will partner together using the app to coordinate, reserve, and collect food before it becomes waste.

With funding from the Campus Sustainability Fund and buy in from the UW, shelters, communities, and non-profits will be central to the success of the app. During the second quarter of the project, our user research team will connect with groups such as the following to try and find interested stakeholders with appropriate technical and people skills to keep the app in use. Possible entities include the following groups: Housing & Food Services, Division of Student Life, ASUW, UW Phi Sigma Rho Engineering Sorority, and UW Nutritional Sciences Program.

 

Budget Estimate

The feasibility and user research/design/development project will rely on hired student helpers at $11.50 an hour for 5 hours a week during the duration of the quarter. In addition, disposable food storage containers will be provided to UW Facilities for pick-up by Food Banks. During the coming months, we are hopeful that we can secure matching funds from external grants and in-kind support. We appreciate your consideration of this proposed budget.

 

Student Budgets (15 students spanning 20 weeks), $17,250.00

Validation Testing, $1,000.00

Disposable Food Containers:

Qty 100: Choice Full Size Foil Deep Steam Table Pan - 50/Case, $1,608.84

Qty 100: Choice Full Size Foil Steam Table Pan Lid - 50/Case, $2,376.00

 

Total, $22,234.84

 

Primary and Secondary Contacts

Primary Contact: Irini Spyridakis

Secondary Contact: Madison Holbrook

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Irini Spyridakis

UW-Solar Life Sciences Building Photovoltaic Implementation

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $150,000

Letter of Intent:

CSF LETTER OF INTENT:

UW LIFE SCIENCES BUILDING PHOTOVOLTAIC IMPLEMENTATION

 

  1. INTRODUCTION

UW-Solar is working with the University of Washington (UW) and project architects, Perkins+Will, on the construction of UW’s Life Sciences Building. The purpose of this letter is to request $150,000 for the installation of roof-top photovoltaic (PV) panels and building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) on the new Life Sciences Building.

 

2.    SUMMARY

 

2.1       UW-SOLAR SUMMARY

UW-Solar is an interdisciplinary team within the University of Washington’s Urban Infrastructure Laboratory that focuses on the development of solar installations with accompanying Industrial Control Systems on buildings on the UW campus. UW-Solar students range from undergraduate to the Ph.D. level within the Colleges of Engineering, Business, Built Environments, and Environmental Sciences. UW-Solar’s primary objective is to provide clean, sustainable power production to reduce the University of Washington’s reliance on external energy resources, improve power systems’ resilience to outages, and reduce the overall carbon footprint of the university. The usage of clean and renewable energy sources are a primary objective of the University of Washington’s Climate Action plan for the future sustainability of the University.

 

2.2       PROJECT SUMMARY

UW is working with Perkins+Will to construct the new Life Science Building. The implementation of a roof-top PV array will enhance the energy generation of the existing design, bringing the project closer to achieving LEED-NC Platinum certification. The identified potential for solar power generation on the new construction includes standard PV panels on the roof and BIPV on glass fins located on the southeast façade.

 

The BIPV addition is fully designed and slated for construction; however, the roof-top PV addition would be coordinated upon completion of building (scheduled for August 2018). This funding request is for the installation of both PV and BIPV systems. The proposal to CSF will include the complete installation and budget details for both systems.

 

3.    ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

The addition of photovoltaics to the Life Sciences Building will have a positive impact on the environment through the on-site production of renewable energy, which will both reduce the carbon-footprint of the building and increase its energy self-sufficiency.

 

The 120 BIPV fins on the southwest facade of the building provide up to 6,000 ft2 of south-east facing surface area for energy generation. Harnessing the potential energy output of this area could provide a significant source of renewable energy.

 

There is approximately 18,000 ft2 of available space for a PV installment on the roof penthouse, and an additional 2,300 ft2 of space on level 05. We propose a combined 100 kW PV system be installed on these surfaces.

 

4.    STUDENT LEADERSHIP & INVOLVEMENT

UW-Solar completed a feasibility study for this project and presented installation options and recommendations to Perkins+Will for implementation. This project has and will continue to allow students to work with industry experts and gain experience working on project development, design, and construction management in a professional setting.

 

5.    EDUCATION, OUTREACH, AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE

Research on the BIPV installation will directly affect future installations of BIPV around the state, as the University would be one of the first public institutions to implement this relatively new technology. A proposed Lucid dashboard in the lobby of the Life Sciences Building will show energy generated from both the BIPV and PV systems along with the energy use of the building. Visitors will be able to interact with the display to explore the building’s energy metrics and sustainable design features. The integrated PV panels on the southwest façade will be highly visible from Pacific Avenue. The unique aspects of this project make the new Life Sciences Building a leading example of sustainability in higher education and demonstrate the University’s commitment to investing in alternative energy sources.

 

6.    ACCOUNTABILITY

The feasibility study investigated ongoing accountability for management and maintenance of the solar installations, as well as long-term leadership considerations for the project as it relates to executive stakeholders, logistical management, and staffing and budget impacts of relevant stakeholder organizations.

 

7.    ESTIMATED BUDGET

 

                               BIPV Installation

$300,000

 Roof-top Installation

$300,000

Total

$600,000

 

We are exploring multiple funding opportunities to secure the full $600,000 needed for both installations. We are requesting $150,000 in funding from CSF, which will be instrumental in securing the additional $450,000 from matching grant programs such as the Department of Commerce Solar Grants, which awards funding equal to the initial seed money already secured.

In the event we are unable to acquire the full $600,000, the $150,000 awarded will be returned to CSF.

 

8.    CONTACT INFORMATION

 

Life Sciences Building Project Managers:

 

Project Manager - Alex Ratcliff, alexr529@uw.edu

Team Lead - Ian Rose, isr2@uw.edu

 

Facility Manager - Jan Whittington, janwhit@uw.edu

Urban Infrastructure Lab Manager - Stefanie Young, sy10@uw.edu

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Alexander Ratcliff

UW Bicycle Library: Cycle Pack

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $24,000

Letter of Intent:

For my senior project in Community Environment and Planning I have been researching how to increase cycling on and to the University of Washington campus. Through my preliminary research I looked into programs and services that the University and the City of Seattle currently offer the UW student. I discovered a gap in services provided to students who would consider commuting to campus by bike but lack access to one. There are (or were) two programs that offer student who do not own a bicycle access to one; Pronto Bicycle Share, and UWIld’s equipment rental.

Uwild offers students single day and weekend rentals at extremely low cost to students. Unfortunately UWild’s rental period makes the possibility of using their bicycles for commuting purposes impossible. Pronto is(was) aimed at providing hub to hub commuting services for short periods of time. This service targets users who live in close proximity to bicycle hubs and multimodal users who typically use bike share services to compliment another transportation mode. Unfortunately, due to the size and density of Pronto’s network of bicycle hubs, a majority of UW students are unable to use their services beyond cycling on campus.

Through my research I found that a bicycle library would be an appropriate solution to both provide users a bicycle for commuting purposes and to encourage users to invest in a bicycle at the end of the rental period. A bicycle library is an inexpensive or in some cases free, long term rental program. At other Universities, like the University of California, Santa Cruz Bike Lending Library, and University of Kentucky’s Wildcat Wheels, the bicycle rental period is typically over the duration of either a quarter or a semester. The purpose of this style of program is that it gives users an experience of bicycle ownership. The benefit of this experience is that users are given an ample time to explore how a bicycle can be used on a daily basis and how the bike can fit into their everyday life.

After discovering a program that could effectively target the user group I was concerned with, and impact future cycling use both at the University and through the rest of a user’s life, I redefined my project. My Senior Project is now to research, design, and implement and plan to bring a bicycle library to the University of Washington. At this point in my project, I am near the end of my research phase, in the midst of refining program features, and I have established a partnership with UWild in order to add the Bicycle Library to their current services. The final process I need to undergo is to achieve funding for the program through a CSF grant.

My point of contact with UWIld is the assistant director of the program, Matt Jensen. Through our conversations he has offered to house a fleet of bicycles (current capacity is 20 bicycles) and provide the administrative services of; maintaining the fleet, and facilitating the rental transactions. In addition to UWIld’s commitment to the program, I’m also attempting to work with EcoReps in order to, foster a consistent student presence in the program. Through an interview with Ted Sweeney, the active transportation specialist on campus I was advised that the biggest roadblock to a successful bicycle library program is student engagement. I hope that In partnering with EcoReps I can harbor a student body committed to the promotion of this sustainable project and can work to create a greater awareness of the program on campus. The final player I hope to incorporate into the program is the Office of Sustainability. I believe the office can provide additional administrative and financial support so that Uwild can focus primarily on logistical duties.

At this point in the project I am still working towards a refined cost analysis. In addition to the bicycle I still need to decide on the benefits of including certain accessories like bike racks, fenders, and locks. This week I am meeting with Ted and Matt to make final decisions concerning which accessories to include and what bike specifications are necessary. Next I plan to outreach to local bike manufactures/stores with the bicycle specifications we decide on and then partner with the bidder that gives us the best deal for our dollar. I’ve been advised by both Matt, and Ted, that for this program we should use bicycle from a single vendor. This ensures that the fleet will be recognizable, parts will be uniform (this allows us to buy in bulk, and ensures parts will be accessible when we need them), and it establishes a relationship with a seller which in turn reduces costs in the long run. In addition to purchasing the bikes and materials, I hope to also set up a fund for Uwild to use to purchase replacement parts and accessories for regular maintenance of the fleet and in the event of stolen bicycles.

I believe this project aligns with every element of the CSF’s goals. First, the environmental impact of cycling is a large component I addressed In my research. Cycling reduces the amount of cars on the road, doesn’t require environmentally intensive infrastructure, and contributes to higher density development, all of which reduces noise, air, and water pollution. Second, this project emphasizes a desire to foster student involvement through partnership with EcoReps and potentially other student run organizations like SAGE and the UW Bike Shop. Third, ultimately behavioral change is at the center of this program and an area I focused on heavily in my research. Giving users the experience of bicycle ownership is the best route to encouraging new users to cycle. EcoReps will also play a prominent role in advertising and educating students about the new service. Finally, through my research and outreach to organizations and departments I have created a sustainable partnership with Uwild and demonstrated my ability to obtain the technical knowledge to make educated decisions concerning this program.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Cole Laush

Biodegradable Pots - Replacing agricultural and horticultural plastics on campus

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $70,000

Letter of Intent:

Overview

                While University of Washington agriculture groups are among the greenest operations on campus, currently all horticulture and agriculture groups are using plastic pots for their needs. With the technology, expertise, and additional resources already available in the UW Paper and Bioresource Science Center, there is a clear opportunity for green, biodegradable pots to be produced on campus, thereby replacing all need for the purchase and disposal of thousands of plastic pots. Our ultimate goal is to provide the campus with sustainable alternatives to disposable plastics across campus groups, research facilities, and classrooms wherever possible.

Environmental Impact

                Current campus use: While groups across campus are currently washing and reusing their plastics, this can be water-intensive and often includes bleaching the pots, creating hazardous run-off. The energy and petroleum intensive production of these plastic nursery pots, as well as the potential for them to end up in landfill to consider. To combat the drawbacks of using petroleum-based plastics, this project proposes the most sustainable product possible for use across campus.

Proposed solution: The biodegradable pots will be planted directly into the soil leading to zero waste products at end-use. Additionally, pulp fiber pots will be cut with up to 60% brewers’ spent grain. This remedies a growing problem of wasted spent grain that has arrived with the popularity of breweries in Washington State. One of the most unique attributes of these pots is the application of a sustainable re-use for this grain that will provide nutrients back to the soil. Furthermore, the remaining structure will be molded of barley or wheat straw as an economically feasible raw-material.

Utilizing another waste product from the Paper and Bioresource Lab, fertilizer can be implemented via spraying a ‘black liquor’ solution on the inside of the pots. Using black liquor from already-existing sulfite pulping operations can add sulfur and lower pH to amend the soils, as well as aid the structural integrity of the pots. Black liquor is made of residual sugars, lignin and dissolved solids, thus adding only organic material back to the soil. In total, carbon from these waste materials and black liquor are sequestered from the biomass into the ground, resulting in a carbon-neutral process from our estimates.

Student Leadership and Involvement

                This project is overseen by a core of five Bioresource Science and Engineering juniors and seniors as well as students from the UW Society for Ecological Restoration (UW-SER), each specializing in different areas. With support from the UW Paper and Bioresource Lab, each member of the team has a specialty in analytics, chemical composition of the pots, machinery, molding technologies, or black liquor fertilizer implementation.

In addition, part of this grant covers a new molding system which can provide UW students a chance to apply classroom concepts in the lab, experiencing a production line from starting bio materials to end-product. This machinery can specifically be used for Bioresource Science and Engineering curriculum, providing students with hands-on experience with pilot-scale industry machinery.

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

                This interdisciplinary project currently involves a close partnership across majors and campus groups. Currently, our closest partnership is with UW’s Society for Ecological Restoration. By servicing UW SER alone, we will replace the need for approximately 500 seedling containers per year, among others. With the help of this grant we hope to replace thousands more across campus. Once this product can be produced to scale, we can provide our biodegradable pots to any group on campus who would be interested in cutting plastics use and fertilizer costs. Ultimately, our goal is to see all plastics use by agriculture and horticulture groups replaced by our products, adding another element to UW’s reputation as a green campus.

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

                This team of students is competent in their respective specialties, has experience in the Paper and Bioresource Labs as well as industry applicability. This team will be overseeing the full implementation of the project throughout, once these students graduate, new Bioresource Science and Engineering students will be fully equipped to continue production.

With the pilot-scale equipment, it will also be possible and necessary to create several molds and fertilizer options for various applications to eliminate all plastic pots on campus. Our proposed process for production is outlined in Figure 1 below.

 

Figure 1. Biodegradable products production, machine process

Budget Estimate

                While we have the technology, information, and research to begin production, the current methodology is primitive, and capital is needed to increase and streamline production to extend reach across campus. While we have extra tanks, pumps and other generics to put towards this endeavor, in total, we are requesting $90,000 to complete this project, the details of which are outlined below.

Fixed:

●     $60,000 automated mold equipment (online estimate), Figure 1 displays the main units considered in this cost.

●     $10,000 Infrastructure (piping, wiring)

●     $8,000-$10,000 molds for several pot sizes (designed in collaboration with UW SER)

●     $2,000 sprayer for  black liquor coating

Variable:

●     $2,000 start-up costs

●     $1,000-$3,000 chemicals - release agent, black liquor, shipping

●     $1,000 raw materials, shipping

●     $2,000 equipment spares (pumps, seals, extras)

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kaitlin Tighe

UW-Solar Life Sciences Building

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $7,500

Letter of Intent:

CSF LETTER OF INTENT: UW LIFE SCIENCES BUILDING PHOTOVOLTAIC IMPLEMENTATION

INTRODUCTION

UW-Solar would like to work with the University of Washington (UW) and project architects from Perkins+Will on the proposed construction of UW’s new Life Sciences Building. This letter is to request funding to perform a feasibility study for the implementation of roof-top photovoltaic (PV) panels, as well as building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) on the new Life Sciences Building.

SUMMARY

Within the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton’s Urban Infrastructure Laboratory, UW-Solar is an interdisciplinary team focused on the devel­op­ment of solar instal­la­tions with accom­pa­ny­ing Indus­trial Con­trol Sys­tems on build­ings at the UW cam­pus,. Ranging from the the undergraduate to the Ph.D. level, UW-Solar students come from the Colleges of Engineering, Business, Built Environments, and Environmental Sciences.  UW Solar’s primary objective is to pro­vide clean and sus­tain­able power pro­duc­tion in order to reduce reliance on out­side energy resources, improve the resilience of power sys­tems to out­ages and reduce the over­all car­bon foot­print of the uni­ver­sity. The usage of clean and renew­able energy sources are a pri­mary objec­tive, as stated in the Uni­ver­sity of Washington’s Cli­mate Action plan, for the future sus­tain­abil­ity of the University.

PROJECT SUMMARY

UW is working with architecture and design firm, Perkins+Will, to construct the new Life Science Building. The project is time sensitive as construction is scheduled to begin June 2016. The implementation of PV is supplementary to original building design and would help with LEED Certification. The identified potential for solar power generation on the new construction includes standard PV panels on the roof and BIPV on glass fins on the southeast façade. There is also potential for BIPV on ground-level railing around the greenhouse.

PV and BIPV addition to construction design must be coordinated within the next two months to align with the proposed construction schedule. An assessment of solar panel and laminate options is needed before full integration into construction design. This funding request is for the initial feasibility study, which will be presented directly by UW-Solar to Perkins+Will on December 16th. The follow-up proposal to CSF will included the full project proposal and budget for full implementation.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

The addition of photovoltaics to the Life Sciences Building will have a positive impact on the environment through the on-site production of renewable energy. This reduces the carbon-footprint of the building and increases energy self-sufficiency, which reduces energy costs while improv­ing capa­bil­i­ties for com­mu­nity ser­vice and rapid recov­ery dur­ing any future crises.

The 120 glass fins on the southwest facade of the building provide up to 6,000 ft2 of south-east facing surface area for BIPV implementation, with an additional 6,000 ft2  of north-west facing surface area. Harnessing the potential energy output of this area could provide a significant source of renewable energy.  

STUDENT LEADERSHIP & INVOLVEMENT

UW-Solar has the opportunity to lead this feasibility study and present options and recommendations to Perkins+Will for full implementation. This project will allow students to work with industry experts and gain experience in a professional setting, working on project development, design, and construction management.

EDUCATION, OUTREACH, AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE

This project has a high potential for education and outreach regarding sustainable energy. The integrated PV panels on the 120 glass fins on the Life Science Building facade will be highly visible facing outwards onto Pacific Avenue. The integrated PV option includes the opportunity for application of technology researched and developed at UW, as well as the opportunity for research regarding the performance of the system once implemented. The unique aspects of this project have the potential to make this a leading example of sustainability in higher education and will portray the University’s commitment to investing in alternative energy sources.

ACCOUNTABILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

The feasibility study will investigate ongoing accountability for management and maintenance of the solar installations as well as long-term leadership considerations for the project related to executive stakeholders, tactical and logistical management and integrated impacts to staff and budget of stakeholder organizations.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Facility Adviser - Jan Whittington, janwhit@uw.edu
Urban Infrastructure Lab Manager - Stefanie Young, sy10@uw.edu
Life Sciences Building Project Managers:

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Stefanie Young

UW Floating Wetlands Project

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $11,000

Letter of Intent:

Summary

 

Floating Wetlands at the UW will be a two-phase project with an end goal of constructing floating wetlands within a waterbody of the University of Washington.  This Letter of Intent is requesting funding for Phase I, a Feasibility Analysis investigating location possibilities, design prototypes, construction processes, permitting requirements and anticipated maintenance needs.  Phase II funding will be requested after completion of Phase I and would consist of the development of floating wetland construction documents, completion of permitting, construction and installation of the floating wetland platforms, and minimal maintenance. This request is for Phase I only.

 

Brief Explanation of the Floating Wetlands Project

 

Floating wetlands are an emerging green technology that mimic naturally occurring wetlands by using floating frames as a base upon which to grow native wetland plants.  The use of floating wetlands creates opportunities within compromised water bodies for environmental remediation.  Research and implementation on floating wetland structures has been conducted worldwide offering a body of information to support the benefits of this technology.  Such measured environmental impacts have been: carbon sequestration; fish, bird, and other habitat renewal; reduction in phosphorous, ammonia, nitrogen, heavy metals, and other aquatic pollutants; climate adaption and water temperature mitigation; and shoreline protection and beautification.    

 

Phase I of this project would continue work already begun by several Landscape Architecture graduate students working with the Green Futures Lab.  It would also expand outreach to students and faculty in a number of departments including: the College of Built Environments; Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences; Environmental Science and Forestry; and Engineering.  These departments would be consulted for proposed site assessment, design research, and permitting requirements.  At the recent Sustainable UW Festival, the GFL received a great amount of interest from students of different science departments looking for involvement in implementation of green technologies.  Many were interested in projects they could apply their expertise to and both Phase I and Phase II of the UW Floating Wetlands Project could provide that platform.  

 

In Phase II, students from across the university would again be invited to participate in detailed design, construction, installation and observation.  Although education and outreach for Phase I would primarily be internal to the UW design and science community, implementation of Phase II and beyond would allow for outreach to the public and greater UW student body through signage, publicity, and continued monitoring of the built floating wetlands.  Based on the success of a previous GFL CSF project - The Biodiversity Green Wall - students, faculty, and the surrounding communities are proud to see the UW at the forefront of innovative green technologies.  Floating Wetlands at UW would push the current implementation into new territory and build upon the region’s reputation for addressing polluted waterbodies, while also considering complex urban habitat needs.

 

Our current preferred locations for Floating Wetlands are along the Lake Union and Portage Bay shorelines, where migrating juvenile salmon need to seek refuge from predators in shallow water. Current permit requirements for floating structures in the Lake Washington watershed system limit the amount of overwater coverage, to reduce potential “ambush” habitat of predators. To address this condition, we have been developing initial designs that would create partially submerged planted structures, to provide refuge for juvenile salmonids in the shallow column of water and the vegetation above the floating wetland islands.  Initiating permitting conversations for these structures with UW, State and Federal agencies will take time but could open the way for widespread shoreline habitat improvement -- going beyond the paradigm of “do no harm” to “provide multiple benefits.”

 

Since this project is building upon research already begun in the Green Futures Lab, we have access to an existing body of information regarding design and implementation of floating wetlands on which to base this requested Feasibility Phase.  Outreach to floating wetland projects within Seattle has been initiated and can serve as a valuable resource with regard to scale and monitoring possibilities.  This includes King County’s installed floating wetland within Hicklin Lake in West Seattle, and on floating wetland structures built and monitored in a constructed wetland in Redmond, Washington by a Landscape Architecture student and former employee of the Green Futures Lab (who is now interning with King County to investigate floating wetland applications for stormwater treatment.) These existing projects and research in the Seattle area offer strong precedents for the successful customization of floating wetlands technology to the UW campus and Lake Washington basin. Through well-vetted investigation of potential UW sites and interdepartmental research collaboration, floating wetland technology could provide exciting improvements to the UW landscape.

 

Outcomes of Phase I will be:  1) identification and approval for placement of the structures on the UW campus; 2) proposed designs for the floating wetland structures;  3) budget estimates for the completed structures; 4) identification and solidification of partnerships for construction, maintenance and matching funds; and 5) an outline of permitting requirements, timelines and issues and initial submission of required permits.  Our aim would be to complete Phase II construction, and to then monitor the design and habitat performance using separate funding sources.

 

An estimate of the project’s budget

 

The Phase I of this project would operate with a total cost of $11,000.  This would allow the Green Futures Lab to hire 2 students at 225 hours each for an approximate cost of $9,000 over Winter and Spring terms, building on the extensive volunteer work that has already been accomplished. Familiarity with the floating wetlands constructed at Hicklin Lake and in Redmond has indicated that a materials budget of $1,600 would be suitable to develop and construct prototypes. We anticipate potential permitting fees and costs at $400.  

 
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kasia Keeley
Supplementary Documents:

Tribal Water Security Colloquium: Rethinking Our Relationship With Water

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $960

Letter of Intent:

Dear CSF Coordinator:
 
We are writing to request funding support from the Campus Sustainability Fund for a half-day class colloquium titled Rethinking Our Relationship With Water.  The Colloquium is a class project that aims to create a space to learn directly from those at the forefront of climate change and environmental challenges.  Thus, we are inviting influential speakers to talk about tribal water security (TWS) at UW’s wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ. In our class, we are broadly defining water security as issues pertaining to water quality, quantity, accessibility, and culture.

The Colloquium is schedule on March 8, 2016 in wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ from 12:45-5 pm.  This event will be open to UW campus and the public.  We will also invite tribal citizens from the surrounding area.  Invited speakers will share their perspectives and experiences on topics listed in Table 1.  In addition, students will present posters on a TWS topic.  Here is a draft of our schedule:

Table 1
Time (pm) Speaker Topic
1:00-1:25 Roger Fernandez (Lower Elwha Klallam) Storytelling and Native Teachings
1:30-1:55 Tony Sanchez (Nisqually) Importance of Reclaiming Medicine Springs
2:00-2:25 Micah McCarty (Makah) Ocean Acidification
2:30-2:55 Student Poster Presentations
3:00-3:25 Ed Johnstone (Quinault) Climate Change and Melting Glaciers
3:30-3:55 Terry Williams (Tulalip) Wetlands and Fish Hatchery Protection
4:00-4:25   Break
4:30-5:00 Bonnie Duran (Opelousas/Coushatta) CBPR and Environmental Research

Student Leadership & Involvement:  Undergraduate students in this class are integral to the planning of the Colloquium.  Table 2 shows the areas where student leadership was key.  For example, students have settled on a date, time range and general format.  In addition, students have selected speakers to invite and emailed out formal invitations.  During the colloquium, students will introduce speakers and present them with a gift, as well as communicate a topic they feel is interesting and/or important to water security.  Globally and nationally, TWS issues have not received the attention that is required to ensure safe water for all tribal members in the United States.  In this class, we aim to lead conversations that bring awareness to these issues and to provide an opportunity for our audiences to hear the voices of tribal leaders. 

Here is a timeline that shows the events and tasks we are carrying out.  The asterisks indicate specific “Leadership Responsibilities and Involvement” for each event and task. The class carried out tasks as a class, individual or by the instructor.

Table 2. Timeline
Month Events and Tasks
January Pick date *
Reserve venue ***
Find sponsorship *
Determine goals/objectives ***
Pick Speakers *
February Send invitations to Speakers **
Decide on title *
Brainstorm language for letter of intent*
Check on venue reservations ***
Finalize schedule/send information about location*
Pick a topic for poster presentations **
Create/distribute flyers *
Print materials ***
Solidify sponsorship *
  • AIS Department
  • Campus Sustainability Fund
  • 8th Generation
March Create menu *
March 8th Host Colloquium *
  • Set up food
  • Students introduce speakers
  • Student poster presentations
Send thank you notes *
Leadership and Involvement
* Class decision
** Carried out by individual student
*** Carried out by Instructor

Environmental Impact: The UW is known for their environmentally friendly goals.  Our project will add another dimension to these goals by highlighting water security challenges faced by tribes in the Pacific Northwest.  Our invited speakers are not scientists or academics, but are individuals who directly see and feel the impacts of these water issues and fight to project their families and communities.  As environmental stewards, they will share a different lens on these topics.  Furthermore, native communities are at the forefront of these dramatic changes and have solutions and experiences that can be a source of inspiration to people on UW campus and in the community. 

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change: One of the goals of this event is to raise awareness among the campus community.  Through this event, we can reach a larger audience and introduce them to water issues and solutions that can help address the water insecurity challenges expressed by Native leaders.  Additionally, as a class, we are an interdisciplinary group of students who are enrolled in the sciences, humanities and social sciences, and have picked speakers who are most appealing to our majors.  Therefore, our colloquium is an interdisciplinary collaboration across campus and with the Native community.  Lastly, this exchange of knowledge will allow us to learn directly from the source instead of only from books, papers and journals. Rarely do students have the time or opportunity for this to happen, so we are excited to be part of this event.

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability: Students in this class last year successfully carried out a Colloquium on Fish Consumption Standards in Washington State.  It was well attended and educational.  The schedule can be viewed here: http://claritalb.org/Water_Security_Colloquium_2015.pdf.

The funds we are requesting are for use from February – March 2016, therefore we are not including plans for subsequent years.  Our instructor has provided students with the guidance to ensure the completion, and success of this event.  In addition, we will keep track of all expenses with the help of the American Indian Studies Administrator, Marcia A Feinstein-Tobey.   

Budget request from CSF = $960.  Funds will be used to cover the following cost:

Table 3. 
Item Sponsor Cost
Food and beverages AIS $150
1 Speaker honorarium* AIS $100
5 Speaker honorarium CSF $500
6 Speaker gifts CSF $122
  8TH GEN $34
Rental space CSF $200
Promotional materials CSF $138
TOTAL   $1,244
CSF TOTAL   $960
* Each honorarium will help to cover travel expenses and compensation for our speakers

We will also request sponsorship from the American Indian Studies Department to help cover food.  In addition, we have secured sponsorship from 8th Generation, a local Native company. 
 
We appreciate the opportunity to submit our Letter of Intent for your review. Please feel free to contact us with questions or comments. Thank you very much for your time and consideration, we look forward to hearing from you.
 
Sincerely,

Lael Agee, Darby Bowen, Andres Coca, Supreet Ghumman, Teela Sablan, Alexander Sanjeev and Clarita Lefthand-Begay

Contact:
Clarita Lefthand-Begay, PHD
Clarita@uw.edu

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Clarita Lefthand-Begay

SER-UW Native Plant Nursery Improvements

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $78,051

Letter of Intent:

Project Title: SER-UW Nursery Improvements

 

Summary of project proposal:

The SER-UW Nursery has worked for the past year to expand our reach from a holding space for native species to a fully functioning native plant nursery, providing plants for student-run projects and increasing our capacity to be an educational hub for horticulture and botany on campus. We have had many successes over the last year including constructing a hoop house to expand our production capacity, hosting two public plant sales, and creating relationships and partnerships with on campus groups and classes.  Looking ahead, we are eager to perfect our system, increase our presence and partnerships on campus, and provide more native plants for student projects.

We provide plants for two classes on campus: Restoration of North American Ecosystems (ESRM 473) and Senior Restoration Capstone (ESRM 462-464). Collectively, we supply approximately one thousand native plants to these courses. Plants grown on campus by students are sold or given to student-based projects, increasing overall campus sustainability. We have developed a relationship with the UW Grounds team with the long term goal of fulfilling the majority of their native plant needs.

In order to meet our goals for next year, we see two areas for improvement that will increase the effectiveness of the Nursery: curriculum development and plant propagation expertise development. We would like to fund two Research Assistant (RA) positions which will allow us fill these gaps by providing tangible curriculum and results to be used in future years to create a more sustainable program. These two positions will create more opportunities to engage students and increase the amount of plants we provide to on-campus projects.

To better provide interactive and engaging horticulture-based education, we would like to fund a RA position to develop curriculum and activities that are tailored to this topic.  At the Nursery we host weekly work parties where students can learn how to propagate, transplant, and care for native species. By writing a formalized educational plan and curriculum, we can make these weekly opportunities more refined, structured, and effective for participating students. This position will also be responsible for facilitating work parties and engaging the UW community with this new curriculum, allowing students to increase their knowledge and skill set. Having an RA position focus on this will further the educational mission of the Nursery and help us to reach out to more students.

The second RA will be working on experimental design and implementation on plant propagation topics. Through experiments, this person will determine sustainable methods for fertilizing and irrigating the nursery plants, increasing our commitment to environmentally friendly practices. With these techniques in place, this RA will be able to successfully grow more plants to be used for student led and on-campus restoration projects, leading to a more sustainable campus and increased student involvement. Based on information gathered, this person would create a year long plant propagation and growth timeline for the Nursery with information on when and how to grow each species. The two RA positions are interconnected, with one providing curriculum and facilitation of horticulture activities for students on campus, while the second will develop methods of sustainably growing plants to be used for on-campus projects.

Environmental Impact

The SER-UW Nursery provides approximately one thousand plants to campus based projects, adding valuable biodiversity to our campus. Instead of plants being supplied by nurseries tens or hundreds of miles away, plants can be taken from the Nursery and used for campus projects, closing the loop on native plant production and installation. With the long-term goal of providing the majority of native plants on campus, we as a University could reduce our carbon footprint while increasing biodiversity and campus partnerships.

 

Student Leadership & Involvement

The SER-UW Nursery is an entirely student led project with 2-3 graduate students serving as Nursery Managers and two undergraduate interns per quarter. Graduate students manage and provide leadership to this nursery while interns build skills and experience in the environmental field. This core team works together to host weekly work parties that engage interested students in horticulture-based activities ranging from sowing seeds to salvaging native plants. Students of all backgrounds, majors, and interests can come experience this field.

 

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

The SER-UW Nursery strives to involve volunteers in every aspect of the work that we do.  We conduct weekly work parties where we prepare potting materials, plant native species, and salvage plants from lands designated for development.  Over the past year, we have connected with 236 volunteers, culminating in 866 volunteer hours. Our first RA position will write curriculum to provide consistent, intentional learning opportunities.  We will make the curriculum accessible to others, including UW teachers and students, other universities, and to other local environmental non-profits to further our outreach to the wider Seattle community.

 

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability:

The Nursery is dedicated to helping UW with its goals of sustainability and ecological accountability. Our second RA position will focus on streamlining our fertilization and irrigation systems to become a more sustainable program. Our promise to share our knowledge and curriculum with others will hold us accountable to our peers and partners.  The nursery’s overall mission is to be a source of native plants for UW students as they work on projects for classes and for research, providing a sustainable resource for them as they improve UW’s natural areas.

 

Project Team

Mary-Margaret Greene

mmgreene@uw.edu

 

Courtney Bobsin

cbobsin@uw.edu

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Mary-Margaret Greene

Putting the Green in Greenhouse Revision

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $34,635

Letter of Intent:

Letter of Intent Project Title: Putting the Green in Greenhouse, revised March, 2016

Estimated additional amount requested from CSF: $34,635

Summary of project proposal:

Original proposal summary:

The UW Botany Greenhouse was approved to construct an improvised rainwater collection system to route greenhouse roof rainwater to makeshift holding tanks under greenhouse benches. The collected water would then be utilized to water greenhouse plantings and decrease the Seattle City water needed to accomplish daily watering of plantings within the greenhouse. Shortly after funding was allocated the UW decided to move forward with construction of a new Life Sciences Building (LSB) on the site of the existing greenhouse and Plant Lab. Construction of the rainwater collection project was halted with no funds expended pending design considerations by the LSB building project.

Revised proposal incorporating rainwater collection into the design of the new LSB:

LSB design team contributed many hours of engineering and project time to careful consideration of various options for effectively including rainwater collection in LSB. Many technical difficulties were discussed and reviewed in light of previous UW experience with such systems. Most recently, a professional design was proposed that was very similar to original improvised design (figure 1, Option 2*). However, filtration difficulties and unreliable supply of rainwater during peak greenhouse watering summer months continued to give pause to decision makers. In addition, installation costs were quite high. As a result the design team was directed to look again for better options that could resolve the filtration and supply problems.

Improved design for greenhouse by redirecting RO/DI system reject water:

Capturing reject water from the LSB reverse osmosis/de-ionization system (RO/DI) would provide a year round reliable water source and solve problems of rainwater seasonal supply and roof water collection filtration. Contemporary science buildings routinely include RO/DI systems to “clean” tap water into pure water needed for today’s research. Although RO/DI systems are much more water efficient than historical water purification systems using boilers and water cooled condensers, RO/DI systems still waste 2 gallons per minute (gpm) in operation that goes directly to the sewer. The current design (figure 2) will utilize the RO/DI waste water to provide a year round, reliable and clean supply to the greenhouse fertilized water system to mitigate use of Seattle City water. In addition to reuse of waste water for irrigation, the uptake of irrigation water by the plants will decrease the water eventually going to the sewer by 50-75%. Simplification of the piping design and utilization of a smaller tank, given the reliable water supply, markedly decreased the cost of installation.

Environmental impact: 24 UW science buildings have RO/DI systems of which only one has marginal provision to redirect system waste water for other purposes in lieu of passing to sewer. LSB reuse of RO/DI will provide a new standard for current and future sciences building to design similar redirection of RO/DI waste water for conventional and more imaginative purposes, i.e., LSB will redirect to greenhouse irrigation which is a unique component of building design at UW. During operation of building RO/DI systems, 2gpm passes to the sewer system. In other words, calculated supply that would otherwise pass to the sewer is 800gpd, 24,000 gallons per month (gpm), 288,000 gallons per year (gpy). Intent of this project is to utilize the reject water for irrigation in the greenhouse. Comparison of reject and tap water samples verify the reject water is safe and acceptable for irrigation of plants.

Student Leadership and Involvement: The Life Science Building project now includes volunteer student participation through all remaining phases of design, construction, and commissioning to full operation. Essentially, student participants will have an on campus internship with an established engineering firm on an actual major project at a major university – significant on-the-job experience for anyone interested in engineering or installation of sustainability projects. Frankly, it’s very encouraging to hear the enthusiasm of the design team architects and engineers welcoming student participation for Putting the Green in Greenhouse.

Education, Outreach, and Behavior Change:

  • Education & outreach: see student involvement above; LSB project plans to include information on the main lobby media wall to educate visitors of sustainability measures included in the Life Sciences Building and highlight student involvement. Signage in the new greenhouse will describe the re-use of RO/DI reject water for plant care, and this sustainability effort will be highlighted in guided tours taken by thousands of people who visit the greenhouse each year. Many of the greenhouse visitors are K-12 students and their teachers as well as many undergraduates across the UW community who tour the greenhouse as part of their coursework.
  • Behavior change: use of RO/DI system reject water would be a new approach for UW building construction which would encourage similar designs in any new construction that included a RO/DI building system. 24 buildings on the Seattle campus have RO/DI systems now.

Feasibility, Accountability, and Sustainability: Much consideration has been given to approaches to lessen the impact of greenhouse water use for irrigation. A talented design team of architects, engineers, and building construction professionals have diligently investigated the best approach to move toward better water sustainability in the Life Sciences Building while remaining within project budget constraints. The current design provides the most responsible means for sustained mitigation of greenhouse water use for irrigation.

Project budget:

$35,000 Mechanical materials and equipment cost

$28,000 Mechanical labor cost

$7,000 Mechanical permits, drawings, management cost

$4,000 Electrical materials and equipment cost

$2,500 electrical labor cost

$1000 Electrical permit, drawings, management cost

$8,500 Management cost

Total above =                 $86,000 Total construction cost (sum of above line items)

Plus                                 $26,000 Project cost

Total 2 lines above = $112,000 Total cost to include in LSB design for construction (sum of two items above); in service July 2018

minus                             $77,365 amount of CSF grant for original concept

                                        $34,635 requested additional funds to complete “Putting the Green in Greenhouse”

Summary of key points:

1. Water supply revised to building RO/DI system reject water instead of roof rainwater:

  • Advantage of consistent, year round supply, especially in dry, warm weather months.
  • Advantage of clean source of water eliminating excessive filtration maintenance and ongoing costs for fliter replacements

2. Student involvement provides excellent resume and networking opportunity.

3. Project to be highlighted in guided tours taken by thousands of people who visit the greenhouse each year.  Many of the visitors are K-12 students and their teachers as well as many undergraduates across the UW community who tour the greenhouse for their coursework.

4. Construction costs are remarkably similar to original concept givne more workable design and construction

 

 

*costs shown on figure 1 are cost of construction only; compare to $86,000 for improved design using RO/DI reject water here

 

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Roert Goff

Planting and Installing Pollinator Habitats at the University of Washington Farm at the Center for Urban Horticulture

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

I am writing to state my intent to apply for a Campus Sustainability Fund grant in the Autumn of 2015 for the project: Planting and Installing Pollinator Habitats at the University of Washington Farm at the Center for Urban Horticulture. This project will contain several components. First, a 100 foot wildflower buffer zone, containing a variety of annual (and some perennial) species, will be mowed/tilled & resowed each year to provide additional nectar sources and habitat for native pollinators (in future years, this will fall under responsibility of the farm manager & interns). As well, I will design and plant a pollinator habitat composed of woody perennial plant species that will provide shelter, and most importantly, overwintering habitat for insects. Finally, I will design and build a rock garden and an insectary, constructed out of assorted lumber & other materials, to provide nesting sites for particular pollinators that require bare ground & woody material. 

 

By installing suitable habitat for local pollinating insects, this project will both enhance the biodiversity of the surrounding Union Bay Natural Area and benefit student food production at the UW Farm by potentially increasing the yield of vegetables grown and the genetic diversity (stress-tolerance) of the crops. Habitats will also provide a home for other, non-pollinating species that will benefit the farm such as parasitic wasps or flies that kill pest insects.

 

UW students that work and volunteer at the farm will have the opportunity to help plant the vegetation over the coming year.  They will learn how to care for the habitats into future years: replanting of annual flowering plants, trimming and maintenance of perennial shrubs, and removing weeds that grow into the area. Teens and young adults from Seattle Youth Garden Works will also be involved in the installation and future maintenance of the pollinator habitats. Any future work on the site will require minimal effort by volunteers; after the initial installation is completed the woody plants will be self-sustaining, and the wildflower buffer will only require one sowing from a pre-determined seed mix.

 

As a student in the Masters of Environmental Horticulture program, I will have support and guidance from professors in the program, particularly my advisor, Kern Ewing. This project is a collaboration with Sarah Geurkink, UW Farm manager, and Anthony Reyes, Seattle Youth Garden Works manager. I have knowledge of appropriate, native vegetation that will require the least amount of additional maintenance and ample resources (advisors, coursework, literature, and other local experts) to aid in implementing the project.

 

The estimated budget for this project is $1000. This will cover the cost of materials: woody perennial plants from the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER)-UW Nursery, seeds from local suppliers, and scrap lumber and other materials to build the insectary & rock garden. 

 

Breakdown of Budget Estimate:

$200 - Woody perennials (approx 50) at $3.50 - $4.50 per pot from SER's CUH Nursery

$200 - Lumber & rocks for bare ground nesting landscape (rocks from Marenakos' in Issaquah)

$600 - Seeds from local nurseries for 100ft x 8ft wildflower buffer just south of farm

 

Timeline Estimate:

Fall 2015 (late November and December) - Plant woody perennials in adjacent habitat area

Winter 2016 (January and February) - Construct rock garden & wooden bee structure

Spring 2016 (March) - Sow seeds for wildflower buffer

 

Thank you for your time!

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Nicolette Neumann

Next System Teach-In

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

Rethinking Prosperity is an initiative of the UW Center for Communication and Civic Engagement to identify and communicate economic models that work for more people, within planetary boundaries.  It emerged from a seminar of undergraduate seniors in Communication. Rethinking Prosperity, in partnership with the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies, is pleased to present the Next System Teach-in on April 25th, 2016 at Kane Hall. We are requesting $1,000 from the Campus Sustainability Fund to support this pivotal event to launch a campus conversation on how environmental goals can be achieved through an economic system with sustainability at its core.

 

The Teach-in is an acknowledgement that we are dependent on an unsustainable and polluting fossil fuel economy. Our governments and jobs rely on unrealistic expectations about economic growth driven by over-consumption. Most parties and politicians continue to promote failed economic models based on growth at any cost, while externalizing social and environmental burdens. Much of what passes for growth is unproductive speculation, leading to extravagant consumption by a wealthy few at the expense of a healthy environment for majorities in the global south and increasing numbers in the north. Due to the costs of this model, many societies now face the prospect of long-term natural resource deterioration. It is clear that the current system doesn’t work for the planet, nor does it support our efforts for a sustainable campus and UW community, and we need to work toward something better.

 

Unfortunately, sustainability is often interpreted to mean practices that are merely more environmentally sound than others, without regard to absolute ecological tipping points already underway. While vital to alleviating real, immediate issues, without changing the underlying structures and ideas driving environmental exploitation we will win some battles, yet ultimately losing the fight for a sustainable campus and a sustainable planet. In order to build a world that puts people, communities and the planet first, we need to imagine what’s possible. That’s what this teach-in is all about. We invite the Campus Sustainability Fund to help us build a learning community to create solutions and build support for an economic and political system that can restore compatibility with the environment.

 

The University of Washington Next System Teach-In is part of a nationwide call to action to increase collaboration among teachers, learners, and movements for systemic change.  Currently student groups and academic departments working at the level of systems change are off isolated, in silos. In hosting the Teach-In, our purpose is not just to bring students, alumni, faculty, and members of the broader community together, but also to catalyze a campus network on the themes of Rethinking Prosperity and the necessity to address the economic and political systems, which shape and constrain environmental behavior and impacts. Through this event and the connections that follow, students and student groups, faculty, and community partners working systems change for environmental outcomes will be able to more easily connect and build momentum and awareness.  Our specific goals for the teach-in are to:

  • Start a conversation about moving beyond the current political stalemate to envisioning a new future for our community and the planet.
  • Build a learning community for realigning the economy, environment, and democracy so that all three systems work better for people and the planet.
  • Dig deep and focus on generating ideas about the next system, and how to create environmental change.

Students, faculty, alumni and community partners will be represented on the panels at the Next System Teach-In, which is targeted at a campus audience. Students will lead the moderation of small group discussions that follow each panel. The discussion surrounding these critical questions will be recorded graphically during the event and shared with the campus community.  The panels and discussions will address questions that will expose students to new ideas about sustainable and environmentally conscious policy choice, such as:

  • How can the economy be equitable and environmentally sustainable?
  • What local solutions can become models in a global system?
  • What would real democracy look like?
  • Can capitalism be fixed?
  • How can we move beyond the “Economy vs. Environment” and “Democracy for the Few?”

We are partnering with a variety of departments on campus to make the event happen, including a broad range of RSOs—from the Foster School of Business’ Net Impact to the Association of Black Social Workers to the Radical Public Health organization—representing the diversity and interests of the UW student body.  We also received support from Political Science, Communication, History, Social Work, Geography, and Law, Societies & Justice.

 

Our hope is that the Next System Teach-in particularly the creation of the Rethinking Prosperity campus network will move the conversation about sustainability on campus, move student activism, and move the curriculum toward systemic issues of the environment, and in the end, help position students, faculty and staff to meet our sustainability goals.

 

The Next System Teach-in has received matching support from key departments. Support from the Campus Sustainability Fund is critical to ensuring the event has sufficient budget capacity to meet the needs of a successful event:

Expenses Amount CSF Request
Room Rental $864 $800
Food and Beverages $800  
Advertising + Materials $250  
Honorariums $250  
Graphic recording $300 $200
Total $2,450 $1,000

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Caterina Rost

Lab Glove Recycling

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $2,000

Letter of Intent:

Proposal

UW Sustainability and UW Recycling propose a pilot program from April 2016 to June 2016 (Spring Quarter) that would recycle used, non-hazardous nitrile lab gloves that are currently being sent to the landfill. The gloves would be collected by campus labs from the Molecular Engineering and the Materials Science & Engineering departments and then shipped back to their producer, Kimberly-Clark, where they would be recycled into products like park benches and chairs.

Environmental Impact

Labs account for over 20% of all space on campus. Used nitrile lab gloves are a significant source of waste produced in University labs across all departments. Recently, a waste audit conducted from 20 DEOHS labs determined that used nitrile gloves account for 20% of the volume and 22% of the weight of waste generated from the labs. That represents the second and third largest source of lab waste, respectively. Only compostable materials (primarily paper towels) were a larger source of waste by both measures.

In response to the waste audit, UW Recycling piloted a lab-specific paper towel composting program with much success, leaving gloves as one of the largest sources of non-hazardous lab waste on campus, if not the largest.

Recently, Kimberly-Clark developed technology that breaks down nitrile gloves into pellets that can be recycled into plastic products, like waste and recycling containers, park benches, and chairs. This pilot program would have a significant environmental impact by diverting gloves from the landfill and reusing them to make new products.

Student Leadership & Involvement

UW Sustainability’s Green Labs Intern will coordinate with UW Recycling, UW Sustainability, and participating labs to develop and implement the pilot. Our recycling processing partner will be Kimberly Clark. The student will also assist in developing educational and outreach components of the program, collecting and analyzing data regarding rate of glove collection and program cost, and organizing the before and after waste audits.

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

Outreach and education will target labs in the participating departments and will highlight the environmental benefits of recycling gloves. The program will educate, encourage, and promote the ease and benefits of diverting non-hazardous gloves from the landfill bin to a recycling bin. In addition, the program would educate lab users on which types of gloves are accepted for recycling (Kimberly-Clark brand only, nitrile, and non-hazardous)

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

Key internal and external stakeholders are aligned and ready to implement the lab glove recycling pilot. UW Sustainability has already reached out to labs in the Molecular Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering Departments. Lab Managers and building coordinators in both departments are excited and have agreed to participate. Kimberly-Clark’s RightCycle program has been going on for over 5 years. They have agreed to provide support in the form of best practices and are willing to connect us to other universities that have successfully implemented similar programs. In addition, UW Recycling has experience in a similar collection program for Styrofoam and has the operational expertise to ensure the program is a success.

Estimated Project Budget

We are requesting a budget of $2000, which will cover costs for shipping, signs, education, and trash sorting materials. The estimated cost to ship a pallet to Kimberly-Clark is between $400 and $600 each. We expect to ship two pallets over the course of the pilot.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Dalena Huynh
Supplementary Documents:

Kincaid Ravine Restoration Budget Amendment Proposal

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $35,000

Letter of Intent:

Since February of 2014 the UW Campus Sustainability Fund has substantially supported the restoration efforts in Kincaid Ravine.  The grant funding from CSF has primarily gone to pay for EarthCorps crew days (to perform restoration work), project materials and support for student project management and outreach.  Over the past year and a half Kincaid Ravine has been transformed from a neglected urban jungle of invasive species and trash to an amenity along the Burke-Gilman Trail as you enter campus.  While much has been accomplished already, longer term funding and stewardship is necessary to ensure that Kincaid Ravine continues its trajectory as a healthy urban forest full of biodiversity and opportunities for education and respite.  In order to achieve this goal, a budget amendment of $35,000 is being requested from CSF to continue funding restoration efforts through 2016.  Below are the major justifications and scope of work if awarded the amendment:

1) North Slope Invasive Removal – The north slope of Kincaid Ravine is the steepest and most inaccessible portion of Kincaid Ravine.  It is also the largest area still remaining covered in invasive species and not yet in active restoration (see attached map).  Since getting a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) on site boundaries signed by the UW last year we have discovered that the area available to restore in Kincaid Ravine is actually larger than first thought.  We have focused efforts in newly gained “territories” along the Burke-Gilman, but the north slope still needs a lot of attention and would not be successfully restored with current funding.  This amendment would fund a combination of manual, mechanical and chemical methods for invasive species removal that would minimize disturbance on steep slopes.  This would put the entire ravine into active restoration and allow for future access with trails, possibly connecting to the North Campus Halls.  Total Cost = $8,310.00

2) Conifer Tree Planting -  We have installed over 4,000 native plants in Kincaid Ravine over the past year and a half, but a primary goal of the project is to re-establish conifer canopy cover (which is completely missing).  In order to attain this goal more quickly and with better success rates we propose planting 500 larger stock (2-5 gallon) conifers in Kincaid Ravine.  Larger trees like these will be more likely to survive with minimal maintenance and will have a couple years head start in establishment over the one gallon pots which have mostly been planted (and budgeted for) so far.  Total Cost = 9,115.00

3) Site Maintenance – This will fund continued monitoring and invasive removal of regrowth throughout 2016.  It is hugely important to have funding for site maintenance in order to ensure the survival of plants that have been installed over the past two winters.  This will also include summer watering.  EarthCorps has already secured a grant for restoration maintenance from King Conservation District (KCD) and have already been using it for maintenance days as we navigate how to use the remaining CSF budget for EarthCorps work.  This amendment would provide necessary maintenance next year and allow EarthCorps to use the KCD maintenance funding through 2018.  Total Cost = $6,440.00

4) Surface Water Drainage Improvements – A major problem that still needs to be addressed at Kincaid Ravine is the flooding of the Burke-Gilman Trail.  We are in the process of finishing a report with two design options that would help alleviate flooding and enhance wetland hydrology and habitat.  This part of the amendment would fund materials and crew days to permanently fix these hydrology issues.  Total Cost = $2,770.00

5) Student Project Manager Stipends – The first two student project managers have received stipends of roughly $3,000 each for their work coordinating restoration efforts at Kincaid Ravine.  This funding has not been allocated for the current student project manager or any future project managers.  Project management includes coordination of many stakeholders with the UW, student groups, classes and non-profit project partners.  This includes hosting volunteer work parties, conducting outreach, managing budgets and planning for project sustainability in alignment with UW goals.  In order to compensate for these hours and to ensure buy-in from future project managers (which will be vital for long term project success) a stipend should be offered.  Total Cost = $5,800.00

Final Cost = $35,000

Notes:

The above costs do not include sales tax which would apply to items 1-4. 

Items 1-4 will go to a contract renewal with EarthCorps ($29,200 total) while request #5 ($5,800) would go into the general budget to pay for a current and future student project manager stipend of $3,000.   

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Dan Hintz
Supplementary Documents:

Fossil Fuel Divestment Pacific Northwest Network Spring 2016 Convergence

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

The convergence will take place over the weekend of March 4th – 6th, 2016 at the University of Washington Seattle campus. The proposed agenda for the weekend begins at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday and ends at 3:00 PM on Sunday. The projected attendance event would be about 50 students plus 10-20 trainers and speakers. This convergence is important because it will help student leaders learn essential skills that they need to confront the climate crisis, as well as build connections within the movement, supporting their campus campaigns and even extending after graduation.

The convergence will be oriented towards establishing three main goals: (1) developing core teams of divestment leaders at every campus in the Pacific Northwest that build strong relationships with each other and other campaigns, (2) establishing a common political framework and long-term vision for the network within which these teams will work, and (3) training leaders in skills including relational organizing and an understanding of power. We aim to use the convergence as a space to build the fossil fuel divestment movement, run trainings on climate justice, structural oppression, and the just transition framework, and launch reinvestment in the Northwest.

Our total budget for this event is $9,200 to cover the costs of facility permits, audio-visual equipment rentals, parking permits, honorarium/travel for trainers, food for the weekend, cooking supplies, training supplies, and travel scholarships for campuses. Our highest priority costs requested from Divestment Student Network, DSN, are honoraria for trainers. See below budget and timeline for more details.

We expect an attendance of roughly 50 students from campuses across the Pacific Northwest, including Montana, Oregon, British Columbia, Washington and Idaho. These will be students who are already involved in active divestment campaigns and have shown a sustained interest in becoming leaders in this work.

Requirements and Preferences:

Environmental Impact: Our RSO alone has successfully lobbied for over $30 million in clean energy investments, the incorporation of environmental and social governance (ESG) factors in UW’s investment approach, the creation of an RA to research ESG issues, shareholder engagement on climate change issues, and the university’s divestment from thermal coal. This convergence will spread knowledge and skills for similar action to the rest of the region. The universities in the DSN Northwest Region could have an estimated amount of $100s of millions invested in harmful fossil fuels. While this event would contribute to further divestment of the fossil fuel industry, the impact we would have would be larger than that of just the financial impact; as we are spreading facts and perspectives that will shift moral, cultural and financial norms to ones environmentally and socially just.

Student Leadership and Involvement: This convergence will involve students at the leadership level. Students from around the region and from the University of Washington will be coming together to develop strategies and confidence to become leaders at their campus, their community, and in the climate justice movement. Through conversing with fellow student leaders, being inspired by established climate activists, learning techniques, and by hearing the success stories from students and activists alike, students gain important leadership experience and bring that experience back to their campus to empower others. One of this event’s three purposes are to train students to become powerful leaders.

Education, Outreach, and Behavior Change: In addition to spreading the word to the University of Washington through RSO teach-ins, flyers, tabling, and in-class speeches, we have reached out to 16 other colleges and to the greater DSN community. This student outreach will bring around 50 students to this event to learn and develop. Community organizations Idle No More, Rising Tide, Climate Solutions, Race and Climate Justice Initiative are all speakers and trainers that will present their stories and trainings to educate students on the history and current status of the climate justice movement. These speakers, structured networking, workshops, and informational panels will introduce the divestment theory of power and change, a strong political analysis around just transition to reinvestment, tell a story of the unique intersectional status of the Northwest, of climate policy, and of the race and climate justice, and will include conversations on structural oppression and our power. Students will leave the event will new knowledge and perspectives that will encourage them to be aware and involved in their campus and community.

Feasibility, Accountability, and Sustainability: Confronting Climate Change has been an active RSO on the UW campus for three years. We have held a strong and stable relationship with the administration, students, faculty, and with the Treasury. Through these relationships, we work hard to have the students’ concerns heard, have collected a petition against investment in fossil fuels, and encouraged the University to divest from thermal coal, which they did in Spring of 2015. Along with this accountability, we are a part of and working closely with the DSN. This network is assisting us with the organizing and fundraising aspects of the convergence. This assistance comes with some accountability of its own. We have weekly calls with organizers at DSN to give updates on progress, to be held responsible for any tasks we needed to get done, and to receive guidance on how to have a successful convergence. The DSN has also provided us with a fiscal sponsor, Alliance for Global Justice. We provide this sponsor with detailed budgets, updates, and fundraising goals. Confronting Climate Change has shown accountability and feasibility through these relationships and organizational responsibilities. 

Budget:

Item Cost
Travel for trainers $2000
Honorarium fees for trainers $1000
Housing for trainers $1000
Scholarships for traveling cost/housing of attendees $1500
Food $2300
Facilities $1000
Assorted supplies  $400
  Total: $9200

Checkpoint Schedule

Our planning schedule is spread between several divisions, but this is a general outline of checkpoints in our process leading up to the convergence.

 

·      January 10th

o   First outreach to potential attendees

·      January 15th

o   Confirm speaker and trainer lineup

o   Begin grassroots fundraising

·      January 18th

o   Convergence weekend schedule draft

o   Weekend menu established

·      January 27th

o   Pay for plane tickets (attendee scholarships, trainers)

·      February 6th

o   Confirm housing options

o   2nd major grassroots push

·      February 10th

o   Food expenses paid

o   Registration deadline

·      February 20th

o   Final attendance confirmation

·      March 4-6

o   Convergence Weekend

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Ariana Winkler

Environmental Display for Paccar Hall

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $890

Letter of Intent:

Executive Summary

           

While built environments provide people and society with a lot of benefits, they also have significant influence on our environment. According to EPA, people in the United States spend more than 90% of their time in the built environments. However, many of them feel less engaged with buildings since they have limited access to the information and knowledge about the buildings such as how the air is heated within the buildings? Many studies show that this lack of engagement will influence how comfortable occupants feel and how much environmental awareness they have within buildings.

In order to increase engagement with buildings, we explored the potential of using visual arts to convey information in a creative way. During the internship last summer in UW Sustainability Office, we focused on Paccar Hall, one of the LEED certified buildings on the UW campus. The previous study has shown that students have limited information about how this green building saves resources. After reviewing diagrams and audit reports, I made infographics on Adobe Illustrators by visualizing its information in terms of water and electricity used in the building. We plan to print them out and exhibit inside the building in a creative way that allows students and faculty members to walk into the display and to learn about where the resource used in Paccar comes from and how the sustainable features contribute to its LEED certification.

Considering the size of the visual display, this project requires $700 for printing and buying freestanding boards. In the future, the boards can be reused for other displays.

            This project was complete under the help from Dr. Ostergren, my supervisor in UW Sustainability, and Brett D. Magnuson, a UW campus engineer. In January 2016, the Executive Committee of Foster School of Business approved the exhibition after I gave a presentation to them.

 

 

Funding Information

 

a.     Total amount requested: $890

b.     Budget breakdown:

-       Printing: $720 (six colored 2.5’x6’ panels)

-       Freestanding panels: $120 (8 large paperboards that use recycled paper)

-       Automatic people counter: $50

 

 

Environmental Impact

 

a.     Local context

The findings from previous online surveys show that students who have taken classes in Paccar Hall have relatively low level of knowledge about the building in terms of the built environment. Most of people do not even know that Paccar Hall is LEED Gold certified. Meanwhile, the surveys also show that the students who have more knowledge about the building tend to feel more engaged with Paccar Hall and to conserve the utilities within the building more often.

 

b.     How my project addresses the problem

The visual display is able to convey information in a more creative and effective way. After viewing the infographics online, 71% of the students chose a three or above indicating that they felt that they had learned. 66% chose a three or above indicating that they felt comfortable while viewing them.

 

c.     How the impacts will be measured

During the exhibition, the automatic people counter will record how many people enter into the exhibition. Meanwhile, I will stand next to the display in a regular basis and conduct surveys in order to see if students and faculty members feel more engaged with Paccar Hall based on their feedback.

 

 

Education and Outreach

 

a.     How will the UW community find out about my project?

The UW community will be able to view the visual display within Paccar Hall during the exhibition. At the same time, the display will be available online.

 

b.     How will the UW community become involved in and/or support my project

The UW community will be able to “interact” with the infographics as they walk into the exhibition and to provide with feedback. Based on their feedback, we will be able to create more effective environmental infographics in the future. Additionally, Foster School of Business will be able to promote their efforts in sustainability.

 

 

Student Involvement

 

a.     How will your project directly involve/affect UW students?

The UW students will be able to engage with the display and learn about the information about Paccar Hall. The project will potentially encourage their engagement with the building and promote sustainable awareness.

 

 

Accountability & Feasibility

 

a.     Timeline (dates flexible)

1.     Printing and assembling: 3/14 – 3/23

2.     Exhibition: 3/28-4/17

 

b.     Team

UW Sustainability Office, who provides me with guidance and support.

Foster School of Business, who approved the exhibition in Paccar Hall.

 

c.       Is your project “shovel-ready”?  

Yes. The infographics are completed. Foster School of Business approved the exhibition in Paccar Hall already.

 

Stakeholders

 

a.     Partner: UW Sustainability Office (Marilyn Ostergren), UW Facilities Service

b.     Approval: Foster School of Business already approved the exhibition for three weeks inside Paccar Hall. They will be able to show students and faculty that they put a lot of efforts on the built environment.

c.     UW Students and Faculty: They will learn more about Paccar Hall in terms of its utilities and resource by entering the exhibition and feel more engaged with the building.

            

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Eric Liang

Urban Forest Management Plan

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $63,760

Letter of Intent:

Define the campus environmental problem that you are attempting to solve:
There has not been a comprehensive assessment of the urban forest on the UW Seattle campus, and the Landscape Grounds Operations office does not have the resources to conduct one. Without the information that such an assessment would provide, the campus arborist and Landscape Grounds Operations team cannot effectively manage the tree collection. Problems resulting from the current lack of information include the following:
• Loss in tree diversity
• Inadequate protection and/or compensation for valuable trees lost to campus construction projects
• Inability to address all hazard trees before they fail
• Insufficient information for students who study campus trees
• Outdated public outreach materials related to the campus landscape
• Inefficient use of funds for piecemeal assessments that are inconsistently conducted for individual building projects

Describe your proposed solution to this problem:
1. Conduct a forest resources assessment. Hire a private contractor to assess condition (including hazard assessment), verify location, determine level of significance (according to UW rating system of extraordinary/exemplary/significant established by UW landscape architect, Kristine Kenney), and produce digital photographic records for every tree on campus. Sara Shores, campus arborist, has recently completed a tree inventory database with associated GIS mapping for all trees on campus. This inventory would be used as a guide and would considerably reduce the amount and cost of labor that would otherwise be necessary.
2. Develop a strategic plan for management of the UW urban forest. Use information obtained through the assessment to plan for increasing overall canopy cover, promoting safety, improving air and water quality, building diversity of species, and developing greater aesthetic and educational value.                      3. Create/Update educational outreach opportunities directly related to trees on campus. Develop student capstone projects surrounding the forest resources assessment and the development of the strategic plan. Update the Brockman Tree Tour by replacing signage with improved materials that allow for modifications such as tree growth, updated cultural references, and the addition or removal of trees from the tour. Develop web resources for public outreach that would include information and mapping for native trees, memorial trees, and extraordinary/exemplary/significant trees on campus.

What form and amount of student leadership will your project involve?                                                                                                               Professional leadership will rest primarily with staff, who will design and manage multiple opportunities for student involvement:

• Students can be directly involved by assisting with the forest resources assessment and the strategic plan – through capstone projects, internships for credit, or work study positions.
• Students in the College of Forest Resources are involved regularly in the
Brockman Tree Tour, both as tour guides and tour participants. Students could be involved in the updating of materials for this tour as well as the development of tour materials for the native trees, memorial trees, and extraordinary/exemplary/significant trees on campus.
What type and amount of outreach and education will your project involve?
• Students would have access to a data set that did not previously exist which could be used to research the contributions of the urban forest on the UW Seattle campus related to carbon sequestration, energy savings, and the mitigation of air pollution and stormwater management. The outreach resulting from such research would almost certainly involve public presentations locally and at professional conferences.
• The improved information would be useful for courses within the College of the Environment and the College of Built Environments, some of which focus on tree identification, landscape design, and landscape plant science and sustainable management.
• An improved website presence would provide public access to campus landscape information for students and members of the public with professional and personal interest in trees.
• Tours and tour brochures would provide an outreach opportunity to communicate the significance of the tree collection on the UW Seattle campus and the importance of preserving and protecting that collection. Students could conduct theses tours as part of their education.
 
What amount of funds do you anticipate your project will require from the CSF?
Hazard Tree Assessment-$20,000
Management Plan-6 month intern-$5,000
Condition/Location Rating-$20,000
Tree Designation-$1,000
Inventory Data Update-8 month intern-$12,960 Brockman Tree Tour -New signs, brochures, updated website $3,350 Fundraising Supplies -$300 Native Tree Tour Supplies and Brochures -$300 UW Tree Calendar-Photography Class? Photography and Supplies- $750 Memorial Tree Website Supplies- $100
TOTAL $ =63,760
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kristine Kenney

EcoReps Solar Table

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $21,931

Letter of Intent:

Energy consumption is a global issue, and on an innovative college campus like the University of Washington, students need to be exposed to alternative forms of energy in order to be the most successful of tomorrow’s leaders and thinkers. Conscious students are willing to alter their behaviors to reduce their energy consumption, but for the average individual, libraries and building don’t make it easy to be mindful of energy consuming behaviors. EcoReps, our student group, is working to implement a form of sustainable energy to benefit students by providing an educational and inspirational hub, along with adding a practical and health beneficial structure to campus. Our innovative solution to the issue of energy consumption is to install a number of solar charging tables on campus. Solar charging tables allow people to be outdoors, and to see the source of the energy they are utilizing. By seeing the source of power first hand, and reading signage posted at the tables, we hope to change student’s mindsets and to increase awareness and mindfulness of energy consumption, leading to behavioral changes across campus.

 

In addition to the physical and technical use of the tables, the goal of this project is to expose the University to solar power. Many people have heard of solar power but most likely associate it with large panels out in fields or on the top of buildings. By giving students the opportunity to interact with solar power in a convenient and useful way, we hope to change student behaviors for the better as well as increase solar power installations across campus.

 

ConnecTable™ solar charging tables have the ability to charge 75-150 devices a day, and store four days’ worth of charge. They can also function in overcast weather, a common occurrence in Seattle. The tables are light enough to be moved with a forklift and do not require grounding, so their location can be changed if necessary. The locations of these tables will target areas of high traffic and visibility. We picture a lawn full of students experiencing solar power first hand. Exposure to solar energy is an important step in increasing education, awareness and acceptance. One potential location is the Husky Union Building lawn, a central location on campus, where many students will have daily access to the tables.

 

The EcoReps team has started to work with the grounds and management team on campus to determine where placement of these tables is feasible. Our proposal included nine locations, of which we hoped to have one or two approved. We left the meeting pleased with approval for six out of the nine locations. With support from the Sustainability office and the Architects on campus we see great potential to expand the number of locations to every corner of campus.

 

The basis of EcoReps, a student organization, is to elicit behavioral changes on campus by project development. The University of Washington deeply values sustainability and is mindful of the impact our campus has on the environment. With many initiatives and projects on campus, little by little, we have worked to expose students to a way of living that can reduce waste, improve energy conservation, and educate those in the surrounding community. We hope that the presence of solar tables on campus will work to expose, educate, and change behaviors. 

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Paul Zuchowski, HUB Director

ASUW Student Food Cooperative Bulk Buying Storefront

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $2,500

Letter of Intent:

ASUW Student Food Cooperative Bulk Buying Storefront

The ASUW Student Food Cooperative (SFC) proposes a cooperatively run Bulk Buying Storefront, selling locally sourced, organic dried goods and cooking essentials. The Bulk Buying Storefront will be run out of the slightly refurbished HUB 131 kitchenette. We seek to promote sustainable living and eating practices here on the University of Washington campus by making bulk buying and bulk goods accessible to students, staff, and faculty. Bulk buying is a more sustainable way of eating because it requires less packaging, will be locally sourced (promoting our local economy and requiring less transportation), is organically produced, and encourages healthier eating. Buying in bulk is a much cheaper way to purchase high quality food products. Furthermore, the food co-op mission statement and core values will be fully upheld as we set about this endeavor. We will also fully uphold the mission statement and values of ASUW by actively benefiting, serving and engaging the student body. The Co-op will support the ‘storefront’ as a hub for health and food interests, both for its students and staff and the campus at large. The enterprise will provide healthy, sustainable, and affordable eating options while utilizing student participation and creating opportunities for collaboration, education, and leadership.

The ASUW SFC Bulk Buying Storefront will meet all four requirements and preferences of the CSF in the following ways. First, the SFC Storefront will reduce the University’s environmental impact. All aspects of bulk buying are more sustainable for our  planet. Bulk buying reduces waste, as purchasing food in bulk allows for fewer or even no packaging. Additionally, we intend to source our food from United Natural Foods Incorporated (UNFI) and Central Co-op, which are both local sources. Local food ensures shorter transportation trips, which reduces carbon emissions and energy use. Without a bulk-buying storefront, students are given limited options on campus. These options on campus are less sustainable as they have more packaging. If students do want to go to a bulk-buying store, they will have to go as far as PCC in Fremont (20 minute bus ride), Whole Foods in Roosevelt (15 minute bus ride), or QFC in Wallingford (20 minute bus ride). So the SFC Storefront will not just be a more convenient way to buy in bulk, but reduces the carbon footprint of the University by allowing students to purchase on campus, instead of driving or busing to a bulk goods store. Therefore bulk buying reduces waste and carbon emissions.

Second, having an SFC Storefront for bulk buying will allow for student involvement and leadership. The SFC storefront will be entirely staffed by volunteers/members of the university community and it anticipates recruiting a financial officer from the SFC or wider UW community. This will allow for student engagement opportunities.

Third, the SFC Storefront will serve as a powerful educational tool for students to learn about the power of collaboration and cooperatives, local food, sustainable practices, and responsibilities of maintaining a ‘storefront.’ Interest in food issues as it relates to urban agriculture, social and food justice, environmentalism, and alternative agrifood movements is a quickly building momentum on campus. Thus, by addressing popular food -related issues on campus, the cooperative can be a magnet for student, faculty and staff activity.

Four, the SFC Storefront project has been thoroughly researched for its feasibility, accountability, and sustainability. The SFC has already taken many necessary steps to create a cooperative storefront. These included but are not limited to: finding and securing a space, being inspected and approved by both Environmental Health and Safety and Risk Management, creating a thorough budget, surveying student opinion and feedback, and has also received support from the ASUW Board of Directors.

In conclusion, the SFC is confident that our project will meet the requirements and preferences of the CSF.

Finally, the SFC has outlined a budget for the SFC Storefront, which is outlined below.

Name Price QTY Subtotal
       
Dunnage Racks $35.00 3 $105.00
Sturdy, industry standard shelving      
       
Built Shelving $175.00 1 $175.00
Raw materials      
       
Dispensers $32.00 6 $192.00
1 gallon, portioned dispensers, 1/2 mounted on      
wall, 1/2 on counter      
       
Cambros $20.00 10 $200.00
Industry standard, sealed, food safe storage      
       
Scoops $10.00 10 $100.00
Plastic, industrial grade, food safe      
       
Non-latex gloves, scale, bags $250.00 1 $250.00
       
First Aid Kit $30.00 1 $30.00
       
Sanitation Supplies $200.00 1 $200.00
Food safe cleaner, sanitation solution, cleaner      
for storage bins, Chix brand rags (29 cents a      
piece) Spray bottles (restaurant supply store)      
2 buckets (restaurant supply store)      
       
Broom/dust bin $30.00 1 $30.00
       
HUB Signage $150.00 1 $150.00
       
Promotional Materials $300.00 1 $300.00
       

 

Subtotal        $1,732.00

 

This budget will be met within our own ASUW budget of $2500 for all non-food costs. However, we have outlined a prospective food budget, which we would need to be met by the CSF grant or other grants. Keep in mind that the items we purchase and the frequency of purchase is dependent upon student demand, and all prices estimates are subject to fluctuate.

            We plan on having six dispensers and 10 cambros for additional storage. The dispensers can fit about 6-8lbs of food each, and the cambros about 20-30 lbs. So if we ordered items in bulk of 25 lb each, we could have 10 separate items at one given time. 6 items would be in the dispensers. These 6 items would also have back up storage in 6 of the cambros, and the other 4 cambros could be used for the next items we could put in the dispensers. So when estimating prices, we used prices for items in bulk of $25 lbs.

            Additionally, we used the survey we sent out to gather which items are anticipated to be the most popular, and made a mock-up budget for 10 items. Estimating the frequency of purchase was also difficult, but we imagine it could be up to 2 times a quarter, if popular. See table below for food budget.

 

         
        $105.00
Item Price/lb Bulk amount Price Price for students (multiplied by lb amount)
Almonds $4/lb 30 lb $113 $4.6/lb=138
Pecans $9/lb 22 lb $200 $10.35/lb=227.7
 Walnuts $3.7/lb 25 lb $80 $4.3/lb=107.5
Rolled Oats $.8/lb 25 lb $20 $.92/lb=23
  Black Beans $.73/lb 25 lb $18 $.84/lb=21
 Brown rice

 

$.62/lb 25 lb $15 $.72/lb=18
Cannellini $.81/lb 25 lb $20 $.93/lb=23.25
Green Lentils $.78/lb 25 lb $19 $.897/lb=22.43
Chickpeas $.88/lb 25 lb $22 $1/lb=25
Cous Cous $.98/lb 22 lb $21 $1.13/lb-24.86
 

TOTAL

 

    Cost to us=$525  

Revenue=$630.74

 

 

            This $525 amount is simply an estimate, and depends on what items we buy and how often. If we bought these same 10 items in this amount 4 times next year, we would be spending $2100. So if we consider the variety of goods we could be purchasing and the frequency, we believe $2500 to be a fair estimate for a new storefront. We anticipate to use the CSF grant to get us started, as we await a budget approval within the ASUW.

We also would need to consider the fact that we would be charging students for these items, perhaps up to 15% of each item. This would give us just enough money to be sustainable while still maintaining affordable options for students. We also would consider a way to repay the CSF through a loan, over the period of a couple of years. This would be provided we made enough profit to self-sustain ourselves and once we have a budget from the ASUW.

            Finally, to address the possibility of partnering with the UW Farm, although we would love to have a permanent storefront serving Farm veggies, the guidelines of this project approved by EH &S requires only non-perishable dry goods.

We designate Student Activities and Associated Students of the University of Washington as our sponsoring department. 

Thank you for reading the ASUW SFC Bulk Buying Storefront Full Proposal. If you have any further questions, please refer to the following contacts.

Julia Partlow                                                                          Erica Weisman and Gunnar Colleen

Julia.partlow@gmail.com                                                      asuwsfc@uw.edu           

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Zoe Frumim

Electronic Waste Educational and Information System

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $6,500

Letter of Intent:

Hi, my name is William Zhou, I’m currently a junior at the University of Washington, and I’ve been working on an environmentally friendly, consumer-facing, software start up. Our start up consists of two additional students, a Math/EE major at UW and a Computer Science/Biology major at the University of Chicago.  Over the past few months we’ve developed a software called the EcoTab, an iOS software specialized for the iPad. Our product is essentially an educational tablet software designed to be mounted in front of waste containers. It tells a customer what is and isn't recyclable, compostable, or goes into the garbage based on what the venue or enterprise sells and provides. After a customer successfully navigates through the software, at the end it provides feedback on what their waste savings are based on their contribution (CO2, Energy and Space saved). We work personally with each client to index and determine where every item they provide belongs in the waste stream and weigh the items to determine what the environmental savings of properly disposing it are. 

1.     We feel that the key to success is providing educational knowledge to students and consumers on how to properly dispose of their waste. After discussing with UW Recycling and CSF memebers we feel as of currently, those needs are not being met, especially in regards to efforts of educating transplants and the educational community.

2.     This project is currently spearheaded by another student and me. We have done all the business development and created all of the software from scratch. We will continue to develop our relationship with HFS in order to bring this tool to the dorms, cafes, and restaurants on campus.

3.     Through using our software, we can empower students with the proper resources to accurately reduce our campus waste output and push towards a more sustainable waste quota.

4.     Currently working with HFS, we are approved to put our software up in several on campus facilities, including but not limited to McMahon 8, LocalPoint, Mercer Café, Start Up Hall, and the HUB. Our goal is to get out this pilot to see if students effectively engage with our waste information system.
Our cost breakdown:
6 x iPad Air 2: 6 * $550 = $3300
6 x iPad Kiosks: 6 * $330 = $1980
Estimated Installation costs: $500
Server costs and maintenance: $720

We are currently shooting for a one month pilot. If the pilot succeeds and aligns with HFS’s vision we will apply for a second round of hardware. HFS will then pick up the future server and maintenance costs. There is a lot of wiggle room and room for discussion regarding this letter of intent, so I look forward to discussing details moving forward.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: William Zhou

Earth Day 2016 Celebration

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $999

Letter of Intent:

Earth Club is requesting $999 from the CSF Small Projects Fund for the Earth Day 2016 Celebration. The purpose of Earth Day Celebration is to come together and celebrate the 46th Earth Day here on the University of Washington Seattle campus. It will create an opportunity for people throughout the entire campus including undergraduate, graduate and professional environmental active UW students to meet and network with local sustainability focused businesses and vendors, present their original work and come together to connect with campus environmental and sustainability groups, therefore contributing to a more sustainable campus. On April 22nd 2016, there will be an exhibitors fair for various environmental groups, the Husky Green Awards from the College of Environment and live music from Rainy Dawg Radio- all on Red Square from 10-3. 
·      

Brief explanation of how the project will meet the requirements and preferences of the CSF:
1. Environmental Impact
    

•    On Earth Day, the exhibitors fair and stage performances plan to attract more than 10,000 students and community members on campus who will find the opportunity to explore the environmental stewardship on campus and learn what they could do to contribute to reduce the school’s environmental impact. The groups tabling at our booths focus on specific environmental issues including reducing carbon emissions, effective usage of solar power, reducing pollutants and so on. Visitors will be able to help with signature gathering for certain groups as well as learn how to create a sustainable campus through small actions daily.


2. Student Leadership & Involvement
    

•    The Earth Day 2016 Celebration is primarily organized by student-oriented Earth Day planning committee and facilitated by UW Sustainability staff members. Coordinated by Earth Club members Lauren Rowe, James Bao, and Sierra Kross, the planning committee consists of around 8 student leaders from various environmental groups on campus, including Earth Club, SEED, and CSF. The leadership of the planning committee and generous help from UW Sustainability have played a crucial role in determining the trajectory of the Earth Day 2016 celebration.


3. Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change
    

•    Since the celebration is projected to attract more than 10,000 visitors, the exhibitors’ fair would essentially be an environmental educational outreach for the entire campus community. Visitors will be able to connect with various campus sustainability groups and thus increasing their awareness of the environment.


4. Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability:
    

•    The UW Sustainability staff members who have experiences of Earth Day celebrations planning are facilitating the planning process. They have helped our committee connect with the College of Environment, UW Recycling, HFS and other on-campus departments, as well as with acquiring permits and general logistics. Moreover, the students in the committee have already worked various environmental groups, which makes them equipped with leadership and project management skills that can contribute to the successful completion of the celebration. We have already obtained approval for using Red Square for April 22nd, permits for outside sustainable vendors giving out food on campus and so on. Our planning team is equipped with skills that will enable us to plan the celebration successfully.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: James Bao

Campus Illumination: An Implementation Strategy for Sustainable Exterior Lighting

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $75,000

Letter of Intent:

Overview

This project proposes a multi-disciplinary effort that will provide actionable guidelines to improve the energy efficiency and sustainability of campus-wide exterior lighting at the University of Washington (UW) Seattle Campus. The team will develop a palette of outdoor lighting strategies integrated with the Campus Landscape Framework “mosaic” as a roadmap for improved energy efficiency, perceived safety, wayfinding, and reduced maintenance. The primary project team includes faculty and students from the College of Built Environments, the UW Integrated Design Lab, the Office of the University Architect, and Seattle City Light’s Lighting Design Lab.

Lighting technology has rapidly evolved over the past decade, offering a wide array of new sources, controls, and design approaches. These include higher-quality LED light sources that deliver improved design flexibility with significantly lower power consumption and servicing needs. Advancements in digital controls and GIS technology offer the possibility of direct digital feedback, time of day control, and occupancy and event-driven control of luminaires that can enhance the campus experience while reducing its ecological footprint.

Using the “Campus Mosaic” as a typology, the project team will identify case study sites that represent a range of campus experiences, a mix of historic and new construction, and a diversity of landscape mosaic types. For each of these sites the project team will document current exterior lighting using four levels of analysis: (1) lighting design intent, (2) fixture and lamp typologies and GIS data verification, (3) lighting measurement at the site scale, and (4) integration with and transitions from other campus areas.

Following the documentation phase, the team will use site data to develop a comprehensive roadmap for campus exterior lighting that addresses energy performance targets, intent, illumination strategies, light sources, digital controls, and maintenance. This roadmap will contain (1) design guidelines for new projects and for the Campus Engineering Office to reference when upgrading existing fixtures, and (2) an implementation plan that prioritizes lighting projects in a phased approach for upgrade. These deliverables will be developed with input from the students and faculty at UW Center for Integrated Design, the Office of the University Architect, the Lighting Design Lab, Seattle City Light, and Campus Engineering and Operations.

Environmental Impact

This project aims to achieve, at minimum, a 40% reduction in lighting power consumption through the strategic implementation of low-energy lighting technology. Even deeper energy use reductions can be realized if these fixtures are coupled with digital sensing controls that actively respond to the presence or absence of occupants, or vary light levels in accordance with campus events. Additionally, such measures will offer added flexibility to operations staff.

This project will build off of the findings of a recent study conducted on the UW campus, which indicates that improved visibility and perception of safety can be realized at lower power densities by selecting light sources with spectral qualities that improve scotopic (night time) vision. Inneficient high-pressure sodium (HPS) fixtures currently constitute 63% of campus luminaires; replacing these fixtures with LEDs tuned to the needs of specific campus settings will result in a measurable reduction in campus energy consumption and offer much greater design flexibility.

Student Leadership & Involvement

With guidance from Seattle City Light’s Lighting Design Lab and in communication with the UW Office of the University Architect and Campus Engineering, graduate students in the Department of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and at the UW Integrated Design Lab will take leadership roles in administering the project, collecting and analyzing data, and developing and producing the project’s final deliverables.

ARCH 435: Principles and Practice of Environmental Lighting, a long-standing course open to undergraduate and graduate students, will be adapted to incorporate the project’s data collection phase and will serve as a laboratory for investigating and developing conceptual and technical approaches to campus lighting. This evening course is offered annually in autumn by faculty in the College of Built Environments who will also participate in the technical development of the project.

Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

This project will provide hands-on applied learning experience for students involved in all phases of the project. The UW campus will serve as a living laboratory, providing an arena for investigating environmental lighting within a specific spatial and temporal context.

In order to reach a broader audience, signage will be mounted on targeted outdoor light fixtures throughout campus. The signage will include graphics relating to outdoor lighting energy consumption, as well as the project team’s contact information. Students, staff, faculty, and visitors will be encouraged give feedback regarding their perceptions of current lighting conditions that will inform the future lighting guidelines.

Additionally, this project will serve as a catalyst for collaboration between various campus offices, moving the university toward a more integrated approach to campus sustainability. It will merge the efforts of the Office of the University Architect to improve the experiential qualities of campus, Campus Engineering and Operations’ work in updating, controlling, and maintaining campus lighting, and the UWPD’s objective of ensuring that campus users feels safe and secure. This project will develop a strategy that integrates all of these goals rather than addressing them as separate programs.

Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

The faculty lead for the project will be within the Integrated Design Lab, which performs research and provides technical assistance regarding high-performance built environments to project teams across the country. Additional expertise will be provided by an ongoing alliance with the Office of the University Architect, the Campus Engineering and Operations Office, Seattle City Light’s Lighting Design Lab, and UW Faculty from the College of Built Environments. Of paramount concern is that the  lighting guidelines and implementation plan align with the Campus Landscape Framework vision and are feasible and maintainable for Campus Engineering and Operations. The Lighting Design Lab will coordinate Seattle City Light utility incentive opportunities as they arise from project activities. 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kelly Douglas

2nd Annual UW Resilience Summit

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,250

Letter of Intent:

*LOI has already been submitted; experiencing Technical difficulties with the sumbission.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Grace Dahl

2016 UW Night Market

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

Since 2001, Taiwanese Student Association (TSA) has brought this dynamic of culture to the University of Washington campus, and it has quickly became an annual Seattle tradition. This year the 16th annual Night Market will be held on the evening of Saturday, May 14, 2016 at the University of Washington’s Red Square. Our goal is to bring people together in celebrating and appreciating Taiwanese culture. The event will include many vendors selling various Taiwanese foods, on-stage performances, as well as cultural activities. The Night Market attracts not only the UW students but the whole Washington community. Last year, over 6,500 people attended our event, and this year we hope to reach at least 7,000 people attending and to recreate the popular tourist event – Night Market.

 

Last year was the first year where we implemented a recycling program to help reduce waste. Beginning with pre-event planning,  day-of-event execution, to post-event evaluation, we hope the program can take our event beyond just recycling to hosting an environmentally friendly and sustainable event. With the funding we received from CSF last year, we were able to recruit more volunteers and were able to better educate our vendors and audiences. This year, we hope to further develop a well-planned recycling program to increase community awareness on maintaining a sustainable environment.  In order to successfully plan a recycling program, we not only need staffs but also financial support. The fund we request from CSF will cover the cost for ordering garbage/recycling bins, composting station, as well as any promotional/educational materials and staffs. The fund will  mainly be focusing on educating audiences of recycling and waste options during Night Market.

Here's three main approaches for education and informing:
1) Include recycle and waste categories in event brochure.
2) Label recycling and garbage receptacles with clear, large signs and instructions
3) A big map of the event lay-out that indicates location of composting station.

The second expanse will be spent on personnel:

1) Approach recycling team on campus --> provide them free food vouchers in compensate of their work and dedication. Cost of food will be covered by the fund.

2) Recruit volunteers for supervising. Volunteers will receive free Night Market T-shirts, where the fund will cover partial expanse of T-shirts.

 

One month prior to the event, Recycle coordinators will start recruiting volunteers. After the recruitment, we will organize information session  to inform volunteer their responsibilities on the day of event. The recycling coordinator will also work with vendors before and during the event. He/She will make initial contact with food vendors few months before the event to introduce the idea of recycling, and further ask for their cooperation on the day of event.

On the day of the event, there will be a central collection area for garbage and recycling where drop boxes or dumpsters are staged. Also, hand trucks, carts will be used to transport material from the recycling stations to the central collection area. After the event, materials will continued to be generated. Officers and volunteers will assist vendors with tearing down signs and confirming final sorting, and pick-up garbage and recycling.

 

Below is the budget breakdown for the program:

Recycling garbage service 292.50

Red square cleaning 415.91

Volunteer T-shirts 10*15 volenteers = 150

Vouchers for volunteers 10*15 volenteers = 150

Total Cost: 1008.41

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Emily Wan

Composting Toilet at the Center for Urban Horticulture

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $33,000

Letter of Intent:

The UW Student Farm at the Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH) would greatly benefit from the addition of a composting toilet system. The closest facilities are located in Merrill Hall, which is not convenient to access from the farm, especially on the weekends when the building is locked. The farm hosts approximately 45 service learners in the fall and spring seasons, as well as a large number of volunteers who come throughout the year. The UW Farm also has many regular events such as academic tours for classes, and social gatherings. Needless to say, the Farm site at CUH receives a high amount of foot traffic. In addition, a children’s garden is being developed on the site and field trips will be greatly hampered without facilities in close proximity to the farm. Installing a composting toilet system would be very practical to meet the UW Farm’s needs.

            Toilet flushing is a water intensive practice, regardless of whether they are high efficiency models or not.  A composting system does not rely on any water inputs and instead only requires the occasional addition of a renewable resource such as sawdust to absorb moisture. Having a composting toilet is a significant step in helping the farm create a closed loop system by increasing the amount of nutrient cycling done on site. We currently work to compost all the healthy plant material grown on the farm- the next step in nutrient cycling is composting all the waste created by those who do the growing. After proper treatment, the nutrient rich, but harmless, material created can be used to fertilize trees and/or ornamental species on the property.

              Installing a composting toilet lends itself to student involvement at the farm in many different avenues. First, there will be involvement with the planning and help with installation. A workshop would be an ideal way to get a lot of students involved at this stage. Secondly, more research needs to be done on the uses of human compost and the best location for the toilet at CUH.  This is a significant undertaking that will require continued student involvement after the installation to do such tasks as making sure the facility is adequately stocked, cleaned, and properly functioning. We currently have a large leadership board, which includes three compost coordinators, and we anticipate that managing care of this system will be one of their future responsibilities. In the past few years, the UW Farm has seen an increase in the number of students who choose to do research and/or undertake projects on the farm. Having a composting toilet would greatly increase the capacity for more students to get involved on the farm as it could attract students who had interests beyond sustainable food production. This will take a collaborative effort across disciplines, student organizations, and individuals with expertise.

            A significant area of student engagement with this project lies in the development of experiential educational opportunities. It will create chances to learn about topics such as sustainable development and nutrient cycling.  The UW Farm is an incredible arena for exploration and learning, primarily regarding sustainable food production. The addition of a composting toilet would greatly diversify and expand the discussions that could occur on the farm. As mentioned above, many classes come to the Farm to take educational tours, having a composting toilet as part of the tour would be a great way to increase awareness about water conservation and waste. The addition of a composting toilet to the site can also serve as an educational opportunity to the broader community and further UW’s commitment to sustainability.      

             The UW Arboretum is currently planning on installing a composting toilet system; they have shared the system that they are looking at installing with us and will work with us to determine how best to manage them. To support the longevity of this project, there is the farm manager and a core of three paid students interns yearly, as well as a significant group of students interested in seeing this project be carried out. After the installation of the system, upkeep is routine and does require adequate attention, but the farm is an established program with a continuous group of students and staff involved. Additionally, the Seattle Youth Garden Works who are also operational on the CUH Farm site have expressed interest in being involved with this project; as they would also be privy to use of the toilet they have expressed that they could provide support monetarily for the upkeep as well as assist with the planning, installation, and maintenance of the system.

            The UW Farm is requesting approximately $33,000 for the completion of the project. The current system that we are interested in is the M54 Trailhead model from the company Clivus Multrum. This is an advanced composting toilet system, which includes a solar powered panel to power ventilation fans, keeping the facility odorless. The structure and toilet are above ground, while the collection/processing tank sits 4 feet below ground. This amount represents a quote given by the company upon phone inquiry, it includes all shipping and installation as well and a 10% “buffer”, meaning that this is the absolute upper limit of cost. The figure above represents what it would cost to buy this unit and have it shipped pre-fabricated to Seattle; however it can also be purchased as a kit and installed on site. This would be a less expensive option upfront, but would not be desirable because assemblage is very challenging and technical. Therefore, outside consultants would likely have to be hired and thus costs would be equivalent of buying it pre-fabricated, if not more. Also it would significantly delay the date when the composting toilet could be opened for use. 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Sarah Geurkink

University of Washington Farm Greenhouse

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $22,310

Letter of Intent:

The University of Washington Farm, a registered student organization, would like to build a greenhouse at our Center for Urban Horticulture site on campus. We are partnering with the University of Washington Engineers Without Borders (EWB) chapter to find a greenhouse suitable for our site and set up a plan for building and installing the greenhouse. In order to build a greenhouse, we need to level the ground at the Center for Urban Horticulture site, run electricity to the greenhouse, and equip it with benches and supplies for spring and winter growing. Additionally we would like to build a low cost and energy-saving heating system that heats the plants from below by circulating hot water through the greenhouse benches. Furthermore, we need to buy seeds to plant in the greenhouse and hire an intern who will serve as a Greenhouse Manager for our first season of using the greenhouse.

We are currently renting a small space at the Center for Urban Horticulture greenhouse at a prohibitively high cost for only 2 months of the year. Building a greenhouse at the UW Farm will allow for a more flexible and productive planting plan, an extended growing season that includes winter months, and an increase in our yearly production. A large portion of crops grown at the University of Washington Farm is used by Cultivate, the District Market and various other HFS locations. Without a greenhouse, we have to almost completely shut down our growing during winter months, as harsh weather and frost make it very difficult to grow and harvest crops. Extending our growing season with a UW Farm Greenhouse will allow the Farm to provide locally and sustainably grown produce to dining halls, restaurants and grocery stores on campus for a larger majority of the school year. This quarter, 1937.58 pounds of produce from the UW Farm went to HFS and the UW medical center and 505.7 pounds of produce was donated to the University District Food Bank. These numbers will increase with a UW Farm greenhouse. The extended season of production will lessen the carbon footprint of the University of Washington community as more locally and sustainably grown produce would be available. The University of Washington currently hosts 46 students as service learners each quarter. Additionally, 12 students hold farm leadership positions and 3 students are enrolled in the farm internship class. We are confident that these numbers will increase over time. While the construction of the greenhouse will be directed by Engineering Without Borders students with their faculty mentors as advisors, a large majority of the farm leaders and some of the student volunteers will be involved regularly with building the greenhouse and developing a growing system.

The University of Washington farm is run primarily by volunteer labor; we only have one paid staff-member. Throughout fall quarter, work hours were held on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 1pm to 5pm, Tuesdays from 1 to 5pm and Thursdays from 9 to 11:30am, and every other Saturday from 9am to 2pm. Throughout spring quarter, a majority of these work hours will involve building and then planting and growing seedlings in the greenhouse. Volunteers and service learning students will learn hands on the benefits of a season extension and what goes into building, maintaining and working in a greenhouse. Furthermore, we plan to have a greenhouse intern for a full growing season following the completion of the greenhouse. Jennifer Reusink, a biology professor who teaches the farm internship class on campus, has agreed to oversee this intern. The intern would oversee construction, coordinate volunteering efforts, plan and implement a greenhouse planting schedule from spring through fall, maintain the greenhouse throughout the growing season and plan and implement a winter growing schedule. Students will be actively involved in most of the aspects of building and working in the greenhouse and build further connections between people, our land, and our future since food is so intimately linked in all those aspects of life.

The University of Washington Farm is extremely committed to carrying out and following through on our plans to build and maintain the greenhouse at the UW Farm. We have 7 Engineering Without Borders students committed to setting a plan for building the greenhouse and seeing it through under the advising of Peter Sturtevant, a Senior Civil Engineer with CH2M Hill, and Professor Mark Benjamin, a professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington. The engineering students plan to begin work in early spring and complete the greenhouse project through a series of approximately six work parties, with help from University of Washington Farm students and volunteers.

We are requesting $22,602.72 for this project. We plan to build the greenhouse from a kit and add our own end frame augmentation. We will need $4,216.94 for supplies to build the greenhouse; $3,355 for greenhouse kit and $286.58 for the baseboards for the building foundation and $300 for pipe connections and miscellaneous tools and materials. Additionally, we will need $822.67 to build benches for planting in the greenhouse; $633.60 for bench wood and $189.07 for hardware cloth. We will need $5,172.13 to build a heating system; $2,056.37 for the pump/boiler integrator, $724.47 for a boiler, and $122.59 for pipes and pipe insulation. Additionally, we will need $1,030.10 for additional materials to augment the end frame and $133.18 for additional construction materials like screws and nails. We will need $4,731.70 to buy tools to use in the greenhouse; $39.50 for seed spoons (10 x $3.95 each), $3,950 for seed tappers (10 x $395), $358 for soil block makers (2 x $179) and $384.20 for bread trays for putting the soil blocks on (20 x $19.21). We are also requesting $6,496 to fund a greenhouse intern for the winter, spring and summer quarters following the building of the greenhouse. We need $1,160 ($10/hour for 10 hours/week) for spring quarter, $4,176 ($10/hour for 30 hours/week) for summer quarter and $1,160 ($10/hour for 10 hours/week). Finally, we need $500 to buy seeds for the greenhouse.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Sarah Geurkink

Sustainable Stormwater Coordinator Phase 2

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $9,051

Letter of Intent:

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Sustainable Stormwater Coordinator (SSC) position designates a SEFS research aide appointment to spread awareness about and physically improve stormwater treatment on campus. This is accomplished by investigating the current quantity and quality of campus stormwater, analyzing a suite of suitable water management tools, and building a collaborative student-faculty-administration approach to this pressing issue. In sum, continuation of this project seeks concrete and actionable runoff strategies, informed by water quality testing of discharges from parking lots, rooftops and sports fields.

Responsibilities include:

·         Conduct outreach and education to students and faculty about stormwater issues

·         Engage and support students and departments pursuing stormwater related projects, such as rain gardens, bioswales, smart irrigation and water recycling

·         Sample stormwater on campus for oil + grease and metals in order to determine pollution hotspots

·         Support Salmon Safe recertification

·         Identify stormwater rebates or stormwater project funding possibilities

Presently, the SSC has made significant progress in advancing the responsible handling of our fresh water resource at UW as each of the supported projects/endeavors has benefited from assistance with some or all of the following roles/responsibilities: funding identification, program development, design, materials acquisition, water quality testing, documentation, facilitation of permitting, facilitation of contracted consultations, site visits, and facilitation of administrative collaboration for the following projects/endeavors:

·         Development of UW Seattle campus Stormwater Sampling Plan

·         Prairie Rain Garden

·         Kincaid Ravine Hydrology Improvements

·         Kincaid Ravine Memorandum of Agreement (stream and wetland protections)

·         Water Recycling System for Society for Ecological Restoration-UW Hoophouse

·         Development of campus-wide Curb Cut plan

·         UW-Seattle Stormwater Resource Guide

·         Identification of Surface Water Management Rebates and Stormwater Project Funding

·         Salmon Safe (SS) Recertification, SS Student Awareness Campaign and SS certification of UW Farm

·         Sustainable Stormwater resource drive and list serve news updates 

Despite this progress in establishing a baseline of momentum, the importance of continuing the SSC position is urgent. Funding from other sources has not been secured and the potential discontinuation of this position would hamper progress and threaten follow-through on many of the projects listed above. The position has increased visibility and awareness of the CSF by connecting promising student led projects to the CSF. In so doing, a strong network of projects has an aggregate effect of success. These projects are all linked and supportive of one another, leading to a tight knit web of sustainability.

The SSC position is overseen by hydrology Professor Susan Bolton and the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. It consults with campus Environmental Engineer David Ogrodnik, Engineer James Morin, Landscape Architect Kristine Kenney, Environmental and Land Use Compliance Officer Jan Arntz, and Grounds Manager Howard Nakase.

 

ENVIRONMENT

A total of 27,000 gallons of stormwater are produced as runoff from a one-acre parking lot, after one inch of rain. In UW parking lots, stormwater picks up oil, grease, metals and coolants from vehicles, and it proceeds largely untreated into Portage Bay and Lake Washington. Other impervious surfaces, like roofs, compound the quantity of overland runoff and inhibit on-site infiltration.

 

STUDENT LEADERSHIP

The SSC is envisioned as a permanent position that provides a forum for students to develop the skill set and knowledge base to pursue projects related to water use and waste, including exposure to important local organizations and partnership opportunities in the Seattle restoration community. A multi-disciplinary core group of students, which meets in various contexts throughout each academic quarter, provides support to the SSC, including communication and networking, outreach and education, and assistance in water and soil testing.

                 The core student group has identified ‘Continued Accountability’ as a primary objective, and envisioned the student SSC position through SEFS. Department administrator Wendy Star serves as budget administrator for the SCC project. The creation of this position has the written support of HSS, 12,000 Rain Gardens, Puget Soundkeeper, SER-UW, the Kincaid Ravine Restoration team and Salmon Safe. Letters from supporters will be included in the CSF proposal.

 

OUTREACH

Outreach via social media outlets and a blog will have a key place in communicating this project to the student body. Integration into classes for University credit through SEFS and graduate projects for the Masters in Environmental Horticulture have begun but need more time to fully develop.

The ongoing SSC position helps to coordinate student stormwater efforts over the long-term, channel communication between students and admin through one informed and capable liaison, and collaborate with off-campus entities to establish UW’s leadership in the greater stormwater community.

By having this stormwater point person, combined with regular meetings, water projects around campus will begin to unite, heighten impact through symbiosis, and share information and resources.  With parking lot redesigns throughout campus, the SSC channels student voices of water related considerations to the appropriate administrators.

Educational signage has been funded for Kincaid Ravine and will describe Hydrology features, as well as recognize project partners like CSF, with a representative logo. Signage for Prairie Rain Garden and SER-UW Nursery, likewise describing hydrology features and acknowledging the CSF, are in the process of development.

 

ACCOUNTABILITY

Salmon Safe has endorsed the SSC to assist UW in meeting the Salmon Safe Certification standards.The SSC will work to generate an ongoing commitment of political will towards progressive stormwater policy and true environmental stewardship. 

Financially, the SSC will research fee-reduction for stormwater treatments (North Seattle Community College saves $60,000+ in annual stormwater fees, the direct result of a campus-wide collaboration where students applied for tax credits through Seattle Public Utilities). Since UW spends ~$1.3 million in annual stormwater fees, economic incentive is clearly justified.

9 months of CSF funding will serve to solidify this position. SEFS will support SSC with ongoing funding options once position is established. Alternate funding has not been secured and one more academic year of CSF funding will provide ample time to identify and diversify funding sources.

 

BUDGET

16,102 Total

15,102 -Student Project Management

(figure based on $1678 Schedule A RA position x 9 months)

1000- Water sample analysis

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Matthew Schwartz

Yesler Swamp Trek Stop

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $65,000

Letter of Intent:

Our team is proposing a $65,000 construction project on the western shoreline of the Yesler Swamp lagoon to offer UW students and other visitors a unique wildlife observation platform.  The viewing platform will be called the “Yesler Swamp Trek Stop” (YSTS) and will offer a permanent birdwatching post to rest, reflect, and interact with the different species that reside in riparian ecosystems around Lake Washington.  This project fits very well into our project team’s academic goals because we are students committed to environmental sustainability and restoration.  Our team has been hosting volunteer restoration events and documenting them on this website (yeslerswamp.weebly.com) since October of 2013.
 
The main outcomes and goals of this project are:

  • Build a bird blind structure with an extremely low environmental footprint that adheres to green building specifications.
  • Provide a unique and identifying landmark for the Yesler Swamp.
  • Provide an avenue for the public to engage with the swamp and its biodiversity through interpretive signs and educational/sustainable design elements.
  • Provide an exceptional view of the swamp lagoon, Lake Washington, and Mt. Rainier.
  • Provide an outdoor classroom for groups visiting the UW Center for Urban Horticulture.
  • Build a stronger connection between the Yesler Swamp and the well established Union Bay Natural Area (UBNA).
  • Raise awareness about the Yesler Swamp and the opportunities it presents for students and the greater Seattle community to engage with nature--not only passively, but actively.

 
The success of our project will be measured by:
Number of volunteers (both students and others), number of visitors to the YSTS, Sustainability Score Rating, and Green Building Specifications.
These measurements will be tracked through sign-in sheets at work events and a permanent sign-in sheet at the viewing platform for guests to write on.  The sustainability score will be assessed during the projects design/build phase and during the construction phase.  
 
Background Story:
The Yesler Swamp is slowly transforming from a neglected and degraded wasteland into a restored green space and prospering ecosystem in the heart of Seattle. Once home to Henry Yesler’s timber mill and later a garbage dump; the Yesler Swamp is now an environmental treasure in Seattle.  It provides a sanctuary where people can trade in the cacophony of urban life for the tittering of hundreds of birds; an urban oasis where people both young and old can be fascinated by the natural world.
The Yesler Swamp Trek Stop will border the western edge of the swamp and the eastern end of the UW Center for Urban Horticulture, south east of the botany greenhouses.  There will also be a wooden boardwalk twenty yards away, providing a permanent loop trail through the swamp.  The nonprofit organization, The Friends of Yesler Swamp, has raised enough funds to construct the first phase of the boardwalk adjacent to the proposed location for the trek stop.  Upon completion, this boardwalk will be donated to the UW.  Our team’s collaboration with the Friends of Yesler Swamp and their boardwalk endeavor will help establish the Yesler Swamp as an attractive destination for UW students and the surrounding neighborhoods.  UW students have been restoring the swamp every year since 2000, which demonstrates that the site holds a place in students’ hearts. Our project team also has strong history of educational tours and events at the Yesler Swamp that we consistently document on our website: yeslerswamp.weebly.com.  
 
Our proposed project meets the requirements and preferences of the CSF in the following ways:
 
Environmental Impact
 
Upon completion, the YSTS will mix environmental and long term sustainable design elements. In doing so, the YSTS will be easily maintained and blend in with the surrounding environment.  We plan to build the YSTS out of reclaimed materials from a local vendor to lessen the University’s environmental impact. Possible businesses include Second Use Building Materials and Salvage, and the RE Store. These establishments salvage reusable materials from buildings that are going to be demolished and offer discounts to community projects.  Beyond the physical building of the observation station, this project creates a more sustainable campus because it gives people a way to invest in and enhance their appreciation for the natural world.  We hope to expand the possibilities for students to encounter wildlife at the UW campus, while simultaneously demonstrating the importance of the Yesler Swamp and its preservation.
Student Leadership and Involvement
Our project will incorporate student leadership and involvement during the design and construction phases through collaboration with the faculty and students in the College of Built Environments. One specific class we are considering working with is a design-build class taught by Steve Badanes to mix environmental and long term sustainable design elements. Ideally, our team would like to work with architecture and/or landscape architecture students to come up with a sustainable, ecological, and innovative shoreline viewing station.  We intend to involve talented students who care about environmental stewardship and advancing campus infrastructure.  As the project progresses from the design phase and into the construction implementation phase, we will incorporate a larger array of students who have the necessary skills and expertise. This project will cultivate an aware and engaged campus community because students involved in the process will feel a sense of ownership and pride in the swamp.  In addition, it will create future opportunities for students to engage with the natural landscape surrounding the UW.  
Education, Outreach, and Behavior for building the YSTS is to foster an environmentally conscious culture. In the beginning, our main goal will be to enlighten the student body about the various ecosystems that inhabit the land. This will take the form of posting fliers all around Seattle and holding informational sessions about volunteer opportunities on campus, at local high schools, and community colleges.  We also want to engage our classmates by participating in UW events such as Dawg Dayz, Martin Luther King Day, and Earth Day.  
Our project team will seek input from everybody who is passionate about sustainable design and wants to be involved in the development of the YSTS.  The other component of cultivating awareness involves our local community. By canvassing local neighborhoods and publishing an article in the local paper, we want to bring awareness to the weekly work parties that the Community, Environment, and Planning Program and the Friends of Yesler Swamp are currently hosting, and encourage Seattle residents to be actively engaged in the Yesler Swamp restoration process.  This financial investment will foster environmental stewardship for future generations.
Feasibility, Accountability, and Sustainability
The YSTS will be durable by design and require minimal maintenance to ensure its long term sustainability.  Additional facilities and grounds maintenance will be conducted by the Friends of Yesler Swamp and the work crews responsible for the boardwalk trail system through a matching funds program.  Fred Hoyt of the UW Center for Urban Horticulture fully supports the YSTS and has requested that we include and update him throughout this entire grant proposal process.  Both Fred Hoyt and the Friends of Yesler Swamp will be assisting our grant writing team with technical and experiential knowledge.  We’ve listed our anticipated stakeholder groups and partners below:
Expected Project Stakeholder(s) Include:
Fred Hoyt: Associate Director of UW Botanic Gardens.
 
Environmental Science and Resource Management Department at UW: Professors who might be interested in using the observation station for their research and/or class visits.
 
College of Built Environments at UW: Faculty and students who are willing to help design and construct the observation station.  Our current plan is to contact Steve Badanes about facilitating a design/build workshop for the YSTS.
 
Friends of Yesler Swamp Non-profit: Team members Tyler and Carolyn have a well established relationship with this organization as active board members.  Their mentorship is crucial to us because of their professional experience and their success with the boardwalk project.
 
Anna Stock, Property Rights Manager in the UW Real Estate office: To integrate the Yesler Swamp boardwalk project and the YSTS into one cohesive real estate asset to the University.
 
Kristine Kenney, University Landscape Architect: To collaborate on how the YSTS can contribute to the landscaping goals of the University.
 
Amy Van Dyke, Director, Physical Planning & Space Management at the Bothell Campus (Sarah Simonds Green Conservatory): To discuss the similarities between the UW Bothell wetland conservatory and the Yesler Swamp.  
 
Department of Planning and Development: To approve the wetland and building permits necessary to start construction at the swamp.
 
Martha Moritz: Primary contact for the Kincaid Ravine Restoration Project, an approved CSF project that has similar goals to our proposed project.
Expected Project Budget:
Anticipated Budget: Total Cost = $65,000

  1. Materials, labor, and maintenance expenses = $50,000
    1. (Site preparation and restoration): (Erosion and sediment control): (Drainage infrastructure): (Structural foundation support): (Wood materials): (Hardware): (Long term facilities and grounds upkeep)
  2. Permit and Licensing Fees = $15,000
    1. Following the Environmentally Critical Areas Code (Seattle Dept. of Planning & Development): Defined in SMC 25.09.020: ~$7500 (*Friends of Yesler Swamp*)
    2. Shoreline survey fees: $250/hour~$4000 (*DPD website*)
      1. Water table and lake survey (*Geotechnical Report)
      2. Erosion control/soil grading plan
    3. Engineering, legal, and administration fees: ~$1000
    4. Insurance contracts: ~$1200/year?
  3. Design/Build Course Fees = 0$
    1. Studio where students design and build projects for local nonprofits. It is funded by the Department of Neighborhoods, local businesses, and the Howard S. Wright Endowment Fund.

 
 

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Tyler Licata

Replacing Chemical Fertilizers with Compost, Compost Tea, and Biosolids

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

The University of Washington has over 161 acres of turf grass. In 2015, 8,620 pounds of fertilizer were applied on campus. Chemical fertilizers can be detrimental to the environment and to the long term health of soils. With global warming at the forefront of scientific research, it is imperative that alternative, environmentally friendly lawn care systems are implemented. Revising the fertilizer plan for the lawns is a potentially important step for grounds management to undertake.
There are multiple options that the University could use for fertilizers. Composting is a centuries old practice that has been found to increase the health of the soil and plants. Using compost extracts, such as ‘compost teas,’ can be a financially and environmentally favorable approach to lawn care.
A water based extract of compost, compost tea, is attracting gardeners worldwide for its supposed benefits to soil fertility and for plant disease suppression. Soils can be supplemented with this microbe and nutrient rich solution. Grounds management currently brews small batches of compost tea for use on the Roses.  
Other fertilizer options are to provide the lawns with biosolids. Biosolids are human excrements that have undergone extensive filtration processes. They are sold by the county and are deemed safe for the public to use. Biosolids have shown to increase the quality and production of grasses. The University could replace environmentally detrimental fertilizers with a usable product that was being wasted.
The managers of the grounds at the university are hesitant to apply any of these techniques to the lawns until there is evidence that it is equivalent or superior to the current practices. The money from this grant would be to evaluate the feasibility of replacing the chemical fertilizers with compost tea, compost or biosolids.
Trials will be conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of these different fertilizers. If they are successful grounds management will look into applying these fertilizers to the entire campus and end our reliance on environmentally detrimental chemicals.
The money from the grant will be used to evaluate the tea being applied to the lawns, pay for the biosolids and hire a student to help setting up and monitoring the project.
 
Thank you for your consideration!
Michael Bradshaw 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Michael Bradshaw

Floating Wetlands Phase II

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $16,000

Letter of Intent:

Summary The UW Floating Wetlands Demonstration Project is designed to occur in two phases: Feasibility Analysis (I) and Implementation (II).  The Campus Sustainability Fund accepted the Green Futures Lab’s Phase I proposal, which we anticipate to be completed during Winter quarter 2016.  Project goals currently achieved by our Floating Wetland Student Team include:  
• investigating optimal installation locations and conditions; • researching and classifying the habitat needs of juvenile migrating salmon;  • identifying permitting agencies and permit requirements; • building relationships with agencies, stakeholders, partners, and interested parties; • articulating design criteria responses to particular conditions and concerns; and  • developing preliminary conceptual designs.  
Phase II funding will enable the team to develop appropriate designs, create detailed drawings sets for required approvals and construction,  acquire  materials, obtain permits, and see the project through construction, installation, maintenance, monitoring, and evaluation. CSF assistance will also allow our Floating Wetland Student Team to co-lead a scheduled Spring 2017 seminar, bringing the detailed knowledge gained in Phase I to a larger group of interdisciplinary students who will develop possible alternative prototypes for further consideration.  We anticipate improvement of Union Bay aquatic habitat - especially for outmigrating juvenile salmonids - and moderation of pollutant loads through the deployment of these floating wetlands.  Furthermore, this project will provide a compelling educational example for our students while setting precedence for other Seattle water bodies, showcasing UW’s leadership role in green technology and public/community partnerships.  
Brief Explanation of the Phase II Floating Wetlands Project Water is an integral part of the University of Washington campus, and in our mission to be sustainable, its importance cannot be overlooked. In other parts of the world, floating wetland structures are being successfully used to reduce harmful substances in waterways such as metals, excess nutrients, and other pollutants. They sequester carbon, mitigate water temperatures, and provide habitat for aquatic biota. Here in the Pacific Northwest, floating wetlands are an emerging technology. The Floating Wetlands Demonstration aims to exemplify future aquatic sustainability in a visible and participatory manner, raising public awareness in an exciting new fashion.    
Floating wetlands are designed to increase vegetative cover and habitat for aquatic and avian species, especially where hardened shorelines limit habitat quality. They hold significant potential benefit in the greater Puget Sound region as extensive shoreline hardening has contributed to great decline of critical species and is a significant “Vital Sign” targeted by the Puget Sound Partnership.  However, as an innovative approach toward habitat creation and restoration, floating wetlands have little precedence in the Pacific Northwest.  As such, floating wetland implementation faces intense scrutiny prior to implementation.  This necessitates thorough research, forward-thinking design approaches, and clear communication.  Thus far, 
students working on Phase I of the Floating Wetlands Demonstration have succeeded in these categories and look forward to taking the next steps toward implementation of this valuable approach.  
Our conversations with permitting agencies and tribal representatives have drawn support and highlighted barriers toward installing innovative floating wetlands to improve shoreline habitat in the waters of the UW campus.  The Green Futures Lab hopes to apply 2017 CSF funding toward continued project development.  We will build upon current design and research as student staff members are retained to create and co-teach a Spring 2017 seminar.  Funding would allow our student Floating Wetlands Team to co-lead this course, applying their multidepartmental expertise while bringing in additional students as registered course participants. The course would also draw upon faculty and professional proficiency located at UW, City, and County, and State levels. Students in the seminar would gain knowledge and understanding of:    • occurrence, use, and diversity of floating wetlands in other parts of the world; • environmental conditions of Union Bay and Portage Bay and their relation to potential habitat and juvenile salmon migration patterns; • design criteria applied to understanding coastal zone policy and treaty rights within the Lake Washington-Lake Union fish migration corridor; • designs of floating wetlands created for other locales and their results; and • potential materials that might be used in appropriate new floating wetland designs for the UW campus.  
Application of this knowledge will result in designs for a range of floating wetlands suitable to conditions in UW campus waters. From this benchmark, the Floating Wetland Team will select a final site and design(s) for installation.  The subsequent implementation phases include:  
• final selection of sites and floating wetland prototypes to be installed (working directly with permitting agencies); • submission of permit applications for the specific prototypes and sites;  • detailed drawings and material selection for the floating wetland prototypes to be installed  construction and installation of the prototypes; monitoring and maintenance of the floating wetlands;  • development of a webpage interpreting the floating wetlands and their intended function, with a QR code linked to the webpage placed onshore near the wetland;  and  • creation of presentation(s) to be given to UW students in relevant wetland, ecology, fisheries, and ecological design courses.  
Estimated Phase II Costs We anticipate that Phase II of the project would operate through Fall term 2017 with a total cost of $16,000.  This would compensate our team of three students leading the Spring seminar, and over Summer and Fall 2017 with the team working part time to bring the demonstration project to full fruition.  We anticipate a materials and transportation (of materials) budget to be approximately $1800 of the total figure.   
The Phase I Floating Wetlands Demonstration Project funds have supported investigation, design thinking, and coalition-building to advance floating wetland installation along UW shorelines in Union Bay and Portage Bay.  Representing both the College of Built Environments and the College of the Environment, the GFL student staff of three have performed extensive research on and response to environmental conditions of UW waters; fish habitat needs and limitations; permit requirements and permitting pathways with the appropriate agencies; siting opportunities and constraints; and development of resulting design criteria for local floating wetlands, incorporating stakeholder needs and insights from the region. We have also cultivated awareness on the part of permitters of the technology, who are interested in considering our resulting design proposals. We are enthusiastic to continue the permitting, design, construction and education for these demonstration prototypes that may be scaled up to inhabit the Lake Washington-Lake Union basin to make a measurable difference in the aquatic health of our university and region.  
 
Primary Contact First & Last Name: Jackson Blalock

Electric Bicycle Mail-Delivery

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $69,200

Letter of Intent:

 

UW Mailing Services Campus Sustainability Fund LOI

Electric Bicycle Mail Delivery Program

 

Define the campus environmental problem that you are attempting to solve:

 

University of Washington’s Mailing Services currently delivers mail and printed material to approximately 80,000 students, faculty, and staff on and off the Seattle campus. There are 12 conventional delivery vehicles performing 20 daily delivery routes that service the entire campus. These vehicles contribute to global warming by emitting carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. The vehicles burn on average, 4,000 gallons of diesel fuel per year and release 96,000 pounds of CO2 into the atmosphere (24 lbs. CO2 per gallon of fuel). Our research shows that replacing a vehicle with an electric assist cargo bicycle will have an immediate impact on the energy consumption, CO2 emissions, noise pollution, and vehicle congestion on the UW campus.

 

Describe your proposed solution to this problem:

 

Our goal is to make UW the first large university in the nation to address the issue of energy consumption reduction and climate change in mail services, by creating an E-Bicycle Mail & Package Delivery Program. We are proposing moving 210 daily mail stops, totaling 12 miles a day, to full bicycle delivery. This would involve the purchase of five electric assist bicycles, trailers, and all-weather bicycle shoes. After implementation of bicycle delivery on the main campus, we intend to incorporate the bicycles to expand the program to the entire campus and University District.

 

Vehicles currently in use are leased from UW Fleet Services at a cost of $50,000 per vehicle. As we reduce the need for diesel truck delivery, we will return the vehicles to Fleet Services. This will effectively free up extra money in the mailing services budget, and if unused, the money will be returned to the University’s central fund. UW Mailing Services has recently partnered with UW Creative Communications and UW Copy Services to provide delivery services of their printed materials as well. We would like to, whenever applicable, incorporate bicycles on these deliveries. If successful, we see eliminating one or two of the cargo vans currently in use for these routes.

 

What form and amount of student leadership will your project involve?

 

We will continue our collaboration with the students at UW Sustainability in creating an educational outreach campaign to inspire behavioral change within the UW community. This will involve the use of our metrics to create a "fun facts" media campaign to display on the sides of our new, highly visible electric cargo bicycles and trailers. These fun facts will include the current number of stops along the delivery route, the reduction in diesel fuel consumption, and the amount of CO2 saved as a result of switching to the bicycle delivery system. We hope to connect two UW students currently working for Mailing Services and Creative Communications with the ASUW Graphic Design Office. There they will receive assistance in creating eye-popping illustrations to display the project’s metrics.

 

Our project has an already established a partnership with the ASUW student-run Bike Shop to service and maintain the bicycles. This includes fixing spokes, rims, tires, and adjustments to the trailers holding the cargo boxes. We hope that once electric bicycles become more of the norm in the coming years, the shop will also be able to solve issues with the electric motors.

 

We are looking to make a connection with the Environmental Studies Department in order to include student involvement in tracking metrics for the project. Our goal is to conduct an ongoing carbon footprint analysis, detailing emission reductions from switching diesel trucks to electric bikes. This way we can keep track of the project’s success, and constantly update the metric graphics to display to the UW community.

 

Finally, the project has displayed student leadership with the help of a UW Senior majoring in Finance. After meeting with Douglas Stevens from Creative Communications and UW Mailing Services, he has helped to be the middleman between the time-pressed mailing services and other aspects of the project’s development. His work has involved obtaining more student engagement, working out the budget costs, and drafting up this letter of intent.

 

What amount of funds do you anticipate your project will require from the CSF?

 

We have already chosen the optimal model of the E-Bicycle we wish to implement based on range-per-charge and power necessary to support delivery cargo. The E-Assist Bullitt bicycles cost $6,000 per unit. The bikes would require an additional $6,000 in order to construct two alloy cargo boxes for the front and back of each bicycle[1]. With five bicycles in the fleet, this totals to $60,000.

 

All weather bicycle shoes would cost $100 a pair. We have a crew of 12 riders on our team, hence we would like $1,200 to fully prepare them for the elements.

 

Materials required to print and install graphics on the sides of the cargo boxes would cost $100 per unit. Again, this would be the mailing services logo, as well as fun facts about environmental footprint reductions. For the whole fleet, this would total $500.

 

The ASUW Bike Shop does not currently have the capability to repair motors on the bikes, so we are requesting additional funding for service warranties from the E-Assist Bullitt Company. Service agreements cost $500 a year per bicycle, and we would like to purchase three year warranties for the start of this project. This comes out to $7,500 to cover the entire fleet. We anticipate that the ASUW Bike Shop will have the capability to fully repair any problems with the E-Assist Bullitt bikes beginning in year 2020.

 

Adding up everything in our proposed budget, we are asking for a total grant of $69,200 to fully implement the E-Bicycle Mail Delivery System. We thank you for your consideration in our endeavor. 

 

[1] This price also includes construction and installation of trailers to hold the boxes. We are working on involving students with this construction process, but as of now have received these cargo construction quotes from a local metal-working business.

 

 

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Kellan J. Kinney

University of Washington Campus Sustainability Challenge: Feasibility and Design

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $7,000

Letter of Intent:

More than ever, the onus is on individuals to identify and solve the sustainability challenges we face, while solutions to environmental problems will continue to be interdisciplinary and complex. We therefore need ways to integrate technological, economic, and social expertise across all disciplines, and gather the attention and ingenuity of all people. We believe that web or app-based games have a unique and enormous potential to help address this need across diverse user groups and geographic areas. Games offer an efficient package to educate and promote long-term sustainable behaviors, and can reach broad audiences. They are also interactive and fun, offering an alternative to a “doom-and-gloom” approach that can lead to apathy for conservation and sustainability. When played by large groups, games offer a pathway for individuals to collectivize not only their actions, but also their awareness of and attention to problems; that collective focus is a powerful source of long-term solutions. This is our vision.
Most app or web-based games are developed with one goal: to get many people to buy it. Games around social change have other goals, including delivering information, connecting groups, or encouraging new behaviors. Knowledge of how to design these kinds of games is not currently well developed, and needs to draw information from the fields of psychology, game science, computing, education, and conservation. Furthermore, for games to be impactful requires not only that people play them, but also that the design is tailored with producing certain outcomes. These potential outcomes are diverse and could include educational metrics (e.g., player knowledge about climate change), conservation outcomes (e.g., reduced water use in a dorm), or long-term behavioral change (e.g., increased bussing or biking).
Our proposed project is to conduct a feasibility and design study for an app-based (or mobile-friendly website) environmental challenge game that educates incoming student cohorts about sustainable practices on and around the UW campus. The challenge game that we envision will orient new students to the sustainability resources in their new community, and create incentives and rewards (tangible and otherwise) for taking actions and adopting behaviors that conserve resources. We believe a temporary game or challenge will be most impactful, but the end goal is to influence behavior during the entire time a student is at UW.
Although we have the knowledge and technological capacity to create a game right away, gaming and computer science professionals agree that a feasibility study that includes some creation of prototypes are critical to improving player participation and outcomes. Design options for games are vast, and even slight differences may propel a game to widely-played success or relegate it to obscurity; we are also still at the frontier of understanding what motivates people to play a game with sustainability outcomes. Furthermore, a feasibility study will allow outreach and pre-collaborations with other sustainability efforts across campus (e.g., Earth Day events), programs that could contribute expertise (e.g., Human Centered Design and Engineering), and local businesses. The point of a feasibility study is to take advantage of the creative potential on campus to explore and develop options that would best engage new students; however, some of our prospective design ideas include:
-          A weeklong carbon reduction challenge between University of Washington and Washington State University (or UW Seattle, Bothell, and Tacoma campuses)
-          A series of challenge-based activities that students can engage in for incentives or rewards at local and campus businesses
-          A competitive scavenger hunt during Dawg Daze that orients students to campus sustainability options and needs
The feasibility study will consist of meeting four objectives: 1) a review of existing environmental games or challenges (digital or otherwise), 2) a weekend-long Game Jam to engage students and staff across campus in creating multiple game prototypes, 3) multiple student focus groups or surveys to gain feedback on the game prototypes, and 4) creation of a formal business plan to develop and implement a final game design in a future project. The business plan will include recommendations for optimal designs based on the Game Jam and student focus groups, a timeline to implement a game within the UW academic year, projected costs, and how success of the challenge would be measured. Results of outreach with campus groups, departments, and the business community would be integrated into the business plan as well.
The feasibility study will be led by an enthusiastic and highly capable team. Lauren Kuehne is a Research Scientist at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, who has been fascinated with the potential for gaming applications to environmental problems and has been developing this idea for many years. Rachel Lee is a graduate student at the Information School as well as a professional artist. William Chen is a graduate student in the Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management Program, who is also deeply involved in innovative science communication. Rachel and William were both part of the 2015 UW team that developed a nationally recognized climate change board game, “AdaptNation”. All three project leads are part of the EarthGames (https://earthgames.org/) group at UW, which supports students in developing environmentally-based games. The project leads will bring their collective expertise in communication, design, research, and project management to meet objectives and create deliverables.
We believe the University of Washington is an ideal place to develop this innovative concept. Regionally, we have access to immense expertise in computing and game design, as well as experts in relevant fields of psychology, education, and engineering. UW is also well recognized for sustainability efforts across many different programs. We believe that students, faculty, and staff would be eager to participate in designing, developing, and (ultimately) participating in an innovative sustainability challenge, which could easily serve as a model for other university campuses.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Lauren Kuehne

Dual Flush Toilets at Women's Odegaard Restrooms

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $15,000

Letter of Intent:

UW is a leading university in sustainability.  While being ranked top 5 in the world, we, as a school, have taken the initiative and responsibility to lead by example.  Vincent and I (Robert) have put much thought into the impact and financial benefits a flush free urinal can have on campus.  We want to focus on implementing Water-less urinals at Odegaard Library due to its high traffic.  It has around 15-20 urinals, making this a very feasible project, and is possibly the most used when it comes to bathroom usage.  If UW takes a step in water conservation in a place as rainy as Seattle, how can others ignore the beneficial impact of flush free urinals.
Water-less urinals are a step towards lowering water consumption and carbon footprints.  Water may not be thought of as a limited resource in Washington, but the statistics show that more wildfires and lower water supplies have been evident in this state in the past years.  The whole earth shares the same water supply, and the UW should take action to lower water consumption.  A typical Water-less urinal can save approximately 40,000 gallons of water a year.  At a school like UW, with 40,000 students and a plethora of bathrooms, the amount of water that could be saved is huge.  A typical urinal uses 3 gallons of water per flush.  The flush free urinal uses 0 gallons of water from the first use to the last use.  Imagine how much water could be saved in Odegaard library alone. 
A crucial point about the Water-less urinal is that it does not force users to do anything differently besides not pressing the flushing handle, and lets be honest many often don’t flush when using a urinal.  It is a way for all urinal users to easily lower water consumption, without having to change their lifestyle.  Adding on, these urinals come with a sign/plaque that explains how they work and the saving they do.  Every time someone uses one of these urinals, they will read that 40,000+ gallons of water is being saved because of it.  This constant reminder has the potential to influence people to do more and make a push to further lower their water consumption or carbon footprint.  Adding more signs on how to save water or be more environmentally friendly could further influence users to be more sustainable. 
The Water-less urinal is a pretty simple technology that looks just like a normal urinal minus the flushing handle.  It is uses gravity to send fluids to a trap chamber with a liquid sealant.  This sends waste cleanly down the drainpipes without any smell.  The liquid sealant is usually held in a replaceable piece that uses filters the waste through oil, which is lighter than water, thus trapping waste and smell to the sewage system.  This process is already used to keep the smelly odors from sewage lines re-appearing on the surface.   As for sanitation, urine is sterile and once it passes through the filter, the urine will not be exposed to air where bacteria would normally grow.  Still, this is a bathroom and will need normal cleaning, regardless of what urinal technology.
This project is extremely feasible.  In simple terms this would be a three-step process: purchasing of the urinals and necessary parts, installation, and finally letting the campus know about them with a simple explanation of how they work.  The first step would include finding which urinal brand and number would be the best.  These urinals retail at $250-$1000 per urinal with a $50 replacement piece, which should be replaced after a predetermined amount of uses (roughly 1500 uses, depending on the model).  The second step would be hiring contractors to install the urinals.  These contractors can be found by Vincent and myself or we could use previous contracts that have already worked with the UW.  The purchasing of a Water-less urinal also often comes with an installation option at an additional cost.  As for timing, the installation phase would be relatively quick.  In a place such as Odegaard, one bathroom could be done at a time, so that there would always be at least a few places to use the bathroom when one is being worked on.  The last step is simply placing informative signs on the urinals that explain their water saving effects, and letting students know about the urinal change.  The main potential issue is that if the pipes are pressurized and not gravity based, they would have to be adjusted for the urinals to work correctly.  There is also the possibility of there being conflict with approval, as UW is a public university of the state.  However, both of these issues can be dealt with appropriately if necessary.  These urinals have had large success in California as well as gained popularity worldwide.  It is time UW takes this step as well. 
Funding of this Odegaard Water-less urinal project would be roughly $20,000 for urinals and replaceable pieces for a year with the addition of installation fees, another $10,000-$20,000 (the possibility of having to redo pipeline that satisfy flush free urinals make this cost have such a large range).  Overall costs are subject to vary depending on the model used and installation prices.  This is a large funded project, but it has more benefits than just saving water.  Each flush costs money, so over time these urinals could pay themselves off plus more, including costs for replaceable pieces. In adding to how sustainable of a school it is, UW could benefit from tax reductions and rebates for taking actions to reduce water consumption, as appropriate to city policies. 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Robert Chang
Supplementary Documents:

Friday Harbor Labs Composting Facility: A home for our Rocket 700 composter

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $28,000

Letter of Intent:

Friday Harbor Labs Composting Facility: A home for our Rocket 700 composter

Friday Harbor Labs (FHL) has always prided itself on its sustainability and environmental stewardship, of both the many marine habitats associated with the Labs, as well as the 100s of acres of terrestrial biological preserve in the San Juan Islands administered by FHL. The natural maritime Pacific Northwest setting is a hallmark of the Labs experience for the thousands of students, researchers and other visitors that have short or long stays at FHL over a course of any year. Furthermore, the topics of many of the courses, research programs and student apprenticeships connect to ecology and environmental science, and it was therefore only fitting that FHL became part of the UW College of the Environment about 5 years ago. With the Labs as such a clear beacon of ecological connectedness and sustainability through its many programs, the lack of a fully sustainable solid waste disposal program at FHL represents a glaring disconnect, and a clear and easily addressable area for improvement. 

A composting program is not only desperately needed, but would be widely used. The volume of generated food waste from the cafeteria and residential kitchens is substantial. The cafeteria serves from scores to hundreds of students for 20 meals a week, more than 45 weeks a year, and provides food for many conferences, department retreats, and events throughout the year. Furthermore, 10s to 100s of other resident scientists and students prepare their own meals in campus housing every day. While city-wide composting is available on and around the main UW campus in Seattle, there is no publicly-available composting facility on San Juan Island where FHL is located. 

To address this need for composting, FHL acquired an industrial size composter that could be put to use on campus. In 2014, the Labs applied for and received Campus Sustainability Funds to purchase a state-of-the-art Rocket 700 composter (Figure 1). Unfortunately, it still has not been put into use due to inadequate facilities to house the composter and insufficient funds to build such a facility.

Figure 1. The Rocket A700 composter can process up to 700 liters of  of food waste each week, and requires electricity and a covered housing.

To address this final step required in bringing composting to Friday Harbor Labs, we propose to work with the FHL maintenance staff to design a central solid waste disposal facility at the Labs, purchase the requisite materials and build the structure, and then put it into use. Specifically we propose to do the following:

*Recruit interested FHL graduate and undergraduate students to work with the FHL maintenance staff to design a holistic solid waste disposal facility, that would not only house the Rocket 700 and protect it from the elements, but also contain attractive and user friendly bins for recycling, spent batteries, ewaste, and landfill waste.

*Purchase the materials needed for the new facility (estimated cost: $20,000).

*Develop detailed signage in the facility to indicate to users what waste goes where, and to explain the functioning of the Rocket 700 (using FHL computing and printing facilities; estimated cost: $0). 

*We will also provide information about other composting methods within the facility as a broader impacts effort, educating students, researchers and other visitors alike about the variety of possible composting methods that they can bring to their own homes and communities (as above, estimated cost: $0).

*Provide 5 hours of student support per week during the first year of use in order to maintain the functioning of the composting facility, and identify any issues that need to be addressed for better usability (estimated cost: $8000). 

*Give a two-minute introduction to the facility during the “all-FHL” event orientation that begins each quarter of instruction at the Labs.

*Conclude the year with a detailed report –authored by the students who received the student support– that can function as a guide to proper use of the facility, so that it can be used effectively and efficiently in perpetuity.

*Friday Harbor Labs would then dedicate other funds to continue the program beyond the first year, potentially redirecting funds saved from what will be substantially reduced solid waste (landfill) disposal fees and the availability year round of free compost for groundskeeping.

The benefits of such a facility will be numerous. The most obvious and immediate impact will be to lower the carbon footprint of the Labs by diverting thousands of pounds of food waste every year from the landfill, and help to ensure that ewaste stays out of landfills as well. The output of the composting facility will be usable compost that the FHL grounds crew will put into use in landscaping. Undergraduate and graduate students involvement in the design and maintenance of the facility will develop their management skills and knowledge of composting practices. The facility itself will be an educational experience for all who enter, and will inspire students, researchers and other visitors to enhance their sustainable practices in their own homes, communities and institutions. And, finally, it will bring the sustainable actions at the lab in line with the environmental stewardship that has been such an important component of the research and courses at Friday Harbor Labs for over a hundred years. The result will be a Friday Harbor Labs that is truly a paragon of sustainability in the Pacific Northwest.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Molly Roberts

Sustainable Learning Space - Fisheries Courtyard

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $75,000

Letter of Intent:

To: Campus Sustainability Fund, University of Washington
From: Julia Parrish, Rick Keil, Daniel Winterbottom, Ken Yocom, and Howard Nakase
Re: Letter of Intent – Wallace Hall, Sustainable Learning Space
 
In 2013, a proposal to build an outdoor classroom "sustainable learning space" for Environmental Studies (Program on the Environment) students on the north lawn of Wallace Hall (formerly Computing and Communications) was born out of the tragic loss of Tikvah Weiner, then PoE Administrator, to breast cancer.  At the end of her life, Tikvah spoke to the PoE community about her desire to see this area used for the benefit of students, as a demonstration of sustainable practices, and as a place where experiential learning would extend beyond classroom walls.
 
Following Tikvah's passing, a gift fund was established in her honor to help create the garden.  In 2016, students as well as faculty and staff from Landscape Architecture, Program on the Environment, UW Grounds and College of the Environment Dean's Office came together to create an exciting plan to bring Tikvah's garden to fruition.  We envision a garden that:

  • creates an outdoor classroom complete with hardscape elements allowing discussion sections of up to 20 students to use the space for learning "in the green."
  • showcases a series of sustainability features, including the use of "green" (e.g., local, recycled content, natural, sustainable) materials throughout, a rain garden that can accept roof run-off from Wallace Hall, and native and pollinator-based plantings providing habitat and ecosystem services.  Edible elements will be considered, based on input from the campus Landscape Architect and the UW Farm Manager.
  • demonstrates native, drought tolerant and low maintenance landscaping with the flexibility of a cistern-supplied irrigation system for supplemental summer watering.

 
Landscape Architecture students working with PoE Advisory Board member, Ken Yocom, completed early designs for Tikvah’s garden; thus there is already a basic plan from which to renew and finalize this effort.  Ken has worked with the Campus Landscape Architect, Kristine Kenney and the UW Grounds Manager Howard Nakase to ensure the design meets UW standards and guidelines.
 
Starting in Winter 2017, the Landscape Architecture Design-Build class taught by Daniel Winterbottom will be tackling the final design of this space.  The Program on the Environment students working under a special topics offering of Sustainability Studio will be working on the sustainable program elements of the garden, in conjunction with the Landscape Architecture students in the design-build program.  During Spring 2017, these students will actively construct the garden.  In total, we anticipate a minimum of 30 students will be directly involved in the creation of Tikvah's garden.  Once built, the garden space will be used by Program on the Environment classes meeting in Wallace Hall, experienced by hundreds of students daily as they circulate through the space during class changes, and serve as part of the "western gateway" onto the campus.
 
With CSF funding, this project, and these students, will have the ability to significantly add to the program as originally conceived by incorporating sustainable design elements that will feature cost effective stormwater management and water quality practices.
 
This is an ambitious endeavor, and with strong student leadership and mentoring from several faculty and senior staff, will be a successful and sustainable project.  To that end, the faculty and staff on this LOI have collectively pledged to:

  • directly mentor students involved in the design and creation of the garden (Winterbottom)
  • facilitate intern and sustainability capstone projects connected to the design and creation of the garden (Keil)
  • provide basic support services to the space so that students will be successful in achieving their design efforts (Nakase)
  • provide funding for a TA to assist students in the design-build process and act as a convener bringing all parties together (Parrish)

 
At this point, we estimate a very preliminary budget of $100K for the entire project, of which we have raised $25,000 in private funds to help cover materials, and potential funding to help cover the cost of TAs needed to help the students realize their work (CoEnv - guarantee of one TA; LA - will potentially cover a second TA).  We will be requesting the balance amount of approximately $75,000 in costs from the CSF for the materials, plants and vehicle rental needed to complete the work.
 
The current point of contact for the project is:
Julia K Parrish
Associate Dean, Academic Affairs, College of the Environment
jparrish@uw.edu
206-276-8665

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Rick Keil

Engineers Without Borders Sol Stations

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $14,340

Letter of Intent:

 

The Local Projects sector of the University of Washington Chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) will design and implement phone and computer charging stations powered by wind and solar energy. These stations will be located throughout The University of Washington Seattle campus. The goal of this project is to provide sustainable, and convenient charging for students, and to illustrate how clean, renewable energy can power student lives. This project will begin in a research and development phase.

 

1.     Environmental Impact

Part of the EWB mission is to create lasting, sustainable change following the ideal of “Teach someone to fish, they eat for a lifetime”, which follows the goal of sustainable building and growth. To achieve this ideal we are using renewable sources of energy: wind and solar. The UW is a part of Seattle City Light’s “Green Up Program”, which means 100% of the energy it buys is renewable energy, yet many students don’t know this. If students see a wind turbine, or a solar panel, charging their phones it changes the way they think about energy. It promotes this idea of using renewable energy to power their everyday lives. These stations will also provide technical knowledge and real world engineering skills to the members of the UW chapter of EWB, who will be designing this system.  

 

2.     Student Leadership & Involvement

UW Chapter of Engineers Without Borders, Local Projects Sector, will lead this project. This is a student run chapter that focuses on developing and honing technical engineering expertise. The local projects team, made up of Civil, Environmental, Electrical, Mechanical, and Human Centered Design Engineers, will design a working prototype. We have professional mentors who can assist this mainly student led project.

 

3.     Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

Busy college students on the go need to use their digital devices for work and to keep track of their lives. Having a convenient way to charge these devices is critical to student success. If students realize that this power is  renewable it will promote the idea of sustainable power. UW EWB will promote our project at fundraising events, at meetings, and on our website. This will help to spread the word beyond our campus to the surrounding Seattle community. A section of the local projects team will also work on a poster and sticker campaign. We will put these posters up around the school which will teach and illustrate the way in which we used solar and wind power to charge their devices. The stickers can be a way to promote our ideas to students, who might paste them on their water bottles and computers, promoting sustainability everywhere they go. A monthly focus on any of the three pillars of sustainability, social, economic and environmental, could be illustrated on the stations. For example we could discuss how UW has composting facilities located around campus, and how to properly use them. We will also promote our project at events like the Earth Day Festival and the Sustainability Fair for CSF in October.

 

4.     Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability

To create a sustainable product, our team must first research and develop a “prototype” which works in the most efficient manner. Each station will consist of a high capacity battery pack to hold charges. Depending on location and design choice, a wind turbine or solar panel will be mounted atop the station. This power producer will be connected to a circuit system which will convert the mechanical energy of the wind, or the photovoltaic energy of solar light, into electrical power for storage in the battery. The circuit system at the station will be inside of a locked box which will be hidden from view. It will be accessible if repairs are necessary. Outlets for charging will be located on the outside of the station for student use. We might even provide Apple and Android charging plugs. The whole station will be protected by weatherproof casing, so as to block it from rain.

 

Another aspect of the project’s feasibility is to discover the best locations for these chargers. We will have some near buses, outside libraries, and in places like the quad or red square, where students charge while enjoying the outdoors. The goal is to provide convenient access for students. Phase one will test the product in the school environment to establish the most efficient design, and optimize the sustainability.

 

Our Local Projects team is lead by Maeve Harris, who has worked on wind turbine efficiency. The head of International Projects, Bryan Bednarski, worked on a project that set up charging systems for electric cars. Sage Berglund, Head of Fundraising, worked on solar cookstoves, and solar technology. EWB has mentors who can advise on large scale, technical questions.

 

We need to know where on campus we will be allowed to build, and place the stations. This will require us to meet and talk with UW Facility Services. We already have a relationship with them for the on campus Solar Kiln.

 

Engineers Without Borders is a longstanding club at UW. International Projects last at least 5 years so EWB has a record of staying with projects until they are finished. As a chapter of EWB we will finish our project and have a written analysis of the project describing how the goals have been met. As a campus community we must keep pushing forward to create sustainable systems. As part of EWB’s mission we will not only finish this project, but also keep it running sustainably. Part of our funds will be allocated to maintenance repairs.

 

Solar/Wind Charging Station Budget (Per station)            
               
Item Cost/Unit Units Total per Item      
High Capacity Lipo Battery Pack (20000 mAh) $150 2 $300.00        
Solar Panel (100 W) $100 4 $400        
Wind Turbine (450 W) $400 1 $400        
Microcontroller / power management $80 1 $80        
Printed Circuit Board / voltage divider $50 1 $50 * Can order for same price in sets of 3-4
Wiring, cabling, charge ports, connectors $100 n/a $50 * Will only need to purchase once in bulk
Analog Circuitry $20 n/a $20        
System stand $200 1 $150        
Weatherproof casing $100 1 $100        
Panel/turbine mount $150 1 $150        
Bolts and concrete adhesive $30 1 $30        
               
    Total: $1,730        

 

If we construct 8, which is the original plan, the total will be $13,840

$500 for any unforeseen maintenance costs.

 

Total Cost: $14,340   

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Andreas Passas (Project Lead)

Interactive Biogas Food Cart

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF:

Letter of Intent:

UW Campus Sustainability Fund Letter of Intent

Project title: Biogas Cookout/ Cooking Class/ Food Cart

SafeFlame is a local startup, co-founded by Kevin Cussen - a Foster School of Business evening MBA student. SafeFlame empowers families in the developing world to have clean-burning cooking fuel by providing an affordable service that converts organic waste into fuel. SafeFlame’s digesters utilize biologic process that break-down organic waste in a closed environment. The byproduct of this digestion is methane, which can be used as a fuel source to power a cookstove. The SafeFlame team has developed three potential projects, all involving cooking with biogas.

One potential project involves constructing a cart that has a cookstove installed that runs on biogas. This stove could cook hot dogs or popcorn, which could be sold at events or at high foot traffic areas of campus. We expect the research, design, construction, and operation of this project to be less than $20,000 and to provide high visibility and “teachable moments” into alternative fuel sources such as biogas.

Another potential project is a cooking class utilizing biogas. Different cooks could come in to showcase international dishes or dishes made with local, seasonal, and sustainable ingredients. The SafeFlame team is in early discussions with the UW co-op as well as several local food co-ops and farmers on the execution of this plan. The cost for this project would likely be under $10,000.

The last potential project is a biogas barbeque or cook-off event. This would be an excellent chance to showcase the utility of biogas, while testing the efficiency in a real, event-style cooking situation. For this project, the SafeFlame team would heavily engage with different groups on campus to promote the cook-off. We would work with the CSF to scope an appropriate sized “cook-off” to achieve the goals of the CSF.

1. Environmental Impact

Burning biogas has the potential for reducing environmental impact. Human activities, especially the the developed world, cause organic waste to accumulate and rot. When this waste decomposes in anaerobic environments, such as in landfills, it produces methane and other greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is 25 times more effective at trapping solar radiation than carbon. Furthermore, in many developing countries where wood or charcoal are primary cooking fuels, the use of these fuel sources is a primary driver of deforestation and serious health issues. If more organic waste was utilized in technologies such as biodigesters, we could reduce environmental impacts from both of these sources while also providing a valuable service. Furthermore, current cooking fuels, both in the global south and global north, can have hazardous effects on the environment. Specifically, in the United States, cooking with natural gas has dubious implications for environmental sustainability, as hydraulic fracturing is associated with numerous negative effects including methane leakage and ground water contamination. Based on the active environmental community at the UW, we believe the CSF is the perfect vehicle to raise awareness of the benefits of cooking with biogas and our goal at this point is to spread awareness and build community support. 
 

2. Student Leadership & Involvement
The CEO of SafeFlame is an evening MBA student at the Foster School of Business. Furthermore, a large team of interdisciplinary students ranging from engineers to geographers have committed significant efforts to the SafeFlame mission over the last 18 months. Dr. Mari Winkler from the college of civil and environmental engineering is the firm’s principal investigator and the organization has close ties to several schools and organizations at the UW.

3. Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

All of our project proposals have a heavy focus on education and outreach. Though many students at the UW may have heard of biogas, they may not know the practical uses or limitations of the technology. With our project(s) we intend introduce or inform students on additional options in the cleantech space and encourage them to lead more sustainable lives. We expect this introduction may lead to a greater interest in biogas in future years and proposals focusing on sustained use of biogas at the UW.

Furthermore, the educational component of having students working with companies in the space cannot be understated.

1.     4. Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability:

SafeFlame is an on-going concern concentrating on the introduction of biogas as a viable business. These activities dovetail perfectly with supporting each of the above outlined projects. Business lead Kevin Cussen has years of management experience coordinating complex projects successfully and research advisor Dr. Mari Winkler has coordinated multiple research efforts in anaerobic and aerobic digestion.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Caelan

University of Washington Sustainability Action Network (UW-SAN)

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $50,000

Letter of Intent:

INTRODUCTION
Last Spring the Campus Sustainability Fund contributed $1,000 to the Next Systems Teach-in, which brought together more than 350 UW students, faculty, and community members interested in a sustainable campus, region and world. Over a series of discussions lasting eight hours we identified a key issue: many sustainability projects, initiatives, and groups, on campus and off, are not connecting messages and actions across projects, and therefore are not fully realizing their desired social and environmental impact. Better networking, coordination, and publicity would make a significant difference. By weaving sustainability projects into a campus network, we can grow student organizations, make them aware of each other, facilitate events that engage more students concerned about the environment, and help drive change at UW.

 
PROPOSAL
To create sustainable behavior change on campus at a meaningful scale we propose to build a network and resource center. The ‘SEED Center’ will offer resources to connect and catalyze sustainability groups and student activists to create collective impact beyond the sum of individual efforts. We request $50,000 for this two year social infrastructure project to support student staff in platform development, management, and organizational events. The funds will pay for development of a campus wide networking platform. The platform will have resources and contact information that link sustainability organizations, calendars of events, featured projects, news feeds, ways for students to become involved, and bridges between campus projects and the larger community. The center will provide a space to share and spread ideas, connect groups with overlapping interests, and create a living record of sustainability activities on campus. It will also host a social network map to assist groups in targeted outreach. The funds will also support convening and connecting promising leaders with other innovators working to improve social and environmental conditions,,connecting diverse student groups and departments in order to generate and share ideas across issue sectors.

 
IMPACT
The SEED Center will boost the impact of dispersed sustainability projects on campus by growing student-student and student-faculty cooperation, provide a platform for outreach and collaboration, educating community members about the importance and urgency of addressing the underlying connections between environmental and economic justice, and helping students develop paths for transformative action.

 
Environmental Impact: SEED offers a platform for student-led coalitions to amplify the message and actions of sustainability projects and groups, help them to be more effective in reaching their goals, and work with other groups that have overlapping interests. By combining policy with practice, the network has the potential to catalyze existing efforts and reach deeper goals in reducing the environmental footprint of UW.

 
Student Leadership & Involvement: There are over 50 sustainability-focused groups at UW, and over 50 social justice focused groups at UW. By providing an open access platform to bridge the gap between siloed groups, SEED will engage thousands of people in meaningful discussions and activities at the intersection of the economy, democracy, and the environment. The development and maintenance of the platform will rely on the continued involvement and outreach to campus groups, students leaders, and faculty, and will grow as campus movements gain momentum. Because SEED will be maintained by students involved in network building, SEED can evolve as needed, and remain flexible, accountable, and useful for years to come.

 
Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change: Similar to the grassroots campaign which created the campus sustainability fund, this project seeks to create meaningful large scale behavior change by empowering stakeholders to recognize the importance of intersectional networking and activity coordination as strategies to advance sustainability values on campus. Convenings, such as our spring teach-in, will bring together stakeholders to engage in meaningful dialogue around the intersections between issues of democracy, the environment, and the economy, with the aim of breaking silos and building interdisciplinary coalitions. The open access SEED platform will act as a vehicle for education, outreach, and behavior change, while building a living history of campus activities and their outcomes.

 
Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability: Rethinking Prosperity began as an undergraduate seminar and student blog aimed at understanding how to link environment, economy, and politics to create more effective understandings about sustainability.  The project has already drawn a unique mix of undergraduate and graduates students, community leaders, and faculty. This team is well positioned to make SEED a success. The Next Systems Teach-In revealed the timeliness of these topics and the broad campus interest, as reflected in sponsorship and collaboration among many diverse student and community groups such as Radical Public Health UW, United Students Against Sweatshops (USAS), Black Social Workers, MEChA, Urban@UW, Got Green, Women of Color Speak Out!, 350.org, Community to Community Development, and academic departments such as the department of History, Geography, Communications, Political Science, and Social Work. SEED will add new student leadership as funding permits, and continue to build community ties that promote accountability, grassroot support, and participation.

 
The Team:
Nathaniel Matthews-Trigg is a graduate student in Public Health and has been working on the design for SEED as part of his practicum project. He is a founder of Radical Public Health, Climate Justice Forum, and South Campus Organizers groups, and has identified dozens of UW organizations that will be invited to join SEED.
Lance Bennett, director of CCCE and Rethinking Prosperity, is professor of political science and communication, and has received the James A. Clowes award for development of learning communities at UW. His ties with many campus departments will help SEED grow into a sustainable learning community.
Deric Gruen, a community leader and graduate of the UW Evans School, he is a project manager for Rethinking Prosperity, and has connections to environmental groups throughout the greater Seattle area.
Caterina Rost is a political science graduate student who is writing her dissertation on how ideas about sustainability travel in society. She will help develop the SEED platform and create a publishing format and templates for affiliated organizations to use.
Emily Tasaka is an undergraduate communication major who has begun archiving publications and related projects to create a resource base for the center.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Emily Tasaka
Supplementary Documents:

SER-UW Whitman Nature Walk: A Pathway Through Restoration

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $14,712

Letter of Intent:

Summary: Designed by students and built by students for campus wide appreciation, the Pathways Through Restoration development plan will cultivate a community of successful leaders in environmental stewardship. The Society for Ecological Restoration UW Student Chapter (SER-UW) has been working for the past five years to locate areas of the University of Washington’s campus that have become degraded in different ways and to restore them into functioning ecosystems. As part of this, we have put a great deal of effort into restoring a north campus site near McCarty Hall to a native forest ecosystem. Our active restoration of the site is approaching an end as we near completion of invasive species removal and reestablishment of a native understory. However, it is important to remember that even as the McCarty Hall site becomes self-sustaining, the mission of restoration is ongoing. With the Pathways Through Restoration project we hope to communicate the importance of environmental restoration and consistently inspire advocates for a healthier world. As the plan develops, we will lead collaboration and open-discussion among environmentally-focused groups on campus and embolden the community towards establishing an ecologically healthy relationship between nature and culture. The Project: Our development plan entails completing restoration on the McCarty Hall site, an achievable goal over the next two quarters. This will involve a number of native plant salvages and student work parties to finish removing invasives and plant the salvaged native plants. As this work comes to a close, we will turn the site into a community space as a tool for environmental education, a setting for relaxation, and a place to contemplate human involvement in nature. This will be accomplished with a series of pathways, benches, interpretive signage and an art installation. To further promote SER-UW and our mission of restoration, we will also host several social and educational events over the coming year. We are planning a guest lecture from a professional with ties to restoration as well as several general meetings and discussions about restoration projects. Environmental Impact: Restoration of the McCarty Hall site has drastically improved the landscape and ecosystem functions of the area. Prior to our group’s work the site was overgrown with non-native and invasive plants including Himalayan Blackberry, English Ivy, and Holly Trees. By removing these invasives, we have encouraged greater biological diversity on the site. Furthermore, the native plant species that we have introduced have flourished and serve to support native wildlife. However the main goal is to go beyond turning the site into a native garden and create an interactive natural area through which we can raise awareness of the value of ecology, the effects of human impact, and restoration efficacy. Student Leadership and Involvement: There are few opportunities like ours that empower students to take part in molding their campus. Periodic work parties bring together more than thirty new members of the UW community each quarter. We have partnered with introductory environmental classes to offer service learning credit thus incentivizing active student participation in restoration efforts. By encouraging students to help with the restoration, we foster a sense of ownership in the project. Once a student works on the site, they’re more likely to care for the land, introduce it to other students, and recognize other human impacted ecosystems. We create a space that continually welcomes new contributors and restores a sense of community. Education and Outreach: The site itself has already helped to build a strong community around restoration by bringing together other environmental organizations as well as volunteers from a variety of backgrounds. With the Pathways Through Restoration development plan, we hope that it will also become a community gathering space around which environmental restoration can be discussed and witnessed firsthand. This site is not solely designed to raise awareness but also to encourage participation and inspire change. Interpretive signage will provide information on the benefits of our work and the native species that have become established on the site. Through meetings and discussions held on and off the McCarty Hall site, we will further inspire environmental consciousness. Feasibility, Accountability and Sustainability: SER-UW includes a diverse group of students committed to this project and its success. From undergraduates in the College of Engineering to PhD students in the School of Environmental & Forest Sciences, we all feel passionately about the continued impact of our site. We gratefully acknowledge that our success has been dependant upon a number of partnerships between other groups and organizations. With help from UW Grounds Management, UW Botanic Gardens, Union Bay Natural Area, and King County Native Plant Salvage, we have cleaned up much of the McCarty site thus far. It is well on its way to being a self-sustaining natural ecosystem. With these partnerships already in place, we will be able to finish the restoration work and move forward. Our partnership with students in the Landscape Architecture department will provide us guidance on the development of the site. Anticipated budget: In our preliminary budget, we estimate needing $7,000 *(Budget has been reevaluated since LOI submission) to cover the costs of our proposed expansions. We are working at a quicker pace than the group ever has in the past and our budget from SEFS no longer covers our needs. This money will help us in finishing the restoration of the McCarty Hall site, increasing the infrastructure there for community engagement (i.e. benches, signs, art installation), and hosting several social and educational events to promote environmental stewardship and collaboration.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Cameron McCallum

Educational Signage + Benches for Kincaid Ravine

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $3,385

Letter of Intent:

 
Educational signage and benches for Kincaid Ravine aims to install 2 benches handmilled from leftover timber cut down by the campus arborist, and 3 12"x12" educational signs designed by UW Museology students and produced professionally by Fossil Graphics. This educational "nook" is located on the eastern perimeter of the Kincaid Ravine restoration site, and borders the Burke Gilman Trail (BGT). 
 
Environmental Impact
An educational nook will directly amplify the environmental impact of the Kincaid Ravine restoration project. Passersby will be able to connect the visible vegetation changes and flower blooming in the site, with written text and images that explain the purpose of these changes. It is also a technique for drawing more volunteers into the project as a way to channel the enthusiasm of the local community. 
 
The specific environmental themes that the 3 signs will elaborate upon include
 
1) Title Sign: Includes A) title "Welcome to the Kincaid Ravine restoration project", B) <50 words of text explaining  the concept of forest restoration, native vs. invasive vegetation, C) partner logos including the CSF, Earth Corps, King Conservation District, UW Botanical Gardens, Friends of the Burke Gilman Trail
 
2) Wetland Sign: ~100 words of text explaining the importance and wildlife potential of restoring this hydrologic feature. 
 
3) Pollinator Garden Sign: ~100 words of text explaining the importance of native pollinators (native bees, hummingbirds, songbirds) and describing the pollinator gardens that were installed underneath the power lines (colorful spring flower bloom will be aesthetically complementary to this sign). 
 
Student Leadership & Involvement
 
This will be an excellent opportunity for students from multiple departments to work with Facilities to successfully fund, design, produce and install signage and benches.
 
The lead on this project will be Andrew Jauhola, a Project on the Environment capstone student that will be interning in Kincaid Ravine this winter quarter. Other students connected with the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) will be involved in supporting this project and installing the benches and signage. Matt Schwartz, the current graduate student Project Manager at Kincaid Ravine will be supporting Andrew and SER volunteers in this effort. Mueseology students Angela Mele and Kate Nowell will be designing the signs and facilitating production. 
 
Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change

Signage at this high visibility location will be an impactful tool to A) spread awareness about forest restoration ecology B) publicly recognize the partners and funders who have made this project possible.  Elisabeth McLaughlin, Architect of the Forest Segment of the BGT reconstruction, is enthusiastic about incorporating this educational nook into design plans for the new trail to optimize the chance for pedestrians and bicyclists to take a rest off the trail and learn about the restoration project. 

Many Kincaid Ravine work party volunteers are used to students, local community members  and BGT users approaching to ask more about the project, or to comment on the visible success. Signage will legitamize the restoration by deeming it official, and the benches will be a chance to invite these curious passersby to become part of this natural oasis for a few minutes. This connection to nature can be invaluable for urban dwellers. 
 
 
Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability
 
Precedence for bench production and installation by SER at the Whitman Walk restoration site has facilitated the process for connecting with the UW Facilities Maintenance and Construction department to implement this project.  Ed Mckinley of UW Facilities has met with Matt Schwartz and is setting aside hazard tree timber that has been cut on campus for this project. The sustainability factor of keeping dead wood on campus is marked. Rather than importing produced benches, or selling this lumber off campus, these downed trees will live out there life span on campus. We aspire to further smooth out this process in order to encourage more student projects to utilize UW timber for benches around campus. 
 
This project was approved by Landscape Architect Kristine Kenney, with the parameters that sign size would be small, signs would remain low to the ground, and all installed items could be moved if need be. 
 
A continuity of signage and bench design for Whitman Walk and Prairie Rain Garden will create an educational flow of environmental concepts throughout the campus. All three projects will be working with the same designers and production company to achieve this flow. In the case of future 'green tours of campus' this will create a connected culture of outreach. 
 
The benches are fixed in the ground, each with 2 long galvanized metal stakes. The benches are extremely heavy but can be moved as necessary. A chain with I-hooks will ensure that they are not stolen. They will eventually decompose in their natural process but will maintain their function for decades.
 
The signage is made of phenolic resin with a 10 year graffiti proof warranty (Fossil Industries). The signs will be solidly mounted on a single post, and can be moved if needed.  
 
 




CATEGORY ITEM DETAILS COSTS
SIGNAGE      
    http://fossilgraphics.com/graphic-panels  
    631.254.9200  
    info@fossilgraphics.com  
    received Email estimate  
       
  Production costs 238.00+ shipping +hardware 238
  Tax 9.60% 22.84
  Shipping estimate 100
  Hardware estimate 750
    choose from hardware options.   
    1/2" has threaded holes in back for "blind mounting"  
  Design labor 14 hrs @ $60 = $840 840
  Proof printing 15 15
       
       
       
       
  Total 3 Signs 12"x12" 1965.84
       
       
       
BENCHES      
  Bench production + delivery x 1 708
  Total 2 benches   1416
       
  Sum Total    3381.84
       

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Andrew Jauhola

2017 TSA Night Market Recycling Program

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $999

Letter of Intent:

Project Summary
The UW Night Market has been an event held in Red Square every year since 2001. It is one of the Taiwanese Student Association’s signature events and easily the largest in scale in terms of people. The event recreates traditional night markets in Taiwan and is centered around food. Last year, we had 24 total vendors. Every year, this event creates large amounts of waste that isn’t properly disposed of by guests; this year, we plan to create a recycling plan that alleviates this issue.
The plan is based on ZeeWee, a Zero Waste Event. The goal is to heavily reduce waste with a three-step process. First: replace all food containers with recyclable ones. Some containers are vendor specific and will require funds to replace in house. The second step is to eliminate bottled water and replace them with water stations and recyclable cups, which will also require funds. The third step is to assign waste reduction tasks to staff and volunteers. These tasks will include monitoring garbage disposal bins to ensure proper sorting, after event cleanup, etc. Most importantly, the plan will require a radical redesign that will ensure a greener Night Market but will severely strain our already tight budget.
Environmental Impact
With around 6000 people per year visiting the UW Night Market and 24 vendors, there is a large amount of waste being generated. By working closely with vendors and supervising trash containers, waste should be reduced by at least half and recycling increased by an even larger margin. This isn’t a plan that will be implemented once. The 2017 Night Market will set a precedent for all following Night Markets.
Student Leadership and Involvement
The UW Night Market is primarily run by the Taiwanese Student Association officers, a group of 45 dedicated students. There is also a sizable number of volunteers that help out with the event. These volunteers come from various backgrounds; some are members of other UW RSO’s or are students at nearby high schools. Overall, student involvement is prominent. Every year TSA is excited to see so many people participating in the creation of Night Market.
Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change
The hope is for event-goers and our officers to become more conscientious and aware of the consequences caused by the waste we generate. It is hoped that such a mentality will be adopted in the day-to-day lives of those involved in Night Market, and that the effects will extend beyond TSA events, but to the events of other on-campus organizations.
Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability
TSA is a longstanding organization (founded in 1946) that has received multiple RSO rewards. Besides its reputation, TSA is credited with holding multiple large events annually, including a singing competition, semi-formal, and the aforementioned Night Market. A zero waste event is a challenge that we are willing to take on and have confidence in fulfilling considering our vast experience in event planning. TSA is confident in its ability to use CSF monies in a responsible manner.
Budget
Seeing as night market serves 6,000 people, a conservative estimate for reusable water stations would be $500. Food containers would cost an additional $500. TSA requests $1000 to make this a reality.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Anne Wu

Apiary for the UW Farm

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $337

Letter of Intent:

Project Description:The UW farm has built a fenced off area near the new pollinator hedge rows with the purpose of maintaining an active, educational bee hive. The enclosure is complete and all that is left is to set up an apiary for the bees to live in. We are asking for $337.70 dollars to buy a complete apiary and bee keeping kit from a local vendor in order to house our hive. 
Environmental ImpactHoney bee populations are currently in steep decline. Between 2015 and 2016 alone, 44% of beehives were struck with colony collapse. There are a number of environmental factors that contributor to colony collapse such as the use of harmful pesticides on neighboring crops. As an educational farm that serves the larger UW community and interacts with thousands of students each year, the UW farm has the ability to inform students of this affliction. Moreover the UW farm has begun to provide educational opportunities to the greater Seattle community and has the ability to inform a large group of people a out bee-safe practices and hobby beekeeping. 
Student Leadership & Involvement: The UW farm currently holds student leadership roles for each operational aspect of the farm. For instance, there is a student in charge of mushrooms on the farm, a student in charge of chicken acquisition and so on. The addition of a bee keeping program on the farm would open a new leadership role on the farm of the "bee manager." This student would be in charge of coordinating care for the bees and maintaining their population on the farm. The bee manager would also be responsible for making sure the hive was available for educational purposes such as field/class trips.
Education, Outreach, & Behavior Change: The UW farm hosts class trips for a number of UW classes, as well as volunteer and student leadership positions. The addition of a bee hive at the farm would provide the opportunity to inform these students about one of the most serious environmental issues of our time first hand, bee population decline. Having giving students hand-on interactions with these insects helps to alleviate fears regarding bees and increase the understanding their incredible importance in the field of agriculture and beyond. 
Feasibility, Accountability, & Sustainability: This project is being backed by professor Evan Sugdan of the biology department. Prof. Sugdan is an entomologist who has been teaching and practicing beekeeping for many years. Prof Sugdan has offered to supply students who he has personally trained in beekeeping to teach UW farm workers how it is done. Prof Sugdan will also be utilizing the UW farm hive in his bee keeping classes, and will therefore be helping to maintain it. As mentioned before, the secured area and enclosure for the hive has already been built. If this grant money is received, there will be no follow up expenses, this is a one-time request for the funds to buy an apiary. As soon as funds are acquired, the UW farm will purchase and pick up the apiary from the Ballard bee company in Seattle, WA.
 
Budget:
Basic Beginner Kit – Ballard Bee Company - $307
Sales Tax – Washington State – $30.7

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Emily Schwartz

Greek Community Energy Challenge

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

The purpose of the Greek Community Energy Challenge is to make the Greek community an alternate living option that is just as sustainable or more sustainable than the dorms. As a Greek community, we are striving to make UW’s community be competitive nationally in sustainability. We hope to expand the Energy Challenge and in the future start a competition between dorms, campus buildings, and the Greek community, as demonstrated by Greek communities at other schools.

The students of the Green Greek Representative Program believe in taking the first step towards creating a sustainable and renewable community for the whole Greek community to share. We are an entirely student led organization containing of representatives of the 2300+ women in sororities, and the 2100+ men in fraternities here at the University of Washington. We believe in the education of all members of the Greek community in becoming more knowledgeable about the ways in which we can preserve our society for ourselves and future generations. One idea that we are focusing on is developing and implementing an IFC mandate that all houses must have an executive sustainability chair. This would help in encouraging all houses to participate in the push to become more sustainable for years to come.

Our project could educate up to 5,000 undergrad students at the University of Washington living in the Greek community about energy saving techniques. Our Greek community has a strong and prominent presence across campus and is capable of influencing and educating other students about lessons learned from the energy challenge. Education will lead to behavior change when people understand how their action might be costing them money that they could be easily saving. We would advertise the challenge via posters and in doing so create and gain awareness of how to use energy sources sustainably. It is time for the Greek community to have a larger involvement in environmental issues and how to solve them; the Energy Challenge would be a great starting point for gaining involvement in a new and innovative way. This project directly encourages behavior change through encouragement and keeping other members in check, and makes people rethink the unsustainable way we currently use energy in our chapter houses. We would also provide resources, tips and materials on ways that chapters could reduce their energy consumption.

Sean Schmidt, the sustainability specialist, is our main advisor, and we are receiving guidance from environmental staff at UW such as Kristi Strauss and other Seattle stakeholders such as Sally Hulsman from Seattle Public Utilities and Elizabeth Szorad from Recology. For this project, we need energy bills, consisting of electricity and heat, from each participating chapter house. We already have access to some heating and energy bills from certain chapters, so we can assume that we can get bills from other chapters with ease. Members of our team have already been working to implement sustainability changes in their respective chapter houses, including switching out faucets for low-flow alternatives, installing motion detectors for lights in common rooms, and switching out fluorescent lights for LED alternatives. Ten chapters will participate, so we expect to pay $120 per chapter per year for a total of $1200 for Wegowise, the utility tracking program, and then $300 for rewards for the winner of the competition. In addition to the grant, we are requiring chapters that want to participate to pay $50, for a total of $500 dollars that will go towards paying the rest of the Wegowise fund and the reward. After we get approved for the grant, we will go around to chapters who have aggreed to participate and collect their utility bills in the first week of winter quarter. The second week of winter quarter we will begin tracking the utility data and continue to monitor the data through winter quarter. The first week of spring quarter we will start the challenge by giving tips to participating chapters. We will update the chapters on how they are doing in the competition throughout the quarter, and we will wrap up the competition around the 8th week of spring quarter, by distributing prizes to the winners.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Jane Green

Increasing drought tolerance of campus lawns with endophytes

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $1,000

Letter of Intent:

University of Washington’s Sustainability Research:

 

Increasing the drought tolerance and nitrogen efficiency of the lawns on campus

Introduction:

In the United States turf grass has an estimated surface area three times greater than any other irrigated crop (163,812 km^2). Establishment and maintenance of turf grass require high inputs, especially in regard to nitrogen and water (Milesi et al., 1995). Chemical fertilizers can be detrimental to the environment and to the long term health of soils. With global warming at the forefront of scientific research, it is imperative that alternative, environmentally friendly lawn care systems are implemented.

The University of Washington has over 161 acres of turf grass.  Grounds maintenance, at the University applies a custom, slow release nitrogen fertilizer (F-6 Wil-Grow Wil-Cote Custom-CFM 25-0-5) for all turf applications. In 2015, 8,620 pounds of fertilizer were applied on campus. We are looking into the possibility of lowering this number as well as increasing its sustainability practices. Currently, one of the main goals of ground management is to review ways that can decrease the carbon footprint of the University. Revising the fertilizer plan for the lawns is a potentially important step for grounds management to undertake.

Endophytes, micro-organisms that live within plants, have the potential to lower the need for these chemical fertilizers. Two ways that endophytes can accomplish this are by fixing nitrogen and by producing plant growth hormones. Nitrogen gas is the main constituent of the atmosphere, but it is unattainable by plants in its gas form. Endophytes are able to convert this atmospheric dinitrogen gas into ammonium, a usable plant product (Knoth, Kim, Ettl, & Doty, 2014). Endophytes can also decrease the need for chemical fertilizers by producing the plant growth hormones indole acetic acid (Beyeler, Keel, Michaux, & Haas, 1999), and cytokinin (Timmusk, Nicander, Granhall, & Tillberg, 1999).

This research attempts to quantify the effects of endophytes on turf grass in the field. Biomass, photosynthesis, weed suppression, leaf color, and drought tolerance will be measured. After the research is completed, an evaluation will be conducted to assess whether the inoculation of the campus lawns with endophytes is a viable replacement for the current chemical fertilizer plan at the University of Washington.

 

Literature Review:

In the greenhouse, water stressed perennial rye grasses inoculated with endophytes were taller, stayed green and lived for longer than the non-inoculated control. The inoculated plants had 60% higher root and 48% higher shoot biomass than the non-inoculated control (Khan, Guelich, Phan, Redman, & Doty, 2012). A wild poplar (Populus trichocarpa) endophytic bacterium (WPB) was found to have an enzyme, nitrogenase, that is associated with nitrogen fixation. WPB inoculated and non-inoculated Kentucky bluegrass were grown in nitrogen-free mediums. The inoculated plants had 42% more dry weight and 37% more nitrogen than the non-inoculated control (Xin, Zhang, Kang, Staley, & Doty, 2009).

 

Materials and Methods:

This research will focus on answering the following questions about the effects of endophytes on turf grass:  1) What would be the economic and environmental costs for the University of Washington to inoculate their turf grass with endophytes?   2) Does endophyte inoculations effect the health and growth of turf grass? 3) Does endophytes inoculations help to suppress weed growth? 4) Does endophyte inoculations increase drought tolerance? 

There will be ten different treatments looking at the effects of applying endophytes on the lawns on campus. Each treatment will be completed in a 3’ by 3’ plot. Plots will be established at the Center for Urban Horticulture. If needed plots will be hand weeded and seeded in the spring of 2017.  Scotts Sun and Shade mix, the turf grass used on campus, will be utilized in this study. Endophytes will be applied using a back-pack sprayer immediately after mowing.

 

Budget and Timeline:

The research will begin in the spring of 2017. The majority of the 1000 dollars will be applied to hiring a student intern to establish the plots and take measurements throughout the year. Around 50 dollars will be spent on media to grow the endophytes on. The project will be undertaken for around two to three years. If the research shows promise we will apply for a new grant and grounds management will apply endophytes onto the lawns throughout the entire campus. Thousands of gallons of water and thousands of pounds of fertilizer could potentially be saved from being applied to the lawns.

 

References:

Beyeler, M., Keel, C., Michaux, P., & Haas, D. (1999). Enhanced production of indole-3-acetic acid by a genetically modi ¢ ed strain of Pseudomonas £ uorescens CHA0 a ¡ ects root growth of cucumber , but does not improve protection of the plant against Pythium root rot. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 28, 225–233.

Khan, Z., Guelich, G., Phan, H., Redman, R., & Doty, S. (2012). Bacterial and Yeast Endophytes from Poplar and Willow Promote Growth in Crop Plants and Grasses. ISRN Agronomy, 2012, 1–11. http://doi.org/10.5402/2012/890280

Knoth, J. L., Kim, S. H., Ettl, G. J., & Doty, S. L. (2014). Biological nitrogen fixation and biomass accumulation within poplar clones as a result of inoculations with diazotrophic endophyte consortia. New Phytologist, 201(2), 599–609. http://doi.org/10.1111/nph.12536

Milesi, C., Elvidge, C. D., Dietz, J. B., Tuttle, B. T., Nemani, R. R., & Running, S. W. (1995). a Strategy for Mapping and Modeling the Ecological Effects of Us Lawns.

Timmusk, S., Nicander, B., Granhall, U., & Tillberg, E. (1999). Cytokinin production by Paenibacillus polymyxa. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 31(13), 1847–1852. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0038-0717(99)00113-3

Xin, G., Zhang, G., Kang, J. W., Staley, J. T., & Doty, S. L. (2009). A diazotrophic, indole-3-acetic acid-producing endophyte from wild cottonwood. Biology and Fertility of Soils, 45(6), 669–674. http://doi.org/10.1007/s00374-009-0377-8

 

Thank you for your consideration! 

 

Michael Bradshaw

Ph.D. Student, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences

Center for Urban Horticulture, University of Washington

Integrated Pest Management and Sustainability Coordinator: Grounds Management

Mjb34@uw.edu

 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Michael Bradshaw

Surviving Catastrophe: Public Health and Solidarity in an Era of Climate Change

Project Size: Small, <$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $550

Letter of Intent:

Our Registered Student Organization, Radical Public Health, is planning an event titled "Surviving Catastrophe: Public Health and Solidarity in an Era of Climate Change". We are organizing this event because we believe that, in the current political context, it is more important than ever to have honest, unapologetic discussions about the root causes and myriad dangers of climate change while we, as students, prepare to inherit this future. The event, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for 3/1 from 5pm-7:30pm in SCC 316, and will consist of a lecture by Rob Wallace, a scholar based at the University of Minnesota, followed by a panel discussion led by four speakers from the Seattle-based activist group Women of Color Speak Out. We are requesting $550 from CSF in order to increase the diversity of views presented and backgrounds represented at our event by inviting more speakers from Women of Color Speak Out.
 
Rob's lecture is titled "Capitalocene Park: Lucrative Risks in Neoliberal Public Health", and will focus on threats to public health and other dangers of climate change in the context of John Bellamy Foster and Jason Moore's debate over the effects of capitalism on nature (and more specifically on influenza and other pathogens). Rob is an evolutionary biologist and public health phylogeographer who has published dozens of articles on agriculture, infections, ecological resilience, and dialectical biology. In 2013 and 2014, he gave four popular seminars at UW’s Jackson School and Simpson Center.  
 
The Women of Color Speak Out discussion panel will be an interactive session focused on climate change, its connection to systems of oppression, and intersectional activism. The panelists from Women of Color Speak Out are Sarra Tekola, Afrin Sopariwala, Yin Yu, and Zarna Joshi. Sarra Teokla is a scientist and activist who works on the intersecting movements of Black Lives Matter, mass incarceration, and climate justice. Afrin Sopariwala is a climate justice activist who brings spiritual activism and an intersectional framework to the mainstream climate movement. Yin Yu is a systems practitioner who creates spaces that allow for connection and exploration. In her work, she searches for patterns, paradoxes, and leverage points in complex systems. Zarna Joshi is a writer, organizer and public speaker who has published books on Hindu spirituality, self-examination, and cross-cultural understanding. She frequently appears in the media to provide perspectives on climate justice and social justice. Women of Color Speak Out have presented at a number of public and private spaces around Seattle; their public events have each been attended by around 200 people.
 
Our event will provide a space for radical perspectives focused on the structural causes of the climate crisis, including our economic system and neocolonialism. We believe that audience members will come away from the event with a deeper understanding of the root causes of the crisis, as well as concrete steps for participating in climate justice activism in Seattle. This consciousness-raising effort may increase the sustainability of the practices of attendees, including UW students, by encouraging them to, e.g., re-examine their consumption patterns in light of this improved understanding of the role of economic systems in changing our climate.
 
Our specific goals for the event are to:

  1. Contribute to the debate on the root causes of climate change by incorporating diverse and radical viewpoints in order to inform the conversations on healthy and sustainable alternatives.
  2. Expand the discussion on the social determinants of health and their relation to economy, power and the environment under 21st century globalization.
  3. Create a creative and engaging space by students and for students, in collaboration with other members from Seattle and UW’s community.

Radical Public Health will leverage its broad base to draw students, faculty, and staff to the event from a variety of departments across campus; our listserv currently contains nearly 400 hundred members from UW and the broader Seattle community. We will be printing posters as well as attempting to include our event in newsletters such as the SPH News Catcher. Moreover, our sponsors GPSS and ASUW have offered to advertise the event through their networks.
 
Our RSO advisor, Phil Hunt, has supervised us throughout the planning process. We have already received a majority of our required funding from GPSS, ASUW, and the Alumni Association Fund, but are requesting $550 from CSF so we can invite four panelists from Women of Color Speak Out and rent two more microphones. Our complete budget is below:
 

Expense Cost  Notes
Rob Wallace $1,400  $1000 Honorarium and $400 flight
4 Speakers, Women of Color Speak Out $1,000  $250 per speaker
Event Space, SOCC 316 $300  $90/hr for room
 $120 for 2 wired microphones
Print advertising $100  
TOTAL COST OF EVENT: $2,800  
         Funding currently received $2,250  From GPSS, ASUW, and UWAA
Total requested from CSF $550  

As for our timeline, we have been planning this event since the beginning of the 2016-2017 academic year. It will take place on the evening of March 1st, 2017, from 5 to 7:30.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Nicholas Graff

Ballo Conservatio: Dance Conservation (Photography Piece)

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $7,000

Letter of Intent:

March 28, 2016

 

Campus Sustainability Fund Committee:

 

As the world evolves humans are slowly beginning to understand the disturbing impact their carbon footprint has on the planet’s resources. How can we grow this understanding? How can we lure individuals into thinking differently about the sustenance of our home, The Earth? I believe an effective way to increase the public’s awareness of sustainability is to change its perception of a person’s relationship to the planet. Art can do that. Art can change perceptions. It can create unexpected relationships. Art can take common notions and change them into evocative images.

 

The University of Washington is a gorgeous campus surrounded by the beauty of a wide range of ecosystems that require the care and attention of the university’s students, faculty, staff and organizations. The grounds are well maintained and respected. The educational activities that take place on the campus are held in highest regard. But how can we bring the inner workings of every day into sharper focus? Are all Huskies thinking as responsibly and thoroughly about recycling, consumption and more environmentally sensitive alternatives in their daily living activities?

 

The proposed project is a series of still photographic works that will be showcased permanently across campus in a variety of venues for the UW population to view. The exhibit will be a walking series that will reach beyond one building or one gallery––rather, reaching in all directions across campus. Celebrated local photographer, Steve Korn, and choreographer and graduate student, Joseph Blake, will team up to work with UW undergraduate dance majors to create powerful visual moments of humans interacting with renewable resources––such as paper, water, recyclable dishware, etc. As is clearly evident in the accompanying images by Korn, he knows how to make inanimate objects come alive and he masterfully engages the viewer on an intimate, human level with texture, light and shadow.

EXAMPLE PHOTOS PROVIDED ON SEPARATE FORM BEING SENT TO VERONICA.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

Many individuals are extremely conscientious about the role they play in sustainability. Others are less engaged, or have never been galvanized to be actively involved. This project is aimed at the latter two groups of individuals–– the people who have been caught by the current arguments about the need for sustainability. This project puts a human face on the issue. It will be looking in a graphic, human language at how a person may be lured into thinking about recycling, consumption and environmentally responsible behavior.  This project literally looks at sustainability through a different lens.

 

STUDENT LEADERSHIP

During my initial three quarters as a graduate student the UW, I have been studying and pondering issues of cultural and economic inequity, dance for diverse populations and human anatomy. Both on and off campus, I have established liaisons with teachers and activists in several areas including Dance for Parkinson's disease, Yoga Behind Bars, Dance and Autism, and Dance and Disabilities. I am a humanist, and activist and an artist. I am an ardent believer in the importance of socially responsible actions and the sustenance of our environment.

 

EDUCATION

The final outcome of this proposed project is an aesthetic reminder of humans’ responsibilities to the planet, the campus and the community. The series will raise issues of sustainability that encourage recycling, connect the effect of humans’ involvement to nature and cultivate awareness our planet earth as home.

 

The culmination of the project will be a three set series of six photos that will be displayed at the Suzzallo Library, HUB and Meany Hall Theatre Lobby. These venues have been selected for the volume of students and faculty that travel through these establishments on a daily basis. For each series there will be an observational sheet and “drop box” that will allow for gallery strollers to reflect upon their interpretation of the work provided, as well as contribute solutions for why they feel the arts and community can better affect change in hopes of success for sustainability on campus.

 

Prior to the reveal of the photo series there will be a reception for university and community members to attend that will provide information about campus sustainability, a meet and greet with the photographer, Steve Korn, and graduate adviser/choreographer, jo Blake, as well as a performative collaboration with the dancers from the shoot about campus sustainability. This performance reception will unite many organizations and programs directly in hopes of sparking interests between the university/community members and the arts fields.

 

FEASIBILITY

The proposed project is absolutely possible and necessary to provide a new and unique way to collaborate the arts, community and the concept of sustainability. With the provided sponsorship from the Dance Program and faculty sponsor, Hannah Wiley, a statement of community effort comes into existence. The idea is not what will this change do for myself, but how will change effect the community and the resources that we, as products of the planet, use on a daily basis. The project will be an artistic endeavor that will span a period of a month considering the time it will take to shoot, edit and frame. The projected costs for an exhibit as such will cost approximately $7000 when taking into account photographer, dancers and the technical aspects for a photo shoot.

 

The project is to be finalized and ready for premiere by celebrations of Sustainability Month in October of 2016

 

PROPOSAL BUDGET AND TIMELINE PROVIDED ON SEPARATE FORM BEING SENT TO VERONICA.

 

If there are any further questions or inquiries, please feel free to contact me.

Joseph Blake (Choreographer/Dancer/Artistic Coordinator)

801.230.0449

jbblake@uw.edu

www.joblakedance.com

 

Steve Korn (Photographer)

stvkrn@comcast.net

www.stevekornphoto.com

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Joseph Blake

Engaging Students and Public in Marine Conservation Through Sustainable Shellfish Aquaculture

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $20,000

Letter of Intent:

The UW School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences (SAFS) is home to some of the world's leading experts in shellfish biology, genetics, and disease ecology. Faculty and students are actively engaged in applied research to inform and improve shellfish aquaculture and restoration. Shellfish aquaculture is major economic driver in Washington and the Pacific Northwest region, supporting over 3,200 jobs and contributing over $270 million per year to rural and coastal economies (http://www.ecy.wa.gov/water/marine/oa/2012report_summary.pdf). Shellfish, in turn, act as natural filters, improving water quality while creating habitat for other aquatic species. Unfortunately, despite the positive impacts of shellfish research at SAFS, there are few, if any, opportunities for students to experience shellfish farming first-hand. The goal of the proposed project is to establish a student-run shellfish farm at Big Beef Creek, a SAFS field research site on Washington’s Hood Canal. The proposed project specifically addresses all four criteria set by the Campus Sustainability Fund RFP.

Methods: The UW Shellfish Farm is modeled after the UW Campus Farm in Seattle, in which students rotate and share the responsibilities of operating a sustainable food production system under the guidance of experts. Shellfish “seed” –i.e. juvenile oysters and clams - will be acquired from partners at the Puget Sound Restoration Fund and Taylor Shellfish Inc., and deployed in the field. After approximately one year, market-size shellfish will be harvested and sold through campus eateries and a subscription service offered to the UW community. Like the UW campus, revenue generated through product sales will be directed towards maintenance, and the repayment of loans associated with start-up costs. It is our goal that the shellfish farm be self-sustaining. We propose to draw upon the cumulative expertise of SAFS faculty, industry and conservation partners to ensure the farm is properly designed, built and maintained. Support from the Campus Sustainability Fund will be directed towards the initial cost of grow-out equipment and shellfish seed, as well as the development of outreach and environmental monitoring programs.

Environmental Impact: The Farm will be located at Big Beef Creek Field Research Station, a 400-acre site owned by the University and administered by SAFS. Big Beef is comprised of a flowing freshwater creek, salt marsh, mud flats and other prime shellfish habitat. Wild populations of Pacific oyster, geoduck clam and other shellfish currently thrive at Big Beef, attesting to the suitability of the site for our project. The aquaculture system we propose to install is low impact, and poses minimal threat existing natural resources. Rather, enhanced shellfish populations in Big Beef Creek will result in reductions in turbidity, reduced nitrogenous wastes, and improved habitat for invertebrates and juvenile fish. We propose to implement a monitoring system to quantify the ecosystem impacts of shellfish aquaculture (see “Outreach”).

Student Leadership & Involvement: The UW Shellfish Farm was conceived by several SAFS graduate students, and will remain a student-led and -operated venture. The Farm will provide opportunities for multiple levels of student involvement, but will rely upon a sufficient base level of available labor. To minimize risk associated with under-staffing, the size of the Farm will be scaled appropriately to match the level of student participation. We are currently building our network of Faculty and Industry advisors to ensure we abide by business “best practices” in this regard.

Education, Outreach & Behavior Change: Shellfish aquaculture is sustainable as it requires no food inputs; shellfish derive nutrients by filtering phytoplankton from the water column. As such, shellfish aquaculture is intrinsically linked to estuarine health. The proposed project will serve as a natural teaching laboratory for topics pertaining to water quality, estuarine ecology and climate change impacts. We propose to conduct outreach through several channels. First, we will develop a monitoring system for estuarine health. Specifically, we will monitor bacterial levels, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and other water quality metrics to quantify the long-term impacts of the Farm on Big Beef Creek. Data from our monitoring program will be incorporated into ongoing SAFS research and disseminated to the scientific community and general public.

Second, we propose to develop several experiential outreach programs for UW students, local K-12 schools, and the general public. Curricula will focus on estuarine biodiversity, marine pathogens, and the impacts of ocean acidification on marine invertebrates. SAFS graduate students and Faculty currently conduct research in these areas, and will lead educational outings on the farm during low tides. UW students volunteering on the farm will have a unique immersive opportunity to experience the estuarine environment.

Finally, the Farm will serve as a field site for ongoing SAFS shellfish research. Carolyn Friedman (SAFS), an advisor on the proposed project, is currently leading an investigation into the genetic basis for “resistance” to ocean acidification in the Pacific oyster.

Feasibility, Accountability and Sustainability: Establishing and maintaining a shellfish farm is a large undertaking, but one for which the applicants are prepared. Two of the graduate students leading the proposal have experience working in oyster aquaculture. In addition, the proposed initiative benefits from the technical supervision of four SAFS core faculty, one SAFS Post-doc, and several industry experts, including the 30-year owner/operator of a successful shellfish aquaculture operation. We will continue to meet with SAFS administrators and University personnel responsible for the use of Big Beef Creek, as well as Food Service personnel involved in the distribution of seafood products. SAFS currently employs a full-time caretaker at Big Beef Creek who will monitor the project when students are not present.

We are in the process of developing formal partnerships between the UW Shellfish Farm and Washington Sea Grant (WASG), Puget Sound Restoration Fund, and Taylor Shellfish Inc. We are seeking financial and material support from all three sources that will supplement awards received from the Campus Sustainability Fund.

Conclusion: The UW Shellfish farm will provide a unique opportunity for students and the public to experience a globally-important means of sustainable food production, while learning about the effects of human disturbance and climate change on the marine ecosystem.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Daniel Gillon

A New Home for UW Biodiesel Cooperative: Construction of Permanent Lab Space

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $89,682

Letter of Intent:

The University of Washington Biodiesel Cooperative is an undergraduate-led student organization that was established in 2010 as a way for students to become more involved in waste management and alternative energy through hands-on engineering experience. Currently, the UW Housing and Food Services sells their used cooking oil to the alternative energy company, Sequential Pacific, which transports the oil from Seattle to Portland, Oregon to be refined into biodiesel. The biodiesel is then transported to Seattle to be placed on the market. The UW Biodiesel Cooperative offers an alternative to this production method by the establishment of a closed loop system, in which the waste that is generated from on-campus restaurants is refined on campus, and then sold back to the campus community to be reused in transportation vehicles and other engines as an alternative to petroleum based diesel fuel. With the support of the Campus Sustainability Fund, the Biodiesel Cooperative aims to build a full scale biodiesel production facility on the grounds of Campus Motor Fleet property. This new facility will be modeled out of a large shipping container, and will contain a functioning biodiesel reactor that converts the waste cooking oil generated by the campus restaurants into biodiesel. In order to make this a reality, we will need financial support to cover the expense of building, permitting, and supplies. We will be in cooperation with Mark Miller and Ashley Kangas in the University Capitol Projects Office, and will also be collaborating with Mark Murray at the Environmental Health and Safety department to ensure that all safety codes and regulations are fulfilled. When compiled, these costs are substantial, and so we are proposing sponsorship of $85,000 to cover our startup expenses. Approximately $40,000 of this cost will cover the shipping container design and purchase, $20,000 will cover foundation and land preparation and the remaining costs will go to permitting and salaries for architects, inspections and planning services. Supporting the UW Biodiesel Co-Op will achieve the goals of the Campus Sustainability Fund by reducing emissions, eliminating waste, transitioning away from petroleum diesel and educating the community on alternative and green initiatives. The use of biodiesel relieves environmental impact on the University of Washington and the community as a whole by reducing carbon emissions, reducing fossil fuel use, and recycling waste oil into a useful resource. We aspire to increase recycling on campus by reducing reliance on pollution-generating modes of transportation. Biodiesel emits 78% less greenhouse gases than diesel fuel. Combustion of biodiesel additionally provides a 56% reduction of hydrocarbon emissions and shows a significant reduction in carbon monoxide when compared with conventional diesel fuel (EPA.gov), bringing the University of Washington one step closer to being a carbon neutral organization. The cooperative also provides University of Washington students with the unique opportunity to combine green energy management with engineering innovation. Built and driven entirely by undergraduates, the group promotes interest and education in the field of green energy engineering by involving students in a rich learning experience. Students proactively meet on a regular basis throughout the school year and engage in multiple activities that prepare them for future careers in the green energy field. Currently, the cooperative engages students by teaching them the basics to making and designing a functioning biodiesel reactor, and helps train them in lab safety procedures and experiment planning. In addition we have a team that works to help secure support and resources from various groups on campus and in the community. With a functioning lab, the student experience will be even further enriched by enabling them to run diagnostic tests, design processes from the ground up, and test procedures to ensure that our product is safe and environmentally friendly. In addition, by securing permanent lab space for the organization, we can ensure that waste oil produced by the university is handled responsibly and in an environmentally conscious way. The Biodiesel Cooperative will enrich the local community by providing education about the biodiesel industry and using waste vegetable oil as an alternative fuel source. In the past, the Cooperative has provided education to local high school science classrooms about the benefits of using biodiesel, and has reached out to local community colleges to provide a collaborative effort in alternative energy education. The Cooperative is also reaching out in an international context by connecting with a project in Jamaica that aims to produce biodiesel through the waste cooking oil generated by resort hotels. With a functioning reactor on campus, the cooperative can enhance this involvement by hosting informational sessions at our facility. Currently, we visit schools and tell them about waste oil conversion, but with a permanent space, we will be able to invite them to visit instead and actually see biodiesel made, from collection to engine. We believe that this type of hands-on experience is essential in building the future of environmentally conscious and green-thinking engineers. With the availability of a full scale lab space, the Biodiesel Cooperative will be able to inspire and enrich the undergraduate community by providing an impactful experience which will encourage students to pursue career paths in sustainable engineering. Students who are engaged in our project gain an understanding of alternative energy production, research, and commercialization, and leave our program better prepared to make a positive difference in the future of energy and sustainability. The UW Biodiesel Cooperative would be honored to receive the support of the Campus Sustainability Fund in their pursuit of a greener campus through the establishment of a permanent biodiesel production facility.

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Group Inactive

Sustainable Stormwater Coordinator

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $15,102

Letter of Intent:

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Creation of the Sustainable Stormwater Coordinator (SSC) position aims to designate a SEFS research assistant appointment to spread awareness about and physically improve stormwater treatment on campus. This will be accomplished by investigating the current quantity and quality of campus stormwater, analyzing a suite of suitable water management tools, and building a collaborative student-faculty-administration approach to this pressing issue. In sum, this project will seek concrete and actionable runoff strategies, informed by water quality testing of discharges from parking lots, rooftops and sports fields.
Presently, several campus stormwater projects have begun the conversation about responsibly handling our fresh water resource at UW.  However, the importance of unifying a campus-wide stormwater strategy is urgent, in line with the UW core value of “setting the bar well above merely complying with laws and standards”. The SSC will unite disparate stormwater efforts at UW and channel student efforts towards practical and feasible solutions. For example, the SSC will work directly with Husky Sustainable Storms (HSS) to expedite progress towards project implementation. Additionally, through the involvement of a supportive and engaged team of undergraduates, graduate students and faculty, the position will strongly emphasize educational and outreach aspects. This position has precedence for CSF funding, as set by the CPO “Sustainability Intern”, which compiled energy data to inform best practice LEED building certification for UW. The SSC position will likewise develop a baseline of information, which is critical to direct successful present and future student projects.    
A comprehensive feasibility study will analyze the most practical, effective and cost-efficient innovations that can be designed on campus to reduce stormwater quantity and improve water quality. The RA position and the study will be overseen by hydrology Professor Susan Bolton. The study will be executed in consultation with campus Engineer James Morin, Landscape Architect Kristine Kenney, and Grounds Manager Howard Nakase. Feasibility study specifically includes:
A. Preliminary assessment of stormwater hotspots through selective water quality and soil testing for organic and inorganic pollutants, at key stormwater drainages. Tests for pH, alkalinity, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, will be prioritized.
B. Campus wide stormwater web resource, summarizing pollution impact on Portage/Union Bays, analysis of current stormwater project strengths and pitfalls (including past/present CSF projects). Develop a GIS layer map of campus-wide pollution hotspots, impervious surfaces and potential future mitigation locations.
C. Design of a reproducible, best practice and cost-effective bio-retention model that can be adapted in multiple spots around campus. This can serve as a guiding example for the rising number of students aspiring to develop campus stormwater projects.
 
ENVIRONMENT
A total of 27,000 gallons of stormwater are produced as runoff from a one-acre parking lot, after one inch of rain. In UW parking lots, stormwater picks up oil, grease, metals and coolants from vehicles, and it proceeds largely untreated into Portage Bay and Lake Washington. Other impervious surfaces, like roofs, compound the quantity of overland runoff and inhibit on-site infiltration.
 Typical stormwater systems address water quantity and flooding concerns, but ignore water quality. This project will investigate the most pressing water pollution sources on campus and develop a reproducible model for treating polluted runoff from key parking lots and roofs.
 
STUDENT LEADERSHIP
The SSC is a permanent position that will provide a forum for students to develop the skill set and knowledge base to pursue projects related to water use and waste, including exposure to important local organizations and partnership opportunities in the Seattle restoration community. A multi-disciplinary core group of graduate students, which meets bi-weekly in Anderson 107-C, will provide support to the SSC, including communication and networking, outreach and education, and assistance in water and soil  testing.
The core student group has identified ‘Continued Accountability’ as a primary objective, and envisioned the student RA position through SEFS. Department administrator Wendy Star has agreed to serve as budget administrator for the SCC project should it be approved by CSF. The creation of this position has the written support of HSS, 12,000 Rain Gardens, Puget Soundkeeper, the Plant Microbiology Laboratory, and phytoremediation Professor Sharon Doty. Supporting letters from each will be included in the CSF proposal.
 
OUTREACH
Outreach via social media outlets and a blog will have a key place in communicating this project to the student body. Integration into classes for University credit through SEFS and graduate projects for the Masters in Environmental Horticulture are both possible.
The ongoing SSC position will help to coordinate student stormwater efforts over the long-term, channel communication between students and admin through one informed and capable liason, and collaborate with off-campus entities to establish UW’s leadership in the greater stormwater community.
By having this stormwater point person, combined with regular meetings, water projects around campus will begin to unite, heighten impact through symbiosis, and share information and resources.  With parking lot redesigns throughout campus, this RA can channel student voices of water related considerations with re-development.
 
ACCOUNTABILITY + SUSTAINABILITY
UW was recently certified as a ‘salmon safe’ institution as the beginning of a paradigm shift towards increasing consciousness about our water footprint and impacts on fish habitat. The certifying agency has endorsed the SSC to assist UW in meeting the Salmon Safe Certificate Condition 4: “The UW shall perform an integrated stormwater management plan for the UW campus that evaluates opportunities to provide additional quantity and quality treatment of stormwater runoff”. The SSC will work to generate an ongoing commitment of political will towards progressive stormwater policy and true environmental stewardship. 
Financially, the SSC will research fee-reduction for stormwater treatments (North Seattle Community College saves $60,000+ in annual stormwater fees, the direct result of a campus-wide collaboration where students applied for tax credits through Seattle Public Utilities). Since UW spends ~$1.3 million in annual stormwater fees, economic incentive is clearly justified.
9 months of CSF funding will serve as a kick start to inaugurate this position. SEFS will support SSC with ongoing funding options once position is established.
 
BUDGET
15,102  (figure based on $1678 Schedule A RA position x 9 months)
 

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Matt Schwartz

Husky Sustainable Storms: Bioswale (Phase 3)

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $4,500

Letter of Intent:

Husky Sustainable Storms (www.huskysustainablestorms.org) is asking for $4,500.00 for our contingency budget for the construction of a bioswale on the Seattle Campus of the University of Washington.  The CSF has already contributed $84,220 to the project that will be used for construction and material acquisitions.  Campus stakeholders requested that the  contingency budget be at least 20% of construction costs. Currently, we are approximately $3,000 short in our contingency budget.

Money not spent during construction will first be allocated to signage and education after construction is finished in the Spring. We will be coordinating with CSF on a grand opening and signage details. Any money left over will be given back to the CSF.

We are also seeking plant donations and other grants to help with the extra costs for the finalization of the project.

Project Overview

Husky Sustainable Storms (HSS), an initiative launched by students, faculty, and staff of the University of Washington to mitigate stormwater runoff on-campus by designing and building a stormwater treatment structure that mimics ecological processes and reflects environmental values. Our goals are to:

  1. Improve the quality of surface water flowing from the UW campus;
  2. Advance student engagement in stormwater design, implementation, and education;
  3. Provide a demonstration for UW engineering and transportation services in addressing stormwater issues.

The project has been launched in two phases: (1) a ‘Feasibility Study” and (2) construction of the bioswale.

HSS has successfully:

  • Conducted the Feasibility Study;
  • Procured a project site – North of the Law Building and South of the Burke Museum;
  • Hosted a seminar series about the project;
  • Developed 85% construction documentation; and,
  • Procured approval from the University of Washington for construction in April 2013.

Student Involvement

The student team has fluctuated over the past year and a half during the main design phase of the project. Two student members have graduated and the final three members are finalizing construction documents with oversight from Huitt-Zollars, an outside engineering firm.

Stefanie Young – Ph.D. Candidate in Urban Planning and Design in the College of Built Environments with more than eight years of experience in sustainable design.

Erica Bush – Masters of Landscape Architecture and Master of Urban Planning Candidate in the College of Built Environments

Sunni Wissmer – Bachelors of Arts in Community, Environment, and Planning Candidate in the College of Built Environments

Recent Graduates:

Patrick Green – Graduated with a Masters of Urban Planning and Design and Masters of Public Affairs through the College of Built Environments and the Evans School.

Matthew McNair – Graduated with a Masters of Civil Engineering through the College of Engineering.

FACULTY SUPPORT:

Jan Whittington, MCRP, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor, Urban Design and Planning
Associate Director, Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity.

Peter Dewey

Primary Contact First & Last Name: Stefanie Young

Pipeline Project K-12 Education for Sustainability Student Outreach Coordinators

Project Size: Large, >$1,000
Estimated Amount to be requested from the CSF: $4,050

Letter of Intent:

The UW Pipeline Project is requesting temporary funds to hire an undergraduate student staff member and a graduate student staff member as our K-12 Education for Sustainability Student Outreach Coordinators. The Pipeline Project seeks funding from the Campus Sustainability Fund at this time for two primary reasons: 1) to focus efforts on connecting with and partnering with UW departments and units that explicitly and implicitly serve a diverse student body, AND 2) to shift the Environmental Alternative Spring Break (EASB) program to a self-sustaining student leadership model. Our intention is for these two student staff to work in partnership with Pipeline staff to lay the groundwork for integrating these two new foci into the Pipeline Project without external funding in the 2013/2014 academic year. Specifically, CSF funding would support one undergraduate student to coordinate the 2013 EASB program while laying the foundation for program expansion and developing a self-sustaining student leadership program model. Funding will also support one graduate student to instruct a K-12 education for sustainability service-learning seminar during Winter 2013 and Spring 2013 and expand partnerships with K-12 classrooms and community organizations with an environmental education focus. Through these experiences, UW students develop the skills and capacity to promote sustainability through K-12 education. A major area of focus for these student positions will be to increase the diversity of UW students who participate in these K-12 education for sustainability experiences. As a result, we hope to diversify and increase the overall number of students engaged in K-12 environmental education and ensure continued opportunities for UW students to promote sustainability through K-12 outreach and education. Housed in the UW Center for Experiential Learning and Diversity, the Pipeline Project connects undergraduate students with academic mentoring and volunteer opportunities in K-12 schools and community organizations. One way UW students get involved is through Pipeline’s EASB program where students spend the Winter Quarter developing an experiential, inquiry-based environmental science curriculum, which they then facilitate in elementary and middle school classrooms at Brewster Elementary School in Brewster, WA and the Quileute Tribal School in La Push, WA. Currently, the program is heavily administered by Pipeline Project staff and could greatly benefit from a self-sustaining student-led model, similar to other UW sustainability efforts such as the UW Farm whose expansion and innovations were and are student-driven. Our hope is to develop the infrastructure and establish a student-led EASB program to increase the capacity of the Pipeline Project to not only ensure the sustainability of this program for future students but also to spur innovation and expansion. An additional pathway that UW students get involved with the K-12 community is through Pipeline’s Education for Sustainability service-learning seminar. Students in this seminar explore the field of environmental and sustainability education while gaining first-hand experience by volunteering in a K-12 classroom or community organization with an environmental education focus. As interest for this seminar grows, we aim to expand our partnerships with K-12 classrooms and community organizations with an environmental education focus so that more UW students have an opportunity to develop their environmental education and outreach skills and interests. Regarding the issue of diversity in sustainability efforts, research shows, and our observations in this work would agree, that the field of environmental and sustainability education, as well as the larger environmental movement, largely attracts white and more affluent people (Taylor, 2009; Enderle, 2007). If sustainability efforts are to be far reaching, it is critical that such efforts involve more diverse communities. Locally, on the UW campus, we aim to focus our efforts on diversifying the student body who participates in K-12 environmental education to broaden campus involvement in sustainability efforts and to develop a new generation of diverse student leaders with an interest in environmental issues and the skills to engage in environmental education efforts. Our vision is that these student coordinators will lay the groundwork for increased environmental partnerships and pathways to diversify our student participation in these programs, which will be sustained by current Pipeline Project staff and future student leaders without additional external funding. How Project Will Meet CSF Preferences Environmental impact We believe that for sustainability efforts to have a strong environmental impact, the public’s awareness and environmental ethic need to be raised. We believe that education is a powerful mechanism to inspire one’s interest and care for the environment. Thus, by diversifying, strengthening and expanding these K-12 environmental education programs, the two student coordinators will be making a strong environmental impact by developing the environmental ethic of both a diverse population of UW students and K-12 students, who will then influence their own families and communities towards environmental sustainable behaviors. Through our conversations with numerous students and faculty, there is a growing interest amongst students in the field of environmental education, but the campus is lacking in opportunities for students to cultivate this curiosity. Thus, we hope to support, promote and diversify this burgeoning interest as a strategy to promote sustainability. We will build on our existing partnerships with the Program on the Environment (which has now recognized Pipeline’s Education for Sustainability seminar as an elective), College of the Environment, Community, Environment, and Planning, and environment focused student groups as we recruit students. These student coordinators will also enable us to broaden our outreach and increase partnerships with other UW departments including OMAD, ECC, MESA and a wide variety of registered student organizations. Student Involvement This project has a large emphasis on developing student leadership and involvement. First, the funds we are requesting will be used entirely on student salaries, providing two students not only with an on-campus job, but with a unique professional development opportunity. Also, one objective of these two student staff positions is to increase the number of UW student volunteers engaged in K-12 environmental and sustainability education. Through these hands-on, service-learning experiences, UW student volunteers are developing real-world, tangible skills that they can utilize in future endeavors during their time at the UW and after they graduate. This project offers substantial student leadership opportunities as the goal of the EASB student coordinator is to establish a student-led EASB program. These students will develop critical leadership skills, including project planning, partnership building, teaching, fundraising, marketing, and collaboration skills. We will build on the interest of several returning students who participated in last year’s EASB program who have expressed their interest in this student-led model development. Similarly, the students enrolled in the Education for Sustainability service-learning seminars will increase their involvement and their capacity to lead through their volunteer work in the community, which will provide them with pathways for future involvement in sustainability education efforts. Education and Outreach These K-12 environmental and sustainability education initiatives are inherently educational, both for the university student volunteers (and potential student employees) and for the K-12 students impacted by the programs. The primary purpose of these programs is to cultivate an aware and engaged community that is knowledgeable about environmental issues, cares deeply about the state of our ecological systems, and have the skills to impact personal and policy level changes that impact our earth. Through this service and education work, UW and K-12 students will become more aware and engaged both with the community and about the important work of environmental and sustainability education. By having a focus on trying to diversify the students involved in this work, this project will bring together students from different campus communities to work together on sustainability education efforts. Lastly, this project serves an important function of bridging gaps between the UW community and the community at large by connecting UW students with K-12 students in Seattle and across the state to cultivate an interest in and care for the environment. Feasibility, Sustainability & Accountability We will not n