Growing resilience and equity: Food systems amidst the dual pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Health Impacts of the (In)visibility of UW Custodial Workers

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Mental Health for Every Adolescent

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Sending Gratitude Across the Globe

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Whipping up Resilience in the Kitchen

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Leadership through Sustained Dialogue

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

EOP Scholars Academy Resilience Project

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Empowerment Training for UW Medicine Frontline Women

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Growth of Transfer Students

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Seeds of Freedom

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Bike Tube Upcycling

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Living Art

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF: $950
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Budget Description for Small Grant
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
Plants for living wall15.9931500
Materials for living wall25.9910250
Workshop materials5.99850
Art Therapist to do workshop with us in tandem150

Non-CSF Sources:

Other Funding Sources
Grant TitleAmount
Husky SEED Fund1000
Project Completion Total: $2,000

Timeline:

Timeframe of Project
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Living Wall DesignMarch 2020Beginning of April
Continued workshops with VSLApril 2020Mid April
Build-outApril 2020End of April
Workshops with all other studentsApril 2020Several times
PlantingMay 2020End of May
Workshops with both veteran and non-veteran studentsMay 2020Several times
Training for studentsJune 2020Several times
"Gallery show"Starts June 2020June-Sept 2020
Monthly workshops/trainingsOn-going from summer onMarch 2021

Project Approval Forms:

Sustainable Pots and Clamshells from Pulp Mold

Executive Summary:

Our project centers around obtaining a pulp moulding machine capable of creating pulp molds that can replace a variety of plastic products across campus. The machine would be housed in the Wollenberg Paper and Bioresource Science Laboratory in the basement of Bloedel Hall. Our main mold aims to replace the plastic pots currently used by the UW Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) in the Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH). Our second mold is a clamshell tray designed to replace those currently in circulation at campus dining halls, however, as we have currently not been able to contact HFS to discuss the feasibility of this mold our main focus in this proposal will be the molded pots. Prior to receiving the machinery, we are aiming to create some prototype molds to test how the pots would perform structurally, however, these feasibility tests will not be conducted until we have access to campus again.

 

Student Involvement:

This project can be continuously student-led by undergraduates in BSE and supplemented by ESRM students involved in SER. BSE undergraduates, especially members of the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI), are more likely to be involved because running the machinery and producing these products is relevant to their industry. Learning about this technology is highly applicable to the industry, as plastic products are being replaced by molded pulp products at an increasing rate. These students would be in charge of production, quality control, and continued campus outreach. Production of these products could also be integrated into the BSE curriculum as a permanent part of the Paper and Bioresource Center. This would include an introduction to the machinery in 200-level BSE courses, which would prepare process engineering students to study sustainable production lines later in their undergraduate career. In the students’ senior year during BSE 436, they would learn how to analyze and improve upon the pulp products created from the machine. Lastly in the design-based BSE 480-481 courses, students could explore design economics and perform a full LCA on the machine’s process. In total, the incorporation of this process into the curriculum accounts for 40 students consistently working on production, analysis, and improvements.

Another possible avenue for student involvement is opening an opportunity for an ESRM student to take the data on the end-use of the biodegradable pots. This would provide valuable information for the production and improvement teams, and more data for the project’s progress.

 

Education & Outreach:

To increase the market size for the biodegradable pots after production, we plan to give away samples of our product to applicable campus groups. This involves contacting UW grounds, botanic gardens, and possible food vendors on campus to see if our products are viable replacements for their plastics.

In addition, there are several TAPPI and BSE-related events in which free samples and/or demonstrations could be incorporated. Specifically, TAPPI holds an annual Christmas fundraiser, during which our products could be sold to the public. Sustainability-focused booths and tables at campus events in Red-Square can feature our product.

In terms of education, the technical process detail can be integrated into the BSE curriculum across multiple classes, involving freshmen through senior students in sustainable production processes. ESRM/SER students, and those taking ESRM 412, could also be directly impacted in the education of biodegradable containers in particular. More details in the ‘Student Involvement’ section.

Environmental Impact:
  • Living Systems and Biodiversity
  • Transportation
  • Waste
  • Water
Project Longevity:

This will be an ongoing project run by students, most likely in the BSE major. Kurt Haunreiter, the BSE lab technician and staff supervisor for the project will ensure the project will have a team of students working on the continuation of the project, as well as making sure the equipment stays in good shape. As for future maintenance, Kurt has done some research and determined that any of the parts that might wear out over time are easily obtainable in the US and that he would be able to purchase them if they are damaged. Future students will be in charge of running the machine and producing the pulp pots for continued production. Additionally, this project has the possibility to evolve and increase in scope. Once the machine is obtained, other molds can be obtained for $24,000 each. Therefore, if students on this project find a different product they can produce to increase sustainability on campus, they only need to obtain funding for the mold.

Environmental Problem:

The molding machine will serve as an example of sustainable manufacturing on a pilot scale.

Plastic pots are often used by agricultural and horticultural campus groups. Even though they can be reused, they are still washed out with excess water and bleach. The production of biodegradable pots hopes to decrease the carbon footprint, water usage, and waste associated with these groups. Additionally, the biodegradable pots could improve the soil for plant growth through nutrients in the pulp.

Environmental benefits of these biodegradable pots include:

  • Better aeration for roots
  • Decay of the pot allows roots to grow out into surrounding soil
  • Prevention of transplant shock
  • Compared to peat pots, digested fiber pots require less fertilizer, reducing the possibility of burnt roots
  • Use of brewer’s spent grain - a waste product of a local industry
  • Use of  on-campus plant waste, such as ivy, in the pulp mixture

The additional mold for either food or beverage containers would replace even conventional paper containers. The main difference is the use of non-wood materials in the mold such as wheat straw and brewer’s spent grain. In addition, the products would be made on-campus, reducing transportation.

 

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

The way we can measure the impacts of our project is two-fold. As the saying goes “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” and that is also in order of importance. A plastic pot, even if reused or recycled, still has carbon emissions associated with its production, and it will eventually end in a landfill or nature as litter. SER estimates that they go through 800 1-gallon plastic pots a year. A clear measure of our progress is how many plastic pots we can divert from being purchased. Every biodegradable pot that we produce, will fill the need of one plastic pot and thereby preempt the purchase and manufacture and transport of a plastic pot. Another important measure to take into consideration is the carbon emissions that go into the transportation of the plastic pots. Plastic pots, even made locally, are still damaging to the environment but that damage scales the farther away they are manufactured. Often these pots are sourced overseas and require a great deal of polluting transportation to make it to our campus. Once we know where the pots are sourced from we can perform a life-cycle calculation of the carbon emissions that go into one pot to produce it and transport it to Seattle and scale that up to our production of biodegradable pots. We are also working with SER to see if we can utilize some of the plant waste they gather from their clean-up efforts across campus and incorporate it into our pulp mixture.

 

Total amount requested from the CSF: $129,375
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
KZ-80 Pulping System Cabinet$5,0001$5,000
ZJW2-6650K Mould Machine$79,0001$79,000
Pressure Washer$1,0001$1,000
Forming Mold Set$24,0001-2$24,000-$48,000
High Pressure Water Pump$1,0001$1,000
Vacuum Pump$5,5001$5,500
GZ Auto Drain System$4,5001$4,500
Air Compressor$4,5001$4,500
Air Tank$5001$500
KH40B Forming/Vacuum System Cabinet$2,5001$2,500
Wiring MCC$5,0001$5,000
Transportation$5,0001$5,000
Tariff$37,8751$37,875
Previous CSF Funding-$70,0001-$70,000
Total$105,375-$129,375

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Final ProposalApril 15, 2020
Make Prototype MoldsHopefully we could get started on these in fall, assuming campus is openOctober 2020
Order the equipmentIf approved, the equipment would hopefully be ordered in MayMay 2020
Equipment TransportationThe equipment will take 5-7 months to arrive at campus, so we can expect an October/December arrival if the order is placed in MayOctober-December 2020
Testing PhaseOnce the equipment arrives/is installed we can begin making test molds to determine the best consistencyNovember 2020-January 2021
Make and distribute the potsOnce the equipment is ready and the correct consistency is determined, we will hopefully be ready for production by JanuaryJanuary 2021

Improving the Benefit-to-Carbon Cost Ratio for University of Washington Air Travel

Executive Summary:

With UW air travel nearly eliminated to reduce the spread of COVID-19, the UW community is looking to rethink our options. We want to take this opportunity to examine the unique benefits of travel to UW students, faculty, and staff  in the context of the high cost of emissions from travel - especially as technological solutions for remote collaboration and learning are being rapidly improved and culturally normalized. 

Air travel is a highly carbon intensive choice, yet students value unique world learning experiences while faculty and staff need to collaborate, network and share their findings with others. At the last assessment (2014), air travel made up 11% of UW’s carbon budget. The goal of this proposed project is to identify (and ideally get the campus to implement) policies and protocols that will reduce UW’s carbon emissions associated with flying. The proposed cost of the project is $14,901, which will enable Forrest Baum (a Program on the Environment (PoE) Capstone Student, who drafted this proposal) to collect data about flights taken by faculty, staff and students at UW in 2019; to conduct interviews with UW faculty, staff and students to determine why they fly and assess how their views about alternatives to flying having changed during the COVID crisis; to identify policies and protocols that UW could implement to reduce emissions associated with flying while maintaining its educational and research missions; to create and distribute communication materials across campus and social media about the impact flying has on UW’s carbon footprint and what steps could be taken to reduce these emissions; and, importantly, to document a framework for continued future tracking of UW’s air travel carbon emissions. The funding will enable Forrest to work on this topic full time over the summer and ten hours per week during Autumn and Winter quarters. The work will be supervised by Dr. Kristi Straus (Lecturer, Program on the Environment) and Dr. Rebecca Neumann (Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering). Dr. Straus is a leader in sustainability education and teaches a class (ENVIR 239: Personal Choices, Broad Impacts) focusing on personal choices and action to combat climate change. Dr. Neumann is passionate about understanding and mitigating climate change, both in her research program and in her personal life.

 

Student Involvement:

This will be a UW Program on the Environment (PoE) Capstone project conducted by one PoE student, Forrest Baum. Forrest drafted this final proposal. He will: 

  1. Review literature of previous studies and current views on the topics involved.
  2. Quantify the CO2 equivalent emissions associated with different types of trips for UW faculty, staff and students, including: to conduct research, attend conferences and meetings, give and host seminars, travel to and from campus for out of state students, travel for athletic games, and study abroad.
  3. Design and implement a study that gathers information not covered in previous inventories. 
    • Calculate the CO2 eq associated with out-of-state/international student travel. How often do out-of-state and international students fly round trip home:UW each year? As well as the average distance flown per trip.
    • Assess the benefit of various types of trips (e.g. study abroad, research collaboration, presenting findings) to both the individuals taking the trip and the overall mission of the University, through an online survey of students, faculty and staff.
  4. Determine if and for whom these trips have unintended negative consequences.
  5. Identify policy changes or institutional approaches that minimize air travel with low benefit-to-carbon costs (or have large unintended negative consequences), and enable alternatives to air travel for certain types of trips. 
  6. Provide recommendations and reach out to the appropriate campus units, offices and organizations to enact these policy changes and approaches. 
  7. Use these experiences to create a framework for accessing, compiling and analyzing data needed to continually track UW’s air travel carbon emissions.

Forrest will collect the required data on air travel at UW by harnessing travel reimbursements and trips booked with the central travel account, study abroad enrollments, seminar announcements, trips taken by the athletic department, and surveying students who fly to and from campus. 

 

Education & Outreach:

The overall goal of this effort is to reduce UW’s carbon emissions. To accomplish this goal, the project will raise awareness about the impact of air travel on UW carbon emissions and identify policies or institutional approaches for reducing these emissions while maintaining the educational and research mission of the university. In 2014, a team of graduate students mentored by the UW Sustainability office documented that air travel comprised 11% of UW’s carbon budget (2014 report here). Importantly, the assessment determined that UW is under counting emissions associated with flying due to a lack of easily accessible data. 

Forrest’s efforts for this proposed CSF project will build upon and update the efforts of the 2014 report. His work will be written up as part of his capstone project and will be compiled into several forms. Some of these will be directed at changing UW policies, while some will be directed at changing student, staff, or faculty behavior.

  1. A short Public Service Announcement (PSA) video to share the takeaways and encourage implementation of the identified policies and approaches. 
  2. An easily digestible report that will be shared with UW Sustainability, UW Travel Office, the UW Environmental Stewardship Committee, and other relevant offices across campus.
  3. A detailed report providing step-by-step instructions on how to access, compile and analyze data needed to track UW’s air travel carbon emissions in future years.
  4. A visually compelling poster will be made and distributed to environmental Registered Student Organizations (RSOs) on campus
  5. An infographic that will be created expressly for distribution on various UW social media channels (e.g. RSOs, Program on the Environment). 

The goal of these outreach products is to encourage implementation of the identified policies and approaches for reducing air travel, while also motivating individuals to reduce their air travel whenever possible.

 

Environmental Impact:
  • Transportation
Project Longevity:

This specific project will cover three quarters, involving intensive full-time study during the summer quarter and 10 hours per week during the Autumn and winter quarter. We expect this work to be complete at that time, with our results being used to inform concrete steps UW could use to reduce CO2eq associated with flying.  This work should support UW in achieving the goals of the UW Climate Action Plan and UW Sustainability Action Plan. As such, we do not anticipate a need for long term management, maintenance, or funding for this work. As long term University of Washington faculty members, both Kristi and Rebecca are enthusiastic about the opportunities to work with various UW entities to shepherd this project forward and continuously lobby to ensure that recommended policies and approaches are implemented. If additional questions emerge from this work, Kristi and Rebecca will be happy to mentor additional Program on the Environment Capstone Students in finding answers to those questions. 

An additional lasting benefit of the work will be a documented framework for streamlining the information-gathering process for the air-travel carbon budget to ensure that future emissions numbers can be gathered and analyzed as a part of the regular UW reporting systems, and be available on a regular basis as needed.

 

Environmental Problem:

The sustainability challenge is that air travel is carbon intensive, yet often seen as necessary for student learning, and for professional development across student, faculty, and staff communities in the university. Presenting at conferences requiring air travel has often been a requirement of grant funding and an opportunity for career advancement. Previous studies have found that even environmentally conscious members of the university community often utilize a high amount of air travel. There is a general need for society to rapidly reduce carbon emissions to prevent catastrophic impacts of climate change, and the UW community is taking up the challenge. Through the Climate Action Plan, the UW has a goal of being climate neutral by 2050. We have made progress in reducing our emissions, but we need a full assessment of our impacts in order to understand how to achieve our sustainability goals. The UW needs to be aware of the impact flying has on our carbon emissions and needs to actively reduce these emissions while maintaining our mission. Our project will identify policies and approaches for accomplishing this goal, and our work can lead to an overall reduction in UW's carbon emissions. Current prohibition on travel has created an opportunity to test alternatives which are now being considered as viable replacements. By looking into and analyzing the benefits and challenges of air travel compared to alternatives, we hope to give a fuller view of these aspects in all available options.

 

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

We will  measure the impacts of air travel in CO2 equivalent emissions (CO2eq), which is measured in tons of carbon-emission equivalent of greenhouse gases. Surveys to evaluate personal and professional benefits to individuals and the UW mission will be more personal and complex. Evaluation of unintended negative consequences and “replaceability” of air travel will also be evaluated. We will also calculate the potential CO2eq emissions saved by UW if identified policies and approaches are implemented.

Other project impacts:

  • UW Undergraduate Forrest Baum will get hands-on experience with grant proposal writing, effective survey design, and data analysis to answer questions about which he is passionate. The  impact will be measured with the completion of his capstone project and formal presentation of his work to the UW and Seattle communities. 
  • Campus-wide education about the impact that flying has on UW’s carbon emissions, and the benefit/costs associated with different types of flights. This impact will be measured by the number of campus organizations/offices that read our outreach materials and number of people reached through traditional and social media (e.g., through news stories and outreach campaigns) 
  • University of Washington adopting our recommended approaches will result in reductions in UW travel and associated CO2eq 
  • University of Washington community members interacting with our work can lead to reductions in air travel and more thoughtful choices in regards to additional sustainability behaviors

 

Total amount requested from the CSF: $14,901
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
Student Support (Summer)$16.39/hour40 hours per week x 12 weeks = 480 hours$7867.20
Student Support (Fall & Winter)$16.39/hour10 hours per week x 20 weeks = 200 hours$3278.00
Student Benefit Load Rate20.9% of salaryn/a$2329.35
PoE Administration Support (PoE does not have a full time administrator and we have learned that administration of CSF grants is not time negligible)$30/hour4 hours per month x 9 months = 36 hours$1080.00
Admin Benefit Load Rate32.1% of salaryn/a$346.68

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Literature Review40 hoursSummer 2020
Research Design40 hoursSummer 2020
Collect Data from UW Offices80 hoursSummer 2020
Create and Test Survey40 hoursSummer 2020
Administer Survey120 hoursSummer 2020
Calculate Carbon Emissions40 hoursSummer 2020
Assess Pros/Cons of Various Travel or Alternatives80 hoursSummer 2020
Identify Policies & Procedures for Reducing Travel40 hoursSummer 2020
Capestone Report60 hoursFall 2020
Step-by-step Flying Emissions Framework Report40 hoursFall 2020
Digestible Campus Report20 hoursWinter 2021
Poster10 hoursWinter 2021
Infographic10 hoursWinter 2021
PSA Video40 hoursWinter 2021
Meet with Campus Groups and Offices20 hoursWinter 2021

Project Approval Forms:

Camas Meadows Monitoring at Burke Museum

Executive Summary:

We propose a 3-year plan to monitor the establishment and growth of the Camas Meadow recently installed as part of the new Burke Museums site development. The purpose of this monitoring is to develop a strategic, long-term management plan to assist UW Grounds in mitigating increased costs for maintenance while ensuring the ecological viability and sustainability of the project. Our proposal is grounded in a collaborative approach to support educational goals, and will work with a committed stakeholder group which includes students, a faculty member (Landscape Architecture), the Burke museum, UW Grounds, wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ (Intellectual House), Urban@UW, Oxbow Nursery, and GGN (landscape architecture firm). The project further proposes working with our project partners to develop interpretive strategies and communication plans of the environment as part of the Burke Museum’s mission to educate the public on the natural history of the Salish Sea Region.  As part of this process we propose hosting annual student-led workdays open to the UW community and broader public to be timed with the bloom of the camas plants (April) and harvest of the camas bulbs (June/July).

In a recent survey, it was estimated that in the early stages of Euro-American settlement in the Cascade region there were more than 5,000 acres of prairie habitat of what is today King County.[1]  Though not a dominant ecosystem type within the region the prairies offered critical habitat for many plant, insect and animal species, while further providing resources and nourishment of native communities and peoples. [2] Today, very little of the historical extent of prairies in the region remains, with only a few scattered remnant patches of any significance in size and the plant communities of both have been heavily impacted by the encroachment of invasive grass species. [3] 

The landscape design for the Burke Museum included eighty thousand native plants. Most of these plants were propagated by locally collected seed. For example, much of the camas seed was collected on a small island in the San Juans and the bulbs were nurtured for up to four years in a nursery prior to planting. Establishment and growth of the plants community in the project will be tested against varying management including hand weeding, mowing, and potentially controlled burning. The results of the monitoring research will be compiled into a findings report, that will include a recommended maintenance manual to be shared with UW Grounds, and other land management and design teams interested in understanding how to establish and nourish this rare habitat type. The proposal for three years of monitoring, includes the seasonal employment of five students, the establishment of a long-term management plan, the development and implementation of interpretive strategies, and student-led work days for public education totals $21,720.

 

 

[1] Perasso, David (2018) “Prairies in King County?” (Report), Accessed 2.26/2020; https://davidperasso.net/Camas_Field_files/kingCoPrairies.pdf

[2] Kruckeberg, Arthur R. (1991) The Natural History of Puget Sound Country. (Seattle: University of Washington Press), pp. 284 – 290.

[3] See Perasso, 2018 and Floberg, J. et al. (2004) “Wilamette Valley-Puget Trough-Georgia Basin Ecoregional Assessment, Volume One (Report), Prepared for The Nature Conservancy with support from the Nature Conservancy Canada, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Department of Natural Resources, Oregon State Natural Heritage Information Center and the British Columbia Conservation Data Centre. Accessed 2.26/2020

Student Involvement:

The Camas Meadows Project will take a hands-on, student-led approach to urban land management research. This initiative will first and foremost help students gain research and field experience by studying an existing project on UW campus at the new Burke Museum. Often, landscape architecture students are taught that once in practice, they have considerable creative control over conceptual and construction plans but rarely get to work on the management and maintenance of a given site once the firm has completed the design. Planting plan documents have detailed instructions around planting written by landscape architecture professionals but how does that ensure that information is implemented, improvised upon and passed on? And how does that go beyond planting instructions and into maintenance, management and care? And how can the management of a given site become an educational opportunity to communicate that site’s ecological and cultural significance to the public at large? How can a given site not only become a sustainability model but stay a sustainability model years after its design and construction? This project provides students with the opportunity to work directly with landscape architects, interpretive specialists, land maintenance professionals to understand the issues, concerns, and opportunities in translating the design of urban camas meadows into established and managed landscapes. While we will build knowledge from the several existing research projects on camas meadows in the region such as Novel Plant Communities and Partnerships: Creative Strategies for Habitat Conservation and Restoration in Western Washington Prairies by the Center of Natural Lands Management and Evaluating the Purpose, Extent, and Ecological Restoration Applications of Indigenous Burning Practices in Southwestern Washington published by UW Press, our proposal is unique in that it is investigating the establishment of this plant community type in an urban condition.

With the support of the Campus Sustainability Fund, this project will employ students to collaborate with a diverse team of project stakeholders, develop research methodologies, conduct field research, synthesize findings and communicate those findings to diverse audiences from academic publications to public information. The students for this project proposal will act as interlocutors to bridge the gaps of communication between seemingly disparate entities (private firms, clients, maintenance services, plant nurseries, students, visitors) with the intention of developing management strategies that reduce UW Grounds’ maintenance workload of the meadow.

This project will employ a total of five (5) students over three (3) years. In year 1 and year 2, two students will be employed, with one as lead researcher. The assistant researcher will then become lead the following year to ensure that knowledge gained from the project continues within the student body network and that the management plan stays active, pertinent and evolving. This also will build stronger relations between partners and stakeholders (UW Landscape Architecture Department, the Burke Museum, wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ [Intellectual House], UW Grounds, Urban@UW, GGN and Oxbow Nursery) to be informed of project progress on a biannual basis and continue in the development of interpretive strategies and management practices.

With the support of the faculty advisor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and other partners, the students’ key roles will be: research best management practices of the camas meadows, perform and monitor said best practices as experiments, design interpretation for the meadows and eventually create the management plan document. A student lead researcher will primarily research best practices and establish methods to conduct experiments. The student lead will work alongside an assistant researcher student by the second or third academic quarter to monitor management plan implementation (mowing regularly or semi-regularly, hand-weeding, flame weeding/controlled burning, seed-saving, bulb harvesting and propagation). The intention is that the student lead will transition out of their position so that the student research aide can take their place after their one year contract is finished. At times, the two student researchers will implement the management practices themselves with the help of fellow students (through landscape architecture courses or wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ [Intellectual House]) and Carlson Center service learning volunteers. There will be programming opportunities for campus-wide volunteer work and education days, especially during April (weeding) and June (harvesting) that coincide with UW annual events like Earth Day and graduation celebrations.

Education & Outreach:

Education and outreach is at the core of our proposal. Our project is intended to help advance the university’s objective to utilize all aspects of its facilities and campus as a learning environment. Working closely with project partners, the Burke Museum and wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ (Intellectual House), we will develop interpretive and communication strategies to educate the UW community and public of this rare yet significant and culturally important habitat type. The monitoring  and assessment of management strategies of this site will further integrate with the Burke Museum’s educational mission to provide living knowledge of our environment with the hope to inspire others to explore opportunities that recognize the importance of their surroundings and to potentially offer new and insightful ways to improve and increase our knowledge and interactions of historically important and endemic habitat types and conditions. The research into the establishment and evaluation of distinct management studies will further be disseminated in academic journals and other media outlets such as UW News.

The Camas Meadow is centrally located and adjacent to a primary entrance to campus when the light rail station on NE 43rd St. opens in 2021, and will have high exposure. In many ways, this site will be the first faculty, staff, students, and visitors to see upon entering campus and opportunities for informational outreach will be high. It is our intention to further offer student-led volunteer ‘work days’ on the site to assist with management while educating the public about camas and native meadows as well as the other native landscapes located adjacent to the Burke museum. Initial ideas for public engagement include ‘harvest days’ in June or July during which the camas bulbs will be dug, and during ‘burn days’ during which a portion of the meadow will be burned. These are preliminary ideas, but working closely with UW Grounds, the Burke Museum, and wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ (Intellectual House) will identify the most appropriate strategies for interpretation and outreach.

Environmental Impact:
  • Food
  • Living Systems and Biodiversity
  • Environmental Justice
  • Cultural Representation
  • Social Justice
Project Longevity:

The Camas Meadows Project's longevity will be a total of 3 years for the management report and plan. The interpretation strategies will extend beyond this 3 year mark. 

The active timeline for the management plan portion of our project is June 2020 - December 2022. 

2020 

[June - September]  Research Methods Development, Stakeholder Meeting (2), Field Monitoring, and Student-led Public Workday (1)

[October - December]  Data Analysis

2021

[January - March] Adaptation of Methods, Preparation of Field Season

[April - September]  Stakeholder Meeting (2), Field Monitoring, Interpretive Strategy Development, and Student-led Public Workdays (2) 

[October - December]  Data Analysis and Interpretive Strategy Refinement

2022

[January - March] Adaptation of Methods, Preparation of Field Season

[April - September]  Stakeholder Meeting (2), Field Monitoring, Student-led Public Workdays (2), and Interpretive Strategy Deployment

[October - December] Synthesis of Findings, Preparation of Management Manual and other publications and Project ends.

Environmental Problem:

The Camas Meadow is an integral component of the designed landscape associated with the Burke museum. It was designed and incorporated into the overall site design because of its historical importance in the ecology and culture of the region and its direct association to the mission of the museum. This project offers a great opportunity to more fully understand the potential of this habitat type in the context of a highly urbanized and managed environment. Our proposal for monitoring is intended to provide information for designers, property managers (like the UW), and the public to learn about the ecological and cultural importance of camas meadows for this region and identify cultivation and management strategies to translate their establishment in similar and distinct land use contexts.

Climate change impacts are shifting ecosystems, including urban ones, and it is necessary to adapt to these changes. Camas meadows are unique and endemic to the northwestern region of the United States and are particularly adept to the combination of seasonal fires, drought and occasional flood inundation. For centuries, tribal communities such as the Nez Perce in Oregon have been implementing controlled burns in order to cultivate camas in open clearings as an agroecological practice that imitates naturally occurring seasonal fires. Before chemical weed and pest suppression, fire maintenance was adopted in specific ecosystems of plants that benefited from this regime. Because of this cyclical occurrence, sporadic larger wildfires during drought seasons were significantly less frequent. As climate change continues to bring less snowpack, longer droughts and more wildfires, urban and peri-urban landscapes will continue to experience the effects of it, much in the same ways as their rural and wilder counterparts. 

This project proposal aims to provide ongoing research around the economic implications of native landscapes like camas meadows in urban landscapes. Management and utility costs for designed landscapes can be exponentially high and hardy, native landscapes like the camas meadows may reduce those costs over time once these plants are established. Combined with increasing public and campus-wide participation through educational programming, labor costs around management may be monitored to see if they see a significant drop as well.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

The impacts of this project will be measured primarily in three ways:

Scientific Knowledge / The empirical research conducted through monitoring the establishment and survivability of this habitat type in an urban condition in relation to a variety of management strategies will serve to benefit the establishment of this habitat type in other urban areas and long term management. As a culturally significant landscape type, this impact not only enhances our ecological understanding, it deepens our cultural connection to the landscape.

Educational Outcomes / Most directly, this project will provide five students with the opportunities to work on a project of scientific and design inquiry, to collect, analyze, and synthesize findings, and identify strategies for communicating these findings. Approaches to measure other educational impacts will emerge, and be related to the development and deployment of interpretive strategies for the visitors of the Burke Museum and UW campus.

Financial Savings / A direct impact of this research will be to identify management approaches that streamline the labor necessary to care for this project as it matures. In an effort to identify adaptive pathways to balance ecological health and maintenance cost

Total amount requested from the CSF: $21,720
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Camas Meadows Project Budget Proposal
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal CostNotes
Student (Hourly)$24.24 (21.2% load rate)715$17,331Student hourly combined with load rate and multiplied by 715 total hours in a 3 year duration. Average student hours per week is between 8-10 hours.
Faculty (Summer Support)$1,239 (23.9% load rate)1$1,239
Field Equipment$2501$250Field-based research equipment
Public Field Days$1506$900Rentals
Interpretive Strategy Development$1,5001$1,500Construction costs
Management Report and Management Plan$5001$500Printing and Publication Fees

Non-CSF Sources:

Camas Meadows In-kind Support
SourceAmount (Hourly)HoursTotal
In-kind (Public volunteers)$18240 $4,320
In-kind (UW Grounds)$4030 $1,200
In-kind (Stakeholders)$6075$4,500
Project Completion Total: $21,720

Timeline:

Camas Meadows Project Timeline
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Stakeholder Meetings ½ day, 2X annually September 2022
Research Methods Development 2 months (annual review) August 2020
Field Monitoring April to September annually September 2022
Student-led Work Days 1 day, 3X annually September 2022
Interpretation Collaboration (with Burke and Intellectual House) Ongoing, 2020 - 2022 September 2022
Create Management Plan 3 months September 2022
Dissemination of Findings Ongoing, 2020 - 2022 December 2022

Project Approval Forms:

Fresh Food Recovery for the UW Food Pantry

Executive Summary:

Breakdown for this funding request is as follows:The UW Food Pantry is a flagship project of the Any Hungry Husky Initiative, which works to address food insecurity on the University of Washington-Seattle Campus. The Food Pantry provides foodstuffs such as canned goods, grains, fresh produce, and ready-to-eat meals free of charge to any Husky Card-holding student, staff member, or faculty member. The Food Pantry is currently undergoing a phase of rapid growth: in the last 24 months, total visits have increased over 500% from 748 visits in the 2017-18 academic year to 3,845 in the first two quarters of the 2019-20 year. This improvement is significant, but there is still a great deal of unmet need: a 2018 study conducted by UW faculty members suggested that approximately 20% of students had experienced food insecurity in the 12 months preceding the study. 

Shelf-stable food available to Pantry users is primarily sourced from bulk purchases funded by donated funds, as well as corporate and private donations. However, the Food Pantry is presently expanding efforts to ‘glean’ recently-expired or unneeded produce and ready-to-eat meals from on-campus locations including the dining halls, the UW Farm, the District Market, and the Nook. By rescuing food that would otherwise be disposed of, the Food Pantry is able to feed community members in need while diverting food from the waste system.  Food sent to landfill and compost, produces methane as a by-product and contributes to climate change. In 2018, the UW estimated that its operations resulted in the compost of 1.7 million pounds and the landfill of 1.3 million pounds of food, while only about 15,000 pounds were rescued or donated. Although not all of this food is suitable for gleaning (e.g. health codes generally prohibit the donation of hot food tray leftovers) the sheer scale of these numbers make it clear that the gleaning program has a great deal of room for expansion. 

In order to grow the Food Pantry’s gleaning initiative, funding for two key resources must be secured: the Pantry requires both an expanded capacity for cold food storage and the continuation of a currently-existing staff position to implement and nurture the gleaning program. Presently, the Pantry’s ability to glean food is limited by the amount of cold storage space available; the 18 cubic feet of storage our current fridge provides is no longer sufficient to store all the refrigerable goods we glean, nor does it hold enough food to provide all of our visitors with fresh produce and meals on a daily basis. A new refrigerator would allow us to store more fresh food for longer periods of time, improving the Pantry’s ability to provide visitors with nutrient-dense food while allowing us to divert a greater amount of food from landfill/compost destinations to individuals who need it. 

The University of Washington Food Pantry therefore requests $35,000 of funding from the Campus Sustainability Fund for the purpose of funding the continuation of a gleaning coordinator position as well as the purchase and installation of new refrigeration. The funding of these two key resources will help prevent thousands of pounds of food from going to waste annually while providing Huskies with safe and enjoyable sources of nutrition. 

Funding Information

The following provides additional context about our funding request that is not captured in other parts of this request.

Breakdown Total
Gleaning coordinator salary $17.00/hr x 15 hr/wk x 52 wk/year x 20.9% benefit load $13,260 wages, $2,771 benefits = $16,031.00
New cold storage purchase - two refrigeration units $2,299 + $1,019 x 10.1% sales tax + $250 delivery and misc $3,904.00
Farm and Pantry supplies  Compostable produce bags and transport bags, twist ties, rubber bands, thermometers, etc.  $1,000.00
Retrofitting of facilities  To be determined  $14,056.00
TOTAL   $35,000.00

 

We are currently awaiting feedback from the UW facilities team in regards to any mechanical, electrical or infrastructure adjustments that would need to be made for the addition of the cold storage. Adjustments could include reflooring an area of the Pantry so as to not have the fridges stand on carpet, or rewiring the electrical details to account for additional power needs. The Pantry would return any unused funding as soon as we confirm that there would be no unexpected costs in installing the refrigerator, and are prepared to give a more exact number for our request at the time of our presentation to the CSF board after we received estimates on expected work. Other sources currently funding the Food Pantry include $34,065 from the Services and Activities Fee Committee for the purpose of funding wages for two Pantry interns and two Pantry staff members, and an estimated balance of $56,600 in the Husky Hunger Relief Fund for the purpose of food and operating expenses. This fund is discretionary as it is donor supported, and is what the Pantry currently uses for food purchases, miscellaneous operating expenses, and would utilize for the gleaning coordinator position if alternate funding can not be secured. We are requesting funding from the CSF as a grant status and would not intend to pay back the grant. 

 

Student Involvement:

First and foremost, students are involved in the project at the most basic level - they make up roughly 99% of visits at the Food Pantry. In addition, the position of gleaning coordinator is a student-run position. The continuation of the position would allow for hands on learning for the gleaning coordinator as well as the opportunity to lead teams of student volunteers in gleaning based projects. The Pantry itself is also student-run, having both student staff and student volunteers, and exists to be a resource for students as well as other campus members. The continuation of the gleaning position gives a student the possibility to have an impact on the food system within UW, as well as the lives of other Huskies. With the addition of more refrigeration, the gleaning coordinator would be able to increase gleaning capacity, ultimately increasing the amount of food available to Pantry visitors as well as expanding upon the scope of food rescue possible on campus. The Food Pantry introduced the gleaning coordinator position as a pilot project in 2019; the success of this position has rendered it  integral to the ability of the Pantry to serve its audience and expand its operations. Student staff and volunteers work in the Pantry everyday that it is open, but no extra student volunteers will need to be recruited at this time for this project.

Education & Outreach:

To ensure the UW community can find out about our project, the Pantry will be posting on both of our social media sites about the funding award as well as in our e-newsletter sent out to Pantry shoppers and subscribers. In addition to these announcements, we would also make a page on the Food Pantry website dedicated to announcing the funding award and maintaining gleaning updates every quarter to demonstrate the funding being put to use. Additionally, as has happened in the past, food-relevant classes can learn about the Food Pantry in class as a campus resource, food system, or however else it would fit into the course curriculum. Further campus support can be seen in the attached Project Support Forms from the UW Farm, HFS, and Student Life.

Environmental Impact:
  • Food
  • Waste
  • Environmental Justice
  • Social Justice
Project Longevity:

f granted the CSF funding, we would anticipate receiving the funds in June. Funding for the gleaning position would be implemented right away since the position is currently filled, and the new cold storage would be ordered at that time as well. While waiting for the fridges to be delivered (estimated at two to four weeks), the Pantry would perform any retrofitting to the space deemed necessary by the internal facilities team, and aim to have the fridges set up and running by mid August. The team assigned to this project would consist of the Pantry staff as well as already established Pantry volunteers if needed. The project is just short of being “shovel-ready”; all that would be needed is the reorganization of the current Pantry furniture to accommodate the new fridges, as well as the determination of any wiring adjustments needed for a commercial refrigerator.

The long-term funding of the gleaning coordinator is still to be dertimined.  After the FY2021 we will pursue funding support from organizations like CSF and SAF, as well as off campus grant opportunities.  There is also interest from donors for this position which creates an additional potential revenue source to support this position in the long term. Once the refrigiration units are purchased the maintenence can be worked into the annual Pantry operations budget. 

 

Environmental Problem:

The Current Problem

The UW campus prides itself on being a leader in sustainability efforts, and our minimal waste ideology is a large part of said efforts. The Food Pantry supports minimal waste through the rescue and diversion of leftover food from compost or landfill and instead to students who would not otherwise be able to afford it. Diverting food from landfill to the hands of hungry students is important because it provides  food for students, staff and teachers struggling with food insecurity issues and it reduces methane gas which is generated by landfill. 

 

There are currently two challenges facing the Pantry.  The first challenge is to acquire funding to extend the grant funded Gleaning coordinator position past the deadline. Currently, the part-time (15-17 hrs weekly) gleaning coordinator oversees gleaning, or the collection of unconsumed food, from multiple dining locations around campus. The coordinator also trains volunteers, acts as the main contact point for donating organizations and helps promote the organization through social media.  Just this week the coordinator was able to step in and help the two remaining UW Farm staff with picking, washing and packing the produce to ensure that the Pantry would receive a share of the fresh produce. If the coordinator was not able to assist with the process, all the food on the farm not going to HFS would have been composted due to a lack of staff.  

 

The second challenge is adequate refrigeration space for the current supply of donated food and additional space needed for the upcoming fresh produce season.  Currently, we are able to store our gleaned food in our household refrigerator and we have been granted temporary access to a fridge at the By George Cafe for the duration of spring quarter due to COVID-19 closures. This extra bit of storage has proved extremely useful as we have been able to accept more gleaning donations as well as make less trips back and forth across campus and can simply restock from the By George fridge. This is a temporary fix and can help with the current volume but will not be enough to help during the extremely busy fresh produce farm season in summer and fall.

 

The Food Pantry has a strong partnership with the UW Farm, which delivers farm-fresh, organic produce on a weekly basis that we would not be able to purchase from the stores we order our bulk goods from. Refrigerating the produce helps prolong freshness and nutrient density, especially in the upcoming warm months of the year when produce will be at peak production. Due to the limited capacity of the current fridge, the Farm produce frequently ends up kept out at room temperature because of the prioritization of other items such as sandwiches with meat and dairy, ultimately ensuring that the produce will have a shorter shelf life. The refrigerator model we are hoping to purchase has a clear door which would allow for a visually pleasing display of the produce, making it more likely that Pantry visitors choose nutritious, fresh options over shelf-stable alternatives. 

 

In addition to the storage of fresh produce, insufficient fridge storage means that the Pantry sometimes needs to decline donated food requiring refrigeration simply because we do not have the space to store the food. This leads to food that could have been offered to students needing to be thrown away or diverted elsewhere simply because of storage limits. Unfortunately our current fridge is a household refrigerator, not a commercial one, and almost half of the unit is a freezer which we are unable to utilize for produce. The change from our current unit to an all fridge unit would result in an increase from a total of 18 cubic feet of fridge space to a total of 82 cubic feet of cold storage. 

 

It is the mission of the Food Pantry to provide food assistance to students, staff, and faculty who for whatever reason are struggling to put food on their plate. Food insecurity is directly addressed through our no-cost, no-questions-asked model as well as the numerous support services we partner with and can direct students to. Food insecurity is negatively correlated with student success, and redirecting neglected food to campus community members addresses both hunger and health through nutrition, relieving strain on the hunger portion of a struggling Husky’s life and allowing them to focus their efforts on other pressing priorities.

How The Project Addresses the Problem

By extending the gleaning coordinator position and acquiring an additional refrigeration unit,  the Pantry will be able to serve more students, staff and teachers dealing with food insecurity issues.  The Pantry will not have the problem of turning down food that needs refrigeration and will be able to keep the donated food fresher longer.  The Food Pantry is able to assist in the sustaining of education through dependable access to food at no cost. The Pantry also provides the opportunity for campus members to know where their food is coming from, specifically the UW Farm and campus eateries, while supporting waste diversion. Subsequently, the gleaning coordinator position provides valuable hands-on experience regarding food waste and how to manage cross-campus food operations.We currently glean from dining locations out of the 30+ on campus, but with additional funding and space, we would work towards maximizing our gleaning reach to include as many locations as possible. 

 

We can be sure that with the increase in food recovery, the food will be put to good use and that there will not be a gap in supply and demand through the Pantry business model. Pantry shoppers' weekly allotment is dependent on how much product we have; when there is more product, we have lower fewer limits on abundant product, and when there is not enough, we impose more limits to spread the supply. This type of negative feedback system allows for us to buffer the provisions and make sure there is enough for everyone while also ensuring that there is never food leftover at the end of the day. Ready-to-eat food is almost always the first to go, especially when the limits are high. In the month of March 2020, the Pantry gleaned 572 lbs of food from HFS and the UW Farm alone, which is a significant increase from March 2019, when we gleaned 422 lbs from HFS and UW Farm. 

 

Since gleaning is not an exact science, we cannot predict how much food is gleaned from week to week. However, as of recently, the Pantry has been averaging around 150 people a week. Since February 2019, the UW Food Pantry has redistributed over 3618 lbs of gleaned food to put in the hands of food insecure students. This is 3618 pounds of food from Center Table, The Nook, the UW Farm, Suzzallo and the HUB Starbucks, and City Grind Espresso that would otherwise have been thrown away. In addition, the 2019-2020 school year (we are including summer 2019 in this calculation), the UW Food Pantry so far has had over 2,535 visits from shoppers—all of whom are UW students, staff, or faculty. In 2017-2018 alone, the UW Food Pantry had 748 shopper visits. This means the number of visits from the 2017-18 school year have over tripled compared to the 2019-20 school year. This upward trend of visitors is no doubt related to awareness about the Pantry since opening, but also due to the ability of the Pantry to provide for its visitors, which can be built upon by the continued gleaning and the improvement of our cold capacity storage. 

 

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

This project's impacts will be measured by the increased amount of food storage and delivery allowed at one time, which will be tracked through the gleaning sheet kept on-site at the Food Pantry where we track source, type, temperature, and weight of food. We will also be able to monitor total gleaned food from campus, with the goal of expanding gleaning to other locations on campus. Despite the COVID-19 closure mandates, we have already had an influx of dining establishments on campus indicating that once they open back up, they would like to initiate gleaning partnerships with the Food Pantry. Additionally, data will be calculated to determine what percentage of Pantry visitors are accessing gleaned food to assess the popularity and necessity of the gleaning program, and to demonstrate the impact of the project.

Total amount requested from the CSF: $35,000
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
Gleaning coordinator salary16,031.00116,031.00
1x 1-door refrigerator and 1x 2-door refrigerator3,904.0013,904.00
Compostable produce bags and transport bags, twist ties, rubber bands, thermometers, etc. 1,00011,000.00
Retrofitting of Pantry - Labor14,056.00114,056.00

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Install of new cold storage1-2 months August 1
Continue gleaning coordinator1 dayJuly 1, 2020
Estimate from UW facilities 30 daysMay 15, 2020
Retrofitting complete 1-2 monthsAugust 1

3D Printer Material Recycling Program

Executive Summary:

The ubiquity of 3D printers on campus has created a large source of plastic waste that the City of Seattle has decided won’t be recycled at their facilities (
https://twitter.com/SeattleSPU/status/775753287232475136), meaning all 3D printing waste generated at the University of Washington goes straight to a landfill. The project proposed here is designed to create a 3D printer material recycling program that all offices, laboratories, and communal spaces at the University of Washington can benefit from to redirect a large amount of this waste back into usable material. 

This project will be located primarily at the makerspace, Area 01, in Maple Hall. This location is the site of our collaborators, Precious Plastic, who already own Filabot extruder and custom made plastics shredder. Precious Plastic (https://www.preciousplastic-usa.com/) works to collect, recycle, and redistribute bulk plastic that would normally end up in a landfill. Because of the highly precise requirements of filament used for 3D printing, our project will focus on carefully screening the input material and carefully controlling the fabrication of recycled filament. This niche recycling is why our proposed project will complement the work Precious Plastic is doing by offering an alternate output for recycled plastic. The creation of usable filament will also incentivize groups to contribute recyclable material as they will be eligible to receive a percentage of usable material in return.

This collaboration will help reduce our operating cost by reducing the amount of expensive equipment this project will need to order. There will be recycling consumables, outreach materials, and salaries totaling about $9000 for the initialization phase and day-to-day workflow for the academic year afterward. Once this project is funded and out of the initialization phase, it will be able to smoothly run for as long as there is a small amount of support funding and student interested in participating in this project.

Student Involvement:

Although this project is being initiated by Lydia Smith who is the lab manager for the Amy Orsborn lab in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department, all subsequent members and collaborators of this project will be either graduate or undergraduate students at the University of Washington. Lydia’s role will be limited to the initialization of the project, an approximately 6 month, or 2 quarter period. Starting in the fall of 2020, Augusto Millevolte will be a first-year graduate student in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department and will be assisting in getting the project off the ground, helping with outreach, training of new students, and fabrication of recycled materials. Given the demands of graduate students, his role will also be limited to the initial 6 months of the project.

Starting in the summer of 2020, we will be heavily recruiting undergraduate students to participate in this project. As this project will be collaborating with Precious Plastics, who are housed in the Maple Hall Makerspace, Area 01, we will have access to the population of undergraduate students who either work or utilize the resources there. In addition, we will be posting to the University’s Undergraduate Research Program Database (https://www.washington.edu/undergradresearch/students/find/) to solicit interest in students who wish to work on this project. Initial undergraduate students brought on during the summer of 2020 will be a part of the initialization of the project and will spend a large amount of their early time in Fall 2020 with the project learning how to run the machinery from the members of Precious Plastic, keep detailed and informative records of materials and training documentation, as well as collecting and processing the primary material. Once the project is out of the initialization stage, these undergraduate students will be responsible for running day to day operations as well as training more junior students to supplement their workload and eventually replace them.

Students involved with this project will be tasked with any of the following duties including designing/posting posters/flyers about services this project provides, answering emails sent to a project-specific email, bringing collection materials (bags, labels etc) to requesting groups, bringing donated materials to the project office, sorting/cleaning donated materials, maintaining donation records, processing & recycling materials, and handling returns of purchased materials.

 

Education & Outreach:

One of the ways we will looking to help support this project is by applying for work study to financially support the undergraduate researcher. Use of work study funds presumes that students will "learn work skills that are transferable to future career paths". As part of this project, students will primarily learn about project management, recycling pipelines, and 3D printing.

In order to give back to the community, the members of this project will not only be involved in all of the tasks mentioned in "Student Involvement"  but may also volunteer to speak about the project at events such as orientations or ‘trash talks’ given by Waste Management and sustainability groups on campus. Collaborating with Waste Management on UW campus will be the most important part of networking the project can do as they already have a large number of collaborations for recycling in the community and can reach an even larger audience. This collaboration will give us access to email lists and newsletters where we can electronically distribute information about our project.

In order to get as much participation as possible for this project, it will also be important to circulate posters and emails about our services to a broad audience on campus. Despite living in the digital age, posters advertising talks, research opportunities, and services on campus are still widely circulated on corkboards in all buildings (dorms, offices, laboratories, hospitals) on campus and are therefore be an important audience to reach.

One key feature of this project is it will generate a large amount of useable material from all the recycled filament created. Material created will be distributed through 3 sources: 1) Distributed back to labs, officies, groups that donate maters, 2) sold to anyone on campus for a discounted price, and 3) donated to local makerspaces and libraries to improve education about 3D printing to a wider audience. Donating this material will support underrepresented and underprivileged groups' ability to become involved in 3D printing.

Environmental Impact:
  • Waste
Project Longevity:

Ideally, this project should be able to run indefinitely so long as there is a small flow of funding available. As the project is ramping up, there will need to be a lot of oversight of the project to get it fully functional. There will need to be a large amount of community outreach to establish relationships with maker spaces and labs on campus to set up sources of recyclable materials. There will also be a lot of work to set up the workspace and create safety guidelines and operating procedures as well. Once these relationships and documents are developed most will only need to be updated infrequently. After this, the current employees would only have to spend the majority of their time on the day-to-day operations of the project, focusing on record-keeping, collecting recyclable materials, processing the materials into usable filaments, and redistributing the newly created materials. The more streamlined functionality of the project will allow more senior members to train new junior members. This will keep the project running even after the initial students' employees graduate. With only a small amount of funding to sustain employee salaries and operating costs, after establishment, the project will be able to carry on for many years to come even with student workers graduating. This would only cost about ~$1600/quarter (assuming $16/hour, 5hours/week, and 9weeks/quarter. This is expected to increase as Washington state minimum wage laws increase with the cost of living) to have two undergraduate students managing the equipment and outreach of the program after the initial 6-month initialization phase of the project. We will also submit this undergraduate position as a work-study position, applying for federal funding to help supplement the salary costs of the undergraduates working for this project. Assuming continued funding and generated income from the sale of the recycled materials, we will be able to continue this project so long as we can find willing participants for this project.

Environmental Problem:

Given the ubiquity of 3D printers on campus and the high amount of waste generated, this project seeks to create a small space where any office, classroom, or lab on campus can bring their excess/waste filament to be ground down, melted, and spooled into usable filament for future projects. Recycling the material on campus would reduce the amount of material that ended up in landfills and would also reduce the amount of new product that needed to be ordered. As the 3D filament is not commonly found in brick-and-mortar stores, all of it is purchased online (usually from Amazon) involving the manufacturing and shipping of all materials to campus. As this project will generate usable filament, we plan on giving back a portion of recycled material to donors to incentivize participation. All of the remaining filament generated will be donated or sold at a steep discount to groups on campus or in the community that may not be able to easily afford their own material. This would allow underrepresented and underprivileged groups to have the ability to become involved in 3D printing in cases where material cost may have been prohibitive.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Due to the nature of this project it will be easy to quantify the impact this project has on the environment. As previously mentioned, there are numerous sources of waste associated with 3D printing and because current, widely-available recycling focuses on commonly used plastic and 3D printed materials are commonly excluded. In fact Seattle Public Utilities publicly stated all 3D printed material should be thrown into the garbage and they would not be accepting them as compostables or recyclables. This project would be directly siphoning material out of the landfill and back into the production process. We will be able to quantify the amount of material saved from landfills by weighing the shredded material before it is recycled into usable filament. As more makerspaces and labs

Total amount requested from the CSF: $8,910
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Project Budget
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
Outreach Materials per quarter1004400
Recycling Materials per pound1050500
Project Manager Salary per quarter (assuming $25/hour, 5 hours/week, 9 weeks/quarter)112522250
Student Salary per quarter (assuming $16/hour, 5 hours/week, and 9 weeks/quarter)72085760

Non-CSF Sources:

non -CSF funding
SourceAward ($)/quarterQuantity
Work Study Funds5406
Project Completion Total: $8,910

Timeline:

Project Timeline
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Posting position, interviewing, hiring undergraduate student.1 quarter.August 21, 2020
Designing, ordering, posting outreach materials1 quarterAugust 21, 2020
Purchasing recycling materials2 weeksJuly 3, 2020
Establishment of project space and development of training/safety materials1 quarterAugust 21, 2020
Collecting and processing materials from Fall Quarter1 quarterDecember 11, 2020
Collecting and processing materials from Winter Quarter1 quarterMarch 12, 2021
Collecting and processing materials from Spring Quarter1 quarterJune 4, 2021

Food System Coalition Campus-Wide Dolores Documentary Screening

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Electrochromic Glazing System for UW Health Sciences Education Building

Executive Summary:

Project Summary

 

In order to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050 and to respond to the climate change emergency, it is necessary for University of Washington to invest in new building technologies that can reduce building energy consumption while at the same time improving the student experience and supporting the institutional mission of the University. Currently, the University is in the planning and design process for a new Health Sciences Education Building (HSEB) located on NE Pacific St. on the South end of campus, which will serve students, faculty and staff for generations.

 

A relatively new technology, the electrochromic window (ECW) is being considered for a number of the teaching spaces. This technology aims to reduce energy consumption, increase visual and thermal comfort, and reduce maintenance over the life of the building. Like self-tinting prescription glasses, ECWs are an optical glazing (window) technology by which the visible and solar transmittance of a window can be controlled between a transparent state to a very darkened state thus providing a range of visible light transmittances (Tvis) and solar heat gain coefficients (SHGC) when modulated by a control system and sensors to adjust to climate conditions.

 

This proposal requests a total of $65,000 from CSF to fund three project components: (1) an initial feasibility and evaluation phase for two students to work with the UW Project Development Group and the Miller Hull Partnership (leading the design team) to assess the technology and evaluate its potential impacts ($6,000); (2) to fund a portion of the incremental cost (added cost beyond conventional windows) of installing the ECWs at the HSEB (approximately $45,000) ; and (3) student labor to provide education, outreach, and post occupancy evaluation and storytelling about the technology ($14,000). If, after the initial feasibility phase, the design team or the UW Project Development Group elects not to incorporate ECWs the balance of the funding will be returned to CSF.

 

Furthermore, the process of design and evaluation of ECWs and dynamic shading systems will be incorporated into a UW course (ARCH 535) offered in by a faculty member in the College of Built Environments during spring quarter during the duration of the project.

 

If funded, this project will contribute to UW campus sustainability by maximizing energy performance, and improving the classroom experience while showcasing new building envelope technology that sets new sustainability standards on campus.

Student Involvement:

Student Involvement

 

This project will be entirely student-led, with guidance and collaboration from the HSEB design team (Miller Hull Partnership and PAE Engineering), the UW Project Development Group, and a faculty member in the Department of Architecture. The initial feasibility phase will be completed by two UW Department of Architecture, Master of Architecture students, Connor Beck and Ben-Hsin Dow. Both are currently employed at the UW Integrated Design Lab (UW IDL) working in the area of building performance and they will be offered on-going IDL computing and space resources to complete this work. This will include life cycle cost assessment of the technology from reduced energy consumption and potentially reduced cooling equipment sizing.

 

The project leads will seek out stakeholder students via the Department of Health Sciences Administration to get user feedback on the proposed technology. Due to the timeline of the project (expected completion in 2022) current students involved in the project may be required recruit future students to complete outreach, communications and awareness-building activities.

 

Visual displays and interactive media will be exhibited in indoor public spaces incorporating the data storage and trending capabilities of the ECW control system.  

Education & Outreach:

Education & Outreach

 

The evaluation of and incorporation of a new technology for a future teaching facility offers a number of educational an outreach benefits. First, it will provide the opportunity to include UW students in the decision-making process inherent in evaluating a new technology for the Campus. This will provide hands-on engagement in life-cycle-cost assessment where critical issues of user experience, energy performance, and operations and maintenance are evaluated. The findings from this process will inform future projects at UW and will be incorporated in the outreach and education component. Once the project is constructed, students will have the experience of a new type of classroom experience using the dynamic glazing to improve their comfort and the classroom experience.  This project will offer an opportunity to develop messaging and storytelling via visual displays and/or interactive media that is exhibited in indoor public spaces and shares energy-savings and other aspects of the design. Specific strategies for community engagement will be established in the initial phase of the project, depending on the interactive feedback capabilities of the specific ECW system.

 

Concurrent with the design process students in the College of Built Environments will have the opportunity to learn more about ECWs and the project development process for the HSEB in a course, ARCH 535: Daylighting Design taught by Associate Professor Christopher Meek, with assistance from Connor Beck and Ben-Hsin Dow, the students participating in the CSF-funded project.

Environmental Impact:
  • Energy Use
  • Community Development
Project Longevity:

Project Longevity

 

The ECWs will be designed with the intent of serving for the design life of the building enclosure. EC glazing is rated for at least a 25 years and will be covered with basic warranty guaranteed in the contract with the contractor. Though the system will require a control system and localized occupant control switching. Other than managing and maintaining a commercially available control system, we do not anticipate significant additional operation and maintenance cost.

 

In the unlikely event of a total system failure, the “failure mode” of the ECW system will revert to act as convention double pane, clear glass. This system would appear similar to standard glass in the rest of the building. If this happened, the installation of conventional blinds or shade would likely be required.

Environmental Problem:

Sustainability Challenge

 

In order to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050 and to respond to the climate change emergency, it is necessary for University of Washington to invest in new building technologies that can reduce building energy consumption while at the same time improving the student experience and supporting the institutional mission of the University. Buildings are responsible for over 40% of carbon emissions in the United States. Building heating, cooling, and ventilation (HVAC) and lighting use well over 50% of Campus building energy. Electrochromic windows have the potential to reduce energy consumption in all of these areas and potentially reduce the cost and size of building mechanical systems when incorporated as part of an integrated design process.

 

ECWs are an optical glazing (window) technology by which the visible and solar transmittance of a window can be controlled between a transparent state to a very darkened state thus providing a range of visible light transmittances (Tvis) and solar heat gain coefficients (SHGC) when modulated by a control system and sensors to adjust to climate conditions. By dynamically responding to local climate and immediate solar conditions, as well as real-time internal conditions within a building, electrochromic windows control the amount of heat and light emerging a space, while reducing glare and improving access to views outside.  EC glazing is made five layers of ceramic material coated onto a pane of glass.  A small electrical current is sent through the ceramic coating which causes lithium ions to transfer the ceramic layers. The tint within the window pane is the result of this process.  Reversing the direction of the polarity allows the window pane to clear.  Window tint percentage can range anywhere between 0% and 99% for increased glare and heat control.  The tint system may be occupant controlled or set to automation using a control system in which the system can be intelligently optimized to reduce heat and glare issues. The inclusion of ECWs can eliminate the requirement for mechanical building blinds or shades, facilitating glare control and space darkening for audio visual displays.

 

In a study conducted by Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, ECWs have shown measured building cooling load reductions of 19-26% and lighting power savings of 48%-67% when combined with photo-responsive lighting controls. The saving potential varies by building type, use, and climate zone, due to variability in heating and cooling loads, solar exposure and glare control requirements. For this reason ECWs are frequently modulated by controls that adjust visible and solar transmittances by window or facade to reduce whole building energy consumption and maintain visual comfort.

 

More importantly, and number of studies, most notably by Lisa Heschong with the Heschong Mahone Group, have correlated access to daylight and views with significant improvements in student learning. A growing body of photo-biological research shows that occupants experience many positive physiological results when being exposed to natural daylight and to outdoor view.  Naturally-lit environment has values of triggering positive responses within human’s endocrine system. Wellness benefits are range from mental clarity, visual acuity, or even regulation of body system for better sleep. Although traditional blinds or curtains also provide lighting autonomy to the occupants, typically the devices are regularly left closed for extended periods, which results in reduced access to daylight and view. The weather-responsive controlling mechanism and the flexible light transmittance of EC glazing exclude the concerns led by manual-control operation, and potentially reduce the cost of maintenance.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Measuring Impacts

 

The primary impacts are to implement and demonstrate a new sustainability technology in a prominent student-focused building on Campus.  Estimates show that EC glass reduce building energy consumption loads by about 20%.  Maximizing natural light and minimizing heat and glare allows students and workers to function at a higher level with less fatigue and eye strain. Workers in buildings with optimized tint control reported a 56% decrease in drowsiness throughout the work day which leads to a more productive and attentive population of students.

 

The long-term scope of the project may require a post-occupancy questionnaire and will require data collection from the system to evaluate impacts and tell the story of the system as part of the demonstration. This would be done in coordination with the UW Office of Sustainability.

Total amount requested from the CSF: $65,000
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
Incremental Capital Cost45000145000
Student salaries (feasibility)300026000
Student salaries (edu/outreach)7000214000

Non-CSF Sources:

TBD
Project Completion Total: $145,000

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Phase I1 year2020
Phase II1-3 years2022
Phase III1 year2022

Student Sustainability Forum

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Africa Now Conference [Virtual]

Executive Summary:

The African continent is home to the largest youth population in the world. With the increased access to information and new platforms to mobilize, youth across the continent are fighting to address corruption and create ways to contribute to the growth of their specific country. This revolution is one that cannot be ignored; the African continent has abundant resources and limitless potential that generally goes unacknowledged and continues to be exploited by outside actors. Africa’s youth across the diaspora are eager to help their nations achieve the long-overdue potential that experts have been predicting for decades. Here in Washington, we’ve decided to join the revolution by supplementing the educational pursuits of young professionals and cultivating them to unlock the future of Africa, now.

Inspired by the Green New Deal’s efforts to address climate change and economic inequality; two problems disproportionality affecting Black and African peoples across the globe, Africa Now conference seeks to make its 2020 conference a point of intervention. With the youth of the world working tirelessly to let the institutional powers that be understand that the future is not only now but us, this conference will serve as a place for collective action.

This year our theme is Achieving a Sustainable Future - our goal is to highlight the importance of environmental sustainability in local and global African communities 

 This encompasses looking at sustainability through a holistic lens, an approach that we believe aligns with the CSF’s efforts in expanding the scope of sustainability.

 

Africa Now defines sustainability as addressing the environmental, economic, social, and political aspects of Africa’s continued growth. This year, our theme is centered around environmental sustainability. We want to analyze and identify practical solutions for environmental sustainability through the lens of  politics, business, education, media and technology. Our holistic approach to environmental sustainability also takes into account that black and African communities bear the brunt of climate change. 

Africa Now is seeking $20,500 from the Campus Sustainability Fund to assist in organizing our third annual conference to inspire young Black students and professionals to join the movement for sustainable, afrocentric, African development. By tapping into the network of young, Black students and professionals in Washington, we can bring together an interdisciplinary group of driven individuals to evaluate how our skills can play a role in the sustainable growth of our common, ancestral homeland.

 

The Africa NOW Conference -- hosted and organized in collaboration with the African Student Association, Black Student Union, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, and other student organizations -- brings together over 200, young, Black students and professionals. The conference provides them with the insights, knowledge, and resources necessary to envision sustainable ways to improve their communities in Seattle, Africa, and across the Diaspora. Through an all-star panel, dynamic breakout sessions, and networking, we’ll inspire and equip young Black professionals to fight for a sustainable future for Africa. This will be held on the UW Seattle campus.

Student Involvement:

From its inception, the vision of the Africa Now Conference has been driven and realized by students. After two annual conferences and a transition to a non-profit, this still remains true. The Africa Now Conference is entirely organized by current UW students in the Seattle Area and supported by an alumni who is also the founder of this vision. In regards to student involvement, the Africa Now conference is a think tank full of dedicated students who work to enhance the reach and impact of the conference and one another. Comprised of 11 executive board members, and a team of volunteers, the conference planning committee brings students from a myriad of backgrounds, departments and student organizations who are all committed to fulfilling the demands of the conference.

The most important approach for ensuring that UW students are interested in attending the conference is for it to be organized by students. Because the organizing board is composed of students from all academic and experiential backgrounds, it is aware of the general interests and concerns that our peers share; this allows us to target speakers, facilitators, and resources that can best address those needs. Given the success of the past 2 years, the Africa Now conference saw a significant increase in students interested in getting involved in the conference again. The level of interest required the Program Directors to institute an application process to select this year’s organizing board; and like every aspect of the conference the selection process is also conducted be fellow students who have dedicated their time and effort to the purpose of Africa Now.

Understanding that there is a need to be organized and direct in assembling the organizing board, not all students are able to be selected. However, the Africa Now conference realizes that all students who express an interest in having a direct involvement with the conference are able to provide a myriad of resources and abilities that can also serve well on the day of the conference if they choose. All previous applicants are contacted by the organizing board to gather student volunteers for lead up events and the day of the conference. Recruitment for volunteers is not only done by the conference’s board members but in collaboration with the black organizations both on and off campus that we work with throughout the entire process.

Beyond serving as organizers or volunteers, the best way for students to get involved in the Africa Now Project is by attending the conference itself. The conference will be a great opportunity for students to learn about afrocentric, sustainable development projects and how to be involved in making that a reality. Despite the afrocentric nature of this event, the strategies and tactics of the conference can be applied to communities and countries that do not belong to the African diaspora. As such, Africa Now will seek to reach out to FIUTS, FASA, MEChA and other student organizations that serve students and communities of color. These groups could not only explore strategies for sustainable development, but they could also learn how to be better allies for Black/African people.

Education & Outreach:

Education, outreach and behavioral changes are at the center of the Africa Now conference purpose. Because our goal is to educate, organize, and mobilize, the Africa Now conference recognizes that this can only be done through the continued expansion and collaboration between Black and African Organization within the Seattle community, organizations back on the African continent and Africa Now. Each year one of our primary goals is to bolster our networks for the purpose of increasing the number and diversity of our attendees. Continued collaboration between fellow black student organization on the UW campus such as the Black Student Union, African Student Association, the African Studies Department; and non-UW organizations such as Mother Africa allows the Africa Now conference to deliver a holistic education and provision of practical tools that yield changes in our attendees.

At the 2020 conference one of the specific ways we hope to educate conference attendees is through a case competition. Attendees will be presented with real life situations and problems on sustainability (or lack thereof) across the 4 key areas (political, environmental, social, economic) of sustainability in selected groups. Students will, with measured guidance from workshop leaders work in their groups to bring about a resolution and recommendations to the problems they’re assigned. The purpose of this is to increase the engagement and networking potential of the conference but most importantly interact with applicable knowledge. Through this we hope that students will be willing practitioners of the tools and skills they’ll learn at the conference. We believe that beginning the process of applying sustainable practices to real time scenarios will work in changing the attitudes of the students. We understand the propensity for inaction after such events, and the case competition will hopefully place attendees in the space of believing in their ability to be the agents of change needed.

Environmental Impact:
  • Energy Use
  • Food
  • Transportation
  • Waste
  • Water
  • Environmental Justice
  • Community Development
  • Cultural Representation
  • Social Justice
Project Longevity:

The feasibility of this project is best demonstrated by the past two annual Africa Now conferences, which conference attendees rated as a success. The first, which was held in May of 2018 had over 100 registered attendees. In our 2019 conference, we accommodated for over 180 attendees. This year’s planning committee will leverage and build on the experiences of these past two conferences, as well as the feedback from the surveys that our conference attendees completed. For our 2020 conference, we will spotlight the work that has been continued since our last annual conference. 

The organizing board takes seriously the procurement of long term sponsorships and partnerships for the longevity of our conference and mission.  After transitioning into a non-profit organization Africa Now now has access to a pool of potential donors that it had previously been unable to work with. In past years those who expressed an interest in funding the conference were unsure how to proceed after being informed that we lacked the necessary tax write off codes. As we move forward with a fiscal sponsor -Mother Africa, we plan on reaching out and establishing these sponsorships and partnerships. We believe that this strong relationship between Africa Now and its supporting community in the Greater Seattle Area and beyond are what will allow us to continue enriching global perspectives, supporting grassroots efforts across the African diaspora, and providing individuals with the network and resources to tackle problems facing the African continent and its diaspora. 

Environmental Problem:

The central focus of Africa Now is raising a local awareness about the unsustainability of global development projects, especially those taking place in African countries and communities. We want attendees to recognize the unique position of Africans - on the Continent and throughout the diaspora - to play a role in addressing the problems that arise from those projects. Africa Now sees development as having 4 key areas of impact that determines whether or not a project is sustainable: environmental, economic, political, and social. Each of these aspects is important to ensure that projects are truly sustainable for the people, their country, their land, and the world.  While the political and social areas are typically more locally/regionally isolate, the environmental and economic impacts and pressures can be - and typically are - global in nature. 

Our primary goal for the 2020 Africa Now conference is for attendees to have a forum to explore strategies for developing sustainable solutions for their communities throughout the African Diaspora and in Africa within the 4 key areas. The conference will provide attendees learning opportunities, discussion forums, tools and resources that will allow them to leave the conference with actionable solutions they can implement so as to contribute to environmental sustainability in their communities. This year, we plan on incorporating seven separate breakout sessions throughout the conference in order to allow our attendees to learn from individuals who are experts within their fields but also tap into their existing knowledge as a collaborative group. We want to provide new interactive ways for our attendees learn, network, and take action with those who are in these fields and those who are interested in the development of the African continent, and our approach to education, outreach, and behavior changes provide the means to do so. Because our goal is to educate, organize, and mobilize, the Africa Now conference recognizes that this can only be done through the continued expansion and collaboration between Black and African Organization within the Seattle community, organizations back on the African continent and Africa Now. Each year one of our primary goals is to bolster our networks for the purpose of increasing the number and diversity of our attendees. Continued collaboration between fellow black student organization on the UW campus such as the Black Student Union, African Student Association, the African Studies Department; and non-UW organizations such as Mother Africa allows the Africa Now conference to deliver a holistic education and provision of practical tools that yield changes in our attendees.

 

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

The Africa Now views the impact of our conference in two parts- direct sustainable outcomes and the impact on education and behavior changes. Each year the  committee works diligently to ensure that we are not only teaching attendants and our communities sustainable practices but being practitioners of these efforts ourselves. This includes recycling as much of our conference materials as possible and having the conference and all lead up events on the UW campus. Encouraging ridesharing to our events, minimizing hardware advertisements which often require widespread use of paper, and supplementing with a strong online presence as a part of our marketing/advertising also allow us to increase our sustainable impact. Adding modes of trasnportation as a category on our exit surveys will also give us a better understanding of pre-conference impacts that can be used in the future for other purposes such as providing accomodations and increasing our accessibility. Our speakers are often local to Washington state which not only reduces travel costs, but let's our audience know that there are people within their own state, and oftentimes city, who are doing the work that they want to be a part of. In the event that we do have to fly-in a speaker or two, Africa Now plans to mitigate the impact of air pollution by having a tree planting day. We’re currently working on identifying local organizations such as Plant-for-the-Planet Washington to achieve this should we fly-in a speaker.

Our plan for measuring the impact of our conference is through the follow up survey which we have conducted in previous years, as well as connecting with students on the ways they’ve implemented the solutions and recommendations they’ll identify during the case competition (refer to Outreach, Education, and Behavior Change section). We plan on having a spotlight section of the conference which will allow past returning attendees to share the ways they’ve gone about implementing the tools they’ve received at past conferences to measure the impact of our conference.

At the 2020 conference one of the specific ways we hope to educate conference attendees is through a case competition. Attendees will be presented with real life situations and problems on sustainability (or lack thereof) in selected groups. Students will, with measured guidance from workshop leaders work in their groups to bring about a resolution and recommendations to the problems they’re assigned. The purpose of this is to increase the engagement and networking potential of the conference but most importantly interact with applicable knowledge. Through this we hope that students will be willing practitioners of the tools and skills they’ll learn at the conference. We believe that beginning the process of applying sustainable practices to real time scenarios will work in changing the attitudes of the students. We understand the propensity for inaction after such events, and the case competition will hopefully place attendees in the space of believing in their ability to be the agents of change needed.

 

Total amount requested from the CSF: $20,500
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Conference Line Items
Plates and Utensils $200
Conference decor$600
Physical Promo - Video $400
Digital Promo (Website)$1,100
225 Reusable Water Bottles $3,000
Program Booklets $200
Name Tags $100
Media - 2 Photographers & 1 Videographer$2,000
Speakers (7 x ~ $1000)$7,000
Live Entertainment$800
Featured Artists$2,200
Bus Vouchers for Students $250
Stickers - Decale $500
Venue$2,000
Lanyards $150
Total $20,500

Non-CSF Sources:

Sources of funding and sponsorship outside of the CSF
AdditionalSourcesof Funding
ECC Student Event FundAfrican Chamber of CommerceBlacks at MicrosoftAfricans at BoeingAfricans at T-Mobile
VenueFoodFoodFoodAdvertising
Project Completion Total: $28,500

Timeline:

Conference tasks with estimated time frame and completion dates
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Reach Out to SpeakersEarly JanuaryJanuary 14th
Secure SpeakersEarly FebruaryFebruary 10th
Apply For FundsJanuaryFebruary 10th
Organize Lead Up EventsDecember- FebruaryFebruary 28th
Reserve VenueJanuaryJanuary 31st
Book Photographer, Artists, Caterers, etc.FebruaryMarch 1st
Organize Volunteers/ Media OutputMarchMarch 31st
Open RegistrationEarly AprilApril 5th
Registration Period/ Close RegistrationLate AprilApril 28th
Finalize day-of detailsEarly AprilApril 25th
Conference Packet/ DecorLate AprilApril 27th
Analyze Survey DataMid MayMay 20th
Grant ReportingMayMay 31st

Project IF - Phase II

Executive Summary:

Project Indoor Farm (Project IF) is an organization run by students and community members aiming to create a more sustainable campus food system through urban indoor farming. 

We envision three phases of operation for Project IF:

Phase I: Feasibility study (completed in December 2019)

Phase II: Full operation on the University of Washington campus (2020 and on)

Phase III: Transfer the successful experience to other suitable organizations (2022 and on)

In the proposed Phase II operation, Project IF’s goal is to grow leafy greens and herbs for the University of Washington Housing and Food Services – providing locally sourced, sustainably grown produce to dining halls, cafes, and restaurants on campus. Project IF addresses sustainability by helping to eliminate transportation, packaging, and other resources traditionally used when growing and distributing food. Equally important, this project will create a space for students to apply their knowledge and passion from the classroom to our farm directly impacting sustainable urban agriculture. Running day-to-day operations and improving the farm through design projects and research will provide a unique learning opportunity with real world application. Project IF fills the gap of giving a hands-on experience to students within indoor urban agriculture, a rapidly expanding industry that will play an increasingly relevant role in helping feed the world.

The 2020 grant request from the UW CSF will enable Project IF to proceed to Phase II and begin to allocate resources to education. With additional funding, Project IF will build on the Feasibility Study and scale up its farming efforts by expanding the physical farm, paying student staff, and setting aside funding for operational resources, business ventures, and research and design projects. The plan is to have Project IF’s production financially support its educational endeavors. 

Student Involvement:

Student involvement is the key to Project IF’s success. All our activities aim to foster awareness of the strains on our food system. This is not possible without consistent and committed student involvement. To continue incentivizing and engaging as many students as possible, we designed a set of clear metrics to monitor impacts which will help us narrow in our focus. The data we collect will give us the insight to understand Project IF’s social reach and potential to grow on other campuses.

We summarized eight ways for students to get involved with Project IF with varying levels of commitment: 

  1. Produce consumption. The easiest way to be involved and support Project IF is to dine on campus and eat our greens! Students can enjoy fresh, locally grown produce at the HFS-sponsored organizations we will partner with! With virtually zero transportation and waste, this metric demonstrates how sustainability is truly a core value that UW students stand for. 
  2. Website and monthly news. Our outreach team will publish a monthly newsletter about Project IF and other related stories that we think are worth sharing with the student subscribers. Students can subscribe to our monthly newsletter or view it directly on our website. 
  3. Social media. We have accounts on three major social media platforms: Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn. This is another easy way for students to stay in touch and learn how to be further involved in Project IF.
  4. Farm tour. We will routinely host farm tours upon request. In the recent past, we hosted about 2 to 3 tours every month. We expect the frequency to increase by a fair amount once we reach the full operation in Phase II. For those who have hands-on experience, we will also provide an unofficial certificate of urban farm training as a souvenir. 
  5. Student staff. Since Project IF is designed to be student-led with minimal oversight. We expect to have 10 to 15 students trained as paid staff to work at Project IF every year.
  6. Student volunteer program. In addition to the student staff that work at the farm, we will also accept student volunteers to help with various tasks ranging from farm operations to outreach and education.
  7. Independent or capstone projects. We currently have 15 project ideas (with more to come) for students to start working on. With the collaboration of Professor Eli Wheat and Professor Sean McDonald, we hope these project ideas come to fruition. We also encourage students to consult with us on their ideas for possible projects.
  8. Class collaboration. With three class collaborations (ENVIR 240, LARCH 501D, NUTR 303) already in progress for the coming winter and spring quarters, we would love to be part of more courses on campus and share our vision and story. It is another great channel for us to engage and interact with students in depth and potentially recruit more student-staff/volunteers and inspire more independent projects.

We view all aspects of student involvement as part of the impact we make. We will capture the quantitative data for all eight possible ways as part of the measurable metrics of student involvement and its intrinsic social impact.

Education & Outreach:

The core mission of Project IF is to raise awareness on the food ecosystem, both locally and globally. Realizing the problems in the current food system is the first step towards solving the global food crisis and improving our local food ecosystem. Project IF can raise awareness by providing students with locally grown food and encouraging them to question where their meals come from. When students learn that the salad they had for lunch was grown by their classmates, it will spark their curiosity and automatically make them directly involved in the solution. It will also provide students with an example of how their peers dedicate their time to act more sustainably. This dining hall exposure will create a unique platform to highlight Project IF and its mission, leading to more student involvement through online resources, farm tours, and working with our organization. Through this exposure, more people will gain individual insight into what they can do to help to improve the future food system. It’s like planting a seed: once becoming aware, actions are sure to follow. 

In the Phase I feasibility study (2019), Project IF has grown to encompass 15 volunteers who have worked to expand the farm’s operations and outreach. Volunteers have established a formal website (https://projectifuw.wixsite.com/projectif), social media platforms (https://www.instagram.com/projectifuw/) (https://www.facebook.com/projectifuw/) (https://www.linkedin.com/company/project-if-uw/), a user-instruction software called Aquarium (https://www.aquarium.bio), and promotional material such as this video (https://www.instagram.com/p/B4dYGOmlqo1/?hl=en) to attract students to support and even join Project IF.

In recent months, we have had the privilege of meeting with students and faculty members and providing tours of the farm to different classes with the goal of increasing engagement and awareness of the benefits of urban farming on campus.

In our Phase II Education endeavor, we will continue to provide education and research opportunities to students who are interested in learning about indoor urban farming. In the summer of 2019, we collaborated with Professor Gundula Proksch as part of the Global Sustainability Scholars tour in Seattle and partook in the panel discussion with student scholars. Most recently, we have been collaborating with Professor Eli Wheat and Professor Sean McDonald within the Program on the Environment. We will be featured in Dr. Wheat’s ENVIR 240 Urban Farm curriculum this spring and have plans to provide students with the opportunity to conduct a small research project for honors or independent study credit. Project IF will also be listed as an available project in Dr. McDonald’s senior capstone series this upcoming spring. In addition, we will continue to give tours of our farm to classes such as Professor Julie Johnson’s Climate Changed Urban Agriculture studio LARCH 501D and interested student groups. Similarly, we will be presenting in Dr. Yona Sipos’s NUTR 303 Neighborhood Nutrition class and providing in-depth farm tours to their two lab groups in the winter quarter.

We see Project IF as an interdisciplinary endeavor. From agriculture, environmental science, urban planning, and public policy to production planning and logistics, we welcome students from all majors and backgrounds. Our hope is that they can apply their passion to our farm. We would love to see our farm incorporated into the UW’s curriculum and serve as an opportunity for students to apply their learning to shaping the local food system, enriching their experiences at the UW, and ultimately promoting sustainability.

Another form of outreach and education is the relationships Project IF can create with like-minded local organizations. For example, our team has been in contact with Nathan Hale High School. We have reached out to Mr. Matt Davis in hopes of having the opportunity to speak to his students, and working together to expand their extensive urban farm to include an indoor growing unit.

Lastly, Project IF aims to participate in the U-District Farmer’s Market through Seattle Neighborhood Farmers Markets. Increased production capacity gives our team a means to hold a booth every week at the market and provide readily available, sustainable, local produce to the community. This would expand Project IF’s reach beyond the campus to the neighboring communities. 

Environmental Impact:
  • Food
Project Longevity:

·       Hardware Longevity

According to the manufacturer, there are two hardware components, the LED light and the submersible pump, that have a life expectancy of around 10 years. With such information, we don’t expect to run into any hardware longevity issues within our first five years (a very conservative estimation). However, since the light and water are so vital to the success of the indoor farm, we will monitor the equipment closely.

·       Organizational Structure and Management Longevity

We structured Project IF to be a sustainable project with no expiration date. Financially, in 11 months, the operation will reach the cash flow breakeven point. In other words, Project IF will be able to start supporting its educational components, including research and outreach, with the net income (~$150K) generated annually. And in less than three years we can recover all the upfront capital investment ($250K). However, it is not our goal to continuously expand the operation to maximize the financial gain. Our goal is to strike a healthy balance between production (generating revenue) and education (creating impact). Once the balance stage is reached, we will keep the steady operation on both farming production and food education moving forward under the sustainable structure we envision. 

Once the proposed Phase II is proven successful and stable for two years, we plan to start Phase III and reach out to other universities and/or organizations. We will work to transfer our experience to help them create their own version of Project IF in their community. This will be a slow process with many unpredictable challenges, but we are optimistic that the organic process of establishing the Phase II operation will open new doors of opportunity for us to pursue Phase III. We envision in Phase III, that UW Project IF will become an informational hub of sustainable urban agriculture and a platform that can provide opportunities to all different communities to join us to feed the world in a sustainable way.

Our vision of the Phase III operation inspires and encourages us to properly and thoroughly collect all the tangible data from both environmental and social impacts in the Phase II operation. Having the data on hand with a compelling story will be the key of success to our Phase III operation. 

Environmental Problem:

Project IF was founded in July 2018, and since its inception, has received a generous grant from the University of Washington Campus Sustainability Fund (UW CSF). This grant funding went towards successfully setting up the indoor farm in Condon Hall (~300 square feet), which includes a hydroponic system with 32 vertical growing towers and LED lights, a seedling rack with germination and seedling trays, and other equipment. Project IF was able to complete its initial Phase I objective to establish the infrastructure necessary to expand the farm’s output of produce. To date, we have grown over 150 lbs. of buttercrunch lettuce. Recently, we have also tested arugula, mint, and microgreens. In addition, we have had the opportunity to donate a large portion of our product to the local University District Food Bank, as well as donating some to the UW Student Veteran Lounge and engaging in outreach by attending local sustainability events. 

For Phase II, we aim to create a sizable on-campus farm (~3000 square feet) to provide a supplemental amount of leafy greens and herbs to dining halls, food banks, and cafes on campus such as the Husky Grind and Cultivate. According to the UW Housing and Food Services, the UW main campus serves about 20,000 meals a day. There are more and more student movements, like Huskies for Food Justice, requesting UW to source more food locally. Sourcing food locally from Project IF can help to cut down food transportation costs and consumed packaging, be a secure stream of produce, improve quality and freshness, and overall reduce UW’s carbon footprint. With a larger space and more resources, we also hope to produce a wider range of leafy greens and herbs, from buttercrunch lettuce to arugula and mint. While more product would be grown, our hydroponic system offers a sustainable alternative to traditional farming methods to produce higher yields with fewer resources. Our goal with Phase II is to maximize the positive impact of indoor urban farming on the UW community.  

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Both the social and environmental impact are tightly connected to student involvement. Our measurable metrics are designed to capture both. The eight different metrics are listed below with how we intend to collect the data. 

  1. Produce consumption. We will monitor the total amount of produce that is grown by students, sold on campus, and consumed by students and faculties. The average number of “food miles” an American meal travels from farm to plate is about 1500 miles. By tracking how much Project IF produce is consumed, we can reverse-calculate how many food miles we help to eliminate. 
  2. Website and monthly news. We will track the growth of traffic on our website and the number of subscribers for the monthly newsletter.
  3. Social media. We will track our overall reach and engagement on each of our social media channels. 
  4. Farm tour. We will track all the visitors to our farm tour and the IF certificate we give to those who partake any hands-on experience at our farm.
  5. Student volunteer program. We will track how many students volunteer at Project IF and their individual roles, achievements, and hours worked.
  6. Student staff. We will track how many student staff work at Project IF and their individual roles, achievement, and hours worked.
  7. Independent or capstone project. We will keep track of projects that are executed by students and measure the outcome and implementation of each finished project.
  8. Class collaboration. In addition to tracking class collaborations, we will capture the number of students that attend each section of a given class that Project IF is a part of. We will also highlight each collaboration in our monthly Project IF newsletter. Lastly, we will conduct a pre and post survey to better understand what students have learned with their involvement in Project IF.
Total amount requested from the CSF: $150,000
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Please see the Funding Information document in the supplementary documents.
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total: $250,000

Timeline:

Please see the Accountability and Feasibility document in the supplementary documents.
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Climate Justice Symposium

Executive Summary:

Institutional Climate Action (ICA) (https://institutionalclimateaction.wordpress.com/) proposes a Climate Justice Festival to collectively engage the UW Community in climate justice in the face of catastrophic climate change. We plan to hold the event in Red Square where the maximum number of student groups and community members can participate. The Festival is projected to cost $3,650, and we are asking CSF for these funds due to the event’s emphasis on sustainability, climate action, and long-term collective behavior change.

Additional Background:

ICA is a collaborative activism group founded in October 2019. Our purpose is to promote climate and sustainability-related action through coordinated and collective grassroots organizing. Through collective organizing across most higher education institutions in the Seattle-Tacoma region, we will push our public institutions to model the sustainable and just transition that is required for society to confront the climate crisis.

ICA has a flexible and decentralized organizational structure. While we are primarily organized in groups by institution, with the UW-Seattle subgroup being the group applying for funding, all members across campus meet regularly to coordinate activism efforts across institutions. At UW-Seattle, ICA is in the process of registering as an RSO, with the following officer positions: Co-Directors (Catrin Wendt and Hemalatha Velappan), Treasurer (Peter Fink), Secretary (Anna Humphreys), Sustainability Officer (Christoph Straus), and Outreach Coordinator (Esaac Mazengia).

Student Involvement:

UW students are the target audience for the Festival. ICA is presenting an opportunity for students to meaningfully engage with the climate justice community by learning about climate justice, sustainability, and other essential topics for creating a better world. Students will take away inspiration, connections, and momentum to continue their involvement with climate justice in a meaningful way.

Student volunteers are the foundation of ICA and the Climate Justice Festival. Just a few months into our existence, and solely by word of mouth, dozens of UW students are involved in ICA and enthusiastic about helping with the Festival. The months leading up to the Climate Justice Festival provide opportunities for existing members to continue to identify and recruit student volunteers. Publicizing the event will further allow us to engage with new student participants.

Volunteer positions for this event include:

Project Planning:

  • Teach-in outreach and organization
  • Outreach and publicity team
  • Social media
  • Press
  • Bake sale coordinator
  • Art build
  • Spatial logistics
  • Accessibility planning
  • Mapping

Event Organizers (day-of support):

  • Area Leads
  • Setup/cleanup
  • Runners
  • Peacekeepers,
  • Teach-in Coordinators
  • Art Coordinators
  • Press
  • Media liaison
  • Social media

Education & Outreach:

Outreach

We will employ a variety of strategies to spread awareness about the Climate Justice Festival. These strategies include but are not limited to:

Social media

  • Send Facebook event invites to our affiliate organizations during the first week of spring quarter
  • Post weekly about the Festival on ICA’s Facebook and Twitter beginning the first week of Spring quarter
  • Ask our social media community via direct message and personal interactions to share the event

Campus Publicity

Begin posting the first week of Spring quarter; engage our volunteers in weekly flyering events. Locations for flyers include:

  • Buildings in relevant departments (Health Sciences, College of the Environment, Human Centered Design and Engineering, etc.)
  • Husky Union Building
  • Libraries
  • Cafeterias and common spaces

Sidewalk chart art throughout UW campus the week of the Festival with brief, colorful information

Coalition Building

 ICA’s Coalition Building team is presently reaching out to existing groups on UW campus. As these efforts continue, we will engage our affiliate organizations in publicizing our event.We will invite existing climate justice and other relevant organizations to volunteer and participate in the event.

In-Class Announcements

We will reach out via email to professors of classes related to climate change, environmental issues, and social change. With permission, ICA members will make a quick announcement at the start or end of a class the week of the Festival.

Listservs

Send announcements to department listservs, including ASUW, GPSS, and CSF.

UW media

  • Submit a blurb for the uw.edu and relevant departmental websites.
  • Press release for and purchase advertising in The Daily, UW Today, and UWTV
  • Invite on-campus journalists to attend a meeting/event and write a story about climate justice and ICA, highlighting the upcoming Festival.

Education

              Education is a major focus of the Festival. Attendees will be encouraged to participate in teach-ins on topics that may include:

  • Climate Justice 101
  • Self-Care in the Climate Crisis
  • Seattle’s Green New Deal
  • Campus Sustainability at UW
  • Art and Activism
  • Songs for the Movement

We will educate attendees about how to get involved with climate action, both on and off campus. Climate justice organizations will be present with information and materials about how to sign on. We will encourage people to commit attending at least one meeting with one organization after the festival.

This event will provide an important foundation for behavior change: students will emerge from the Festival with a plan to get involved in climate action in a way that speaks to them.

From ICA’s modeling of sustainability at the event, using low-and no-waste principles, affiliate and attending organizations will have a framework to reduce waste in future events of their own.

Workshops

Teach-in workshops will take a variety of formats and may include: an interactive display paired with discussion, games, whiteboard or chalk brainstorms, or open discussion. They will be organized so students can join at any point in the session. Workshop facilitators will have backgrounds in working with students or facilitating large groups of people so they can comfortably navigate the dynamic nature of these workshops. Workshops will be short and will repeat to maximize the ability for student participation.

Use of Space

The PA system and keynote speaker space will be at the top of the first set of stairs on the northern side of the Square. A half hour before the speaker’s presentation, we will set out 25 chairs for people who wish to sit. Other attendees will stand.

The Art Build tent will be erected in the middle of the square, and provide a dynamic activity for people to participate in on their way between the tabling and bake sale tents (with 5-8 tents, depending on the number of tablers) and the workshop space (2 tents). Art will be displayed throughout the Square, and signs and sidewalk chalk will give directions for when and where events are taking place.

Environmental Impact:
  • Waste
  • Environmental Justice
  • Community Development
  • Cultural Representation
  • Social Justice
Project Longevity:

While our mission of inspiring students to fight for climate-preserving changes at the institutional level will continue, the proposed Climate Justice Festival is a one-time event that will not need additional funding.

Environmental Problem:

Change, especially climate-preserving and sustainable changes, must occur beyond the individual. While many resources exist to educate and inspire individuals to make sustainable changes in the face of catastrophic climate change, fewer resources exist to inspire and teach people to demand change of larger institutions and companies. ICA exists to address this barrier to lasting sustainability by first engaging students, staff, and faculty through events such as our proposed Climate Justice Festival. Once the UW community is engaged and familiar with the ICA mission, we will train budding activists to participate in peaceful activism events, coordinated to coincide with similar events at multiple campuses in the greater Seattle area.

 

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

We will measure the impacts of the Climate Justice Festival by monitoring community engagement. We will measure the engagement level of the UW community by monitoring participation at the festival (student and student club turn-out), and monitor sign-ups to our ICA newsletter. Alongside these engagement markers, we will be active across social media and will use engagement metrics offered by each social platform. Structure tests, which measure the ability to organize activists, will be conducted prior to and following our Climate Justice Festival to measure our ability to engage the UW community in climate justice.

Total amount requested from the CSF: $3,650
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
Keynote speaker100011000
Workshop facilitators and materials15071050
Red Square rental (150-250 people)7501750
Art building supplies1501750
Printing flyers.50400200
UW Daily 1/2 page ad5001 500

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

Timeline for Climate Justice Festival
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Contact student groups and invite them to participate in the eventJanuary - February 20202/29/20
Develop teaching plans and materials for teach-in workshopsFebruary - March 20203/31/2020
Conduct research on equipment rentals and vendors (for AV and tent rental)February 20202/15/2020
Amplify social media presenceFebruary - March 2020Ongoing
Place deposit for equipment and space rental (Upon receipt of funding) April 20204/5/2020
Social media campaignApril-May 20205/8/2020
Train volunteersApril 20204/21/2020
Check in with participating student groups regarding progress and any additional needsApril 20-30, 20204/30/2020
Walk the Red Square space with event volunteers and participants to visually stage the area; final volunteer trainingMay 2, 20205/2/2020

Project Approval Forms:

No-Till Soil Health and Weed Management Toolkit

Executive Summary:

The UW Farm began in 2006 as a student-powered project growing vegetables behind the old Botany Greenhouse. Today, thanks to the power of their vision and the support of the CSF, the UW Farm cultivates about 2 acres of growing space with two full-time staff and four part-time student staff. This past year we hosted twelve classes from across university departments, interacted with more than 500 students, and grew more vegetables than ever before. However, with this expansion we have felt a squeeze on our tool shed. Due to the inevitabilities of working with enthusiastic beginners some of our tools have been broken, while others we simply do not have enough of, leading to bottlenecks in production.

 

We would use this CSF grant to restock with high-quality tools designed to last, allowing the next generation of students to experience the efficiencies that small-scale farming has to offer. In addition to having enough tools, this grant would allow us to purchase the tools necessary for a no-till system. No-till systems are part of the so-called “brown revolution” in agriculture, which combines ancient ways of growing with new understandings of soil health (Montgomery 2017). Given the proper tools, we will be able to demonstrate a highly efficient system that produces healthier plants, sequesters carbon, saves water, and preserves soil health for the long haul. The proposed cost of our grant is $14,500 dollars, which would go primarily towards purchasing tools, soil tests, and soil building materials. 

 

Montgomery, David R. Growing a revolution: bringing our soil back to life. WW Norton & Company, 2017.

 

 

Student Involvement:

The tools purchased with these funds will be used by and for students on the UW Farm. Although this grant will not directly fund any student jobs, the tools will be used by our four student staff in farm production and education activities. These tools will be used by hundreds of volunteers, because we host 50-80 service learners each quarter as well as community volunteers, labs, and tours. This past year we interacted with 200 students in labs, 600 students on tours, and 200 service learners. Every one of these students either used our tools themselves or saw them in use, creating a huge opportunity for learning when we introduce these new tools. Responsibilities of volunteers on the UW Farm include multiple different production related tasks, including weeding, harvesting, washing, packing, and planting.

 

Education & Outreach:

Our primary mode of education will be with the classes and volunteers that interact with the UW Farm. We pursue education through production, so as students are volunteering we can use these tools as a gateway to talking about soil health and no-till management. For example, the question of what kind of hoe to use leads to further questions, such as how different weeds indicate soil health, how no-till management can reduce weed pressure, and how this applies on a broader scale to agriculture. This quarter, Eli Wheat and Adam Houston will be teaching a class on soils and carbon sequestration in agriculture, and we are hoping that our students will be able to use these tools to develop their own hypothetical management systems as part of their class work. 

Our secondary mode of education will be through informational signage in our tool shed. We already have a set of simple signs with the name of the tool, a picture, and a description of its use. We will be expanding these signs to include the new tools that we purchase, as well as updating our old signs. We also plan on making "CSF" stickers for the handles of our tools so that every time we show a student how to use a tool, we can remind them of where it came from. In addition, we will be using our Instagram, which has 1,387 followers, to publicize our new tools and systems. 

Our specific outreach goals include interacting with at least 600 students during the Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall quarters in 2020. All of these students will be exposed to our tools in some way, whether for a few minutes during a tour or over the course of service learning for a whole quarter. We track all student interactions with the UW Farm, so we will have a clear picture of usage by the end of the year. 

Environmental Impact:
  • Energy Use
  • Food
  • Living Systems and Biodiversity
  • Water
Project Longevity:

The tools purchased with these funds will be high-quality and designed to last. In addition, the UW Farm has a long-term commitment to education and production at the University of Washington, and will employ these tools in our systems as long as the UW Farm continues to exist. This is a one-time investment with a long-term payoff in terms of ecological health, student wellbeing and education, and farm productivity.

Environmental Problem:

The effect of tillage on soil intersects with a number of crucial environmental and social problems relating to the sustainability of human agriculture. Long-term use of tillage can cause a precipitous decline in the amount of organic carbon stored in the soil, which is then released into the atmosphere. It is estimated that by the time of the Industrial Revolution, humans had already contributed one-third of our total greenhouse gas emissions simply by tilling the soil (Lal 2004). Soils with less organic matter absorb less water, contributing to poor performance in droughts and increased erosion. Plants in unhealthy soils require more chemical fertilizer and more pesticides. Tillage also brings new weed seeds to the surface with every pass, creating a vicious cycle of more cultivation and more work (Montgomery 2017).

While the UW Farm currently operates on a low-tillage system, having the right tools would allow us to engage students more effectively in different models of agriculture. Every item in our budget fits into our system to promote soil health, sequester carbon, grow better crops, and make our labor more efficient. In this proposal, we will focus on three specific items and how they fit into our system: the broadfork, the flame weeder, and compost.

 

Broadforks are the most important garden bed preparation tool for any no-till grower of our scale (Fortier 2014). They allow us to aerate and loosen the soil without disturbing soil life. They also will reduce weed pressure, because they do not invert the soil and bring buried weed seeds to the surface.

 

In order to further reduce the amount of soil disturbance from weeding, we propose to purchase two different models of flame weeder, one for each of our sites. Flame weeding uses a gas torch to kill weeds when they are just beginning to germinate. This technique can be used to quickly create weed-free beds without cultivation of the soil. While it may seem counterintuitive to burn fossil fuels to kill weeds on a sustainable farm, the flame weeders in our budget actually use very little natural gas due to their efficient design, and they are a long-term investment in reducing the weed seed bank present in our soil.

 

One of the largest expenditures in the budget is for sixty yards of compost. No-till systems generally apply layers of compost that are several inches thick in order to boost soil organic matter and suppress weeds. We currently have access to compost made from UW leaves and coffee grounds, but that is only available in the fall and contains plastic and other litter. A large quantity of high-quality compost from Cedar Grove would be an important investment in soil health for the UW Farm.

Fortier, Jean-Martin, and Marie Bilodeau. The Market Gardener: A Successful Grower's Handbook for Small-scale Organic Farming. New Society Publishers, 2014.

Lal, Rattan. "Soil carbon sequestration impacts on global climate change and food security." Science. 

Montgomery, David R. Growing a revolution: bringing our soil back to life. WW Norton & Company, 2017.

 

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

As mentioned in the "Sustainability Challenge" section, no-till management will likely improve a number of metrics for the UW Farm. We will be focused on tracking soil health metrics through the use of spring and fall soil testing with the Cornell Comprehensive Assessment of Soil Health test. This is the best available test for understanding the biological properties of our soils, along with the nutrient content. We will be testing certain growing areas in the spring and fall that we will be tilling and compare them to those that we do not till. Our quantitative measurements will allow us to estimate the amount of carbon we are sequestering in our soils through our management methods.  This will go along with qualitative observations over the course of the season, such as weed pressure, soil quality, and crop vitality. 

In addition, as mentioned in the "Education & Outreach" section, we will be tracking student involvement with the UW Farm in order to assess educational outcomes. 

Total amount requested from the CSF: $14,500
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

This table is a budget for farm tools to be purchased with the CSF grant.
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
People’s Broadfork - Meadow Creature20061200
Tilther - Johnny's7001700
Compost - Cedar Grove36602160
Paper Pot Transplanter Set - Johnny's250012500
Silage Tarps, 50' x 100' - Johnny's3002600
Pyroweeder - Farmer's Friend8501850
Flame Blade - Farmer's Friend1001100
Seedbed Flame Weeder Set8001800
Propane Tank - Seattle Propane70170
Gridder - Johnny's4001400
Long-Handled Wire Weeder - Johnny's506300
Narrow Collinear Hoe, 3-3/4" - Johnny's506300
Wide Collinear Hoe, 7" - Johnny's506300
Glaser Wheel Hoe, 12" - Johnny's4502700
Weed Guard Plus Paper Mulch, 48" x 250' - Gempler's605300
Pacifist Wire Head Master Kit - Johnny's706420
Mutineer Hoe Handle656390
Collinear Hoe Head Master Kit456270
Jang JP-1 Push Seeder - Johnny's4501450
Soil tests - Cornell University6015900
Six-row seeder - Johnny's6751675
CSF Stickers - Vistaprint361 roll of 25036

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Purchase and assemble tools1-2 weeksMarch 2020, or as soon as funds are received
Spring soil testing1-2 weeksMarch 2020 with UW Soil Science classes
Tool usage and education10 - 20 yearsTools will be used on the UW Farm for the duration of their lifetime, beginning March 2020
Fall soil testing1-2 weeksNovember 2020 with UW class

Heron Haven Restoration

Executive Summary:

Home to the largest Douglas-fir on campus and an imperiled heron rookery, Heron Haven has the profound potential to become a thriving, biologically-rich greenspace that students, faculty, and staff can engage with.

If ‘empty’ spaces on the UW campus were looked at through the lens of an ecologist, many would be identified as ecologically unhealthy and in need of remediation. Heron Haven is currently one of these unhealthy spaces. Though the site beautifully frames a view of Mt. Rainier and the Cascades with its towering stand of mixed conifers, it’s ecology is threatened by our changing climate and many common invasive species. 

Situated immediately south of Drumheller Fountain is a wedge of greenspace lovingly dubbed Heron Haven, so named because of the heron rookery that exists in its upper canopy. Despite being central to campus and situated immediately in the vicinity of UW’s environmentally-focused departments, Heron Haven hopelessly exists without a keeper. It is densely vegetated, but with various monocultures of invasive weeds, including the smothering groundcover English Ivy. Cherry laurel, Himalayan blackberry, English hawthorn, and Italian arum have also successfully outcompeted native species, suppressing much needed plant diversity. A lack of plant diversity means there is also a lack of diversity in all other organisms that inhabit this space, from insects, to mammals, to bacteria. The low diversity of flora and fauna contributes to poor environmental resiliency, especially in the face of imminent climate change.

This project aims to re-establish native flora that can withstand the aforementioned stresses of climate change while also maintaining and restoring populations of native fauna. I propose restoring the site by removing invasive plants, establishing native plantings, and adding human elements, such as paths, seating areas, and interpretive signage. Doing this would turn Heron Haven into an activated, welcoming space that invites students to interact with the environment around them rather than idly passing by. Through close collaboration with the UW chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration, UW Grounds Management, the Department of Landscape Architecture, the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, and many individual volunteers, Heron Haven will become a space that embodies the natural character of our unique Cascadia ecoregion, connecting students to the unique landscape in our own backyard.

I am seeking $56,161 to complete the ecological restoration and redesign of Heron Haven. The vast majority of the grant will cover the cost of plants, which must be able to fill a 38,000 square foot site (plant costs were calculated at a rate of $1.00 per square foot). The SER nursery will be the primary source of plants, but due to their small capacity, it is likely that a considerable percentage of the plants will have to be purchased elsewhere. The other costs will be broken down further in the budgetary section of the proposal, and encompass other important costs such as the costs to obtain nurse logs, and a fund to ensure the site is managed into the future.

 

Student Involvement:

The Society for Ecological Restoration-UW, an environmental group on campus, has been instrumental in the creation and development of the Heron Haven project. The Heron Haven Site Manager, Nikoli, has already involved members from every aspect of the organization in the restoration process. Site Managers of the SER-UW organize volunteer events, in which students interested in learning about restoration techniques are invited on a site tour, a tools safety lesson, and led through restoration activities that involve removal of invasive species and planting of native plants. Once Nikoli graduates, the management of the Heron Haven site will be passed onto another student, who will take on the task of maintenance and upkeep of the site. A new officer position will be created in SER-UW that is in charge of ensuring the success of Heron Haven, and our many other completed sites. Julianna Hoza, the Site Manager for the recently completed Paccar Site, will be assisting Nikoli in the leadership of Heron Haven, by monitoring the survival of many key species. Annabel Weyhrich, and Xavaar Quaranto will also be shadowing Nikoli during the entire process, holding work events with volunteers. 

The Heron Haven site, as a site that requires extensive removal of English ivy and planting of hundreds of native plants, will host dozens of volunteer work events throughout the school year. Once the site is established, the Heron Haven site will need yearly maintenance performed by volunteers, which will provide ample opportunity for students of every background to become involved in restoration and sustainability activities. Several thousand volunteer hours will be required to restore Heron Haven, providing ample opportunity for students to become involved throughout the year long process. Volunteerism is just one of the many student activities that restoration of the Heron Haven will provide for students. In previous years, the SER-UW has hosted Service Learners, who are committed to volunteering with the SER-UW for the quarter. Heron Haven is a site that is uniquely large enough to allow the SER-UW to take on Service Learners again. Volunteers and Service Learners may become inspired by their time spent on the Heron Haven site to take on their own leadership position. And if not, the time spent on Heron Haven will still remain a valuable part of their ecological education at our university. 

Research throughout the School of Environmental and Forestry Science has largely depended on students ability to travel great distances to perform field work. However, there are many students who are unable to travel to perform research, as they are constrained by time, finances, disabilities, or other factors. The presence of the Heron Haven site on campus, and with such close proximity to SEFS laboratories, allows for the unique opportunity for forestry and restoration research to be performed by students without the additional burden of travel. Already, an undergraduate student Julianna Hoza is designing a research project to monitor the survival of plant species established on restoration sites throughout campus to compare restoration practices. Some species that she will specifically monitor on this site are sword fern, salal, thimbleberry, and redwood sorrel. Research opportunities can be largely self-determined, and will be a collaborative effort between the student researcher and the current manager of the Heron Haven. Research projects have been conducted with the SER-UW as a part of student capstones, and thus implementing further research projects at the Heron Haven site will be likely.

Education & Outreach:

The Heron Haven site is located in the heart of campus, with thousands of students passing by it daily. The high visibility of this project means it will receive organic exposure among students, with increasing awareness each quarter as students alter their routes to accommodate new class schedules. As students learn about the site and its design both during and following completion, it will become a destination for group meetings, spontaneous conversations, and casual gatherings amongst a thriving ecosystem. Activities on the site will be formally publicised using outreach efforts instigated by the Society for Ecological Restoration-UW. The SER-UW is the organization that has thus far overseen work performed on the Heron Haven site, and has connections to a wide range of networks that reach across campus. Events on Heron Haven will be posted on the SER-UW calendar, shared in their weekly newsletters, advertised during club meetings, and discussed during SER-UW outreach events. Additionally, information about the Heron Haven is made available on the SER-UW website under “Current Projects”, where the public can go to learn more about the site and reach out to Nikoli with questions. 

As information about the Heron Haven site spreads through these outreach techniques, we will also work to build on our established educational partnerships with existing campus programs and curricula. Multiple departments on campus - L ARCH, SEFS, Biology, and ESRM - feature plant identification courses that require students to be exposed to living plant specimens. Two of the primary destinations for plant identification practice are the Union Bay Natural Area and the UW Arboretum, but their distance from main campus presents a challenge for students to access these natural areas. Once restored, Heron Haven will become a native plant demonstration area on main campus where students can learn about plants native to the Pacific Northwest - especially ones typically found in a forest understory.

In addition to the students who are actively seeking out native plant identification practice, interpretive signage and plant ID placards will create low-commitment educational opportunities for students, staff, and incidental visitors alike. This signage will be permanent installations on the Heron Haven site, and will have information on native plant species, the heron rookery, ecosystem services, and anthropogenic impacts on the environment. Alongside this signage, site visitors will be able to witness the decomposition of installed nurse logs and the life they harbor, exposing them to the slow processes that shape our native forests. There will be opportunities to observe the establishment of nesting sites by bird species who have lost many of their favorite food sources and trees to the influx of invasive species. Through making these processes and systems evident, the hope is to promote a sense of biophilia not only within recurring students involved on site, but also among people who may only visit the site once. 

Instilling students with knowledge in the field of restoration ecology is a central goal for the Heron Haven site. Heron Haven will act as a living laboratory for students of ecological restoration and other programs in the ESRM and SEFS departments. As long as this project is stewarded by SER-UW, its care, management, planning, and labor will be overseen entirely by students. The opportunities for students to learn by managing a real restoration site, participating in boots-on-the-ground restoration work, and collaborating interdisciplinarily will help create well-rounded students who are better prepared to solve restoration problems outside the university environment. The site can even act as an inspiration for students to undertake similar projects on campus as it matures.

 

Environmental Impact:
  • Living Systems and Biodiversity
  • Environmental Justice
Project Longevity:

Resilience and sustainablility are the two primary goals of this project. The replacement of invasive weeds with native plants is inherently sustainable and will require diminishing effort to maintain over time. Installing a diverse understory will prevent invasive species from returning, and their natural propagation will eliminate the need for weed pulling and other maintenance activities that already have to occur yearly. 

Restoration of the site depends on clearance of weeds, after which native plants can be installed. Plant installation will follow a schedule of initial planting, active maintenance, and then passive maintenance over time. Any planting done in a particular season will be actively maintained over a period of 5 years following installation. Active maintenance will include regularly scheduled volunteer events, plant replacement, and identification and analysis of plant mortality. After a period of 5 years, passive maintenance will begin to ensure the investment’s survival. Passive maintenance will include volunteer events to remove weeds, with declining frequency over time.

This project will remain under the management of the SER-UW, which has been continuously and consistently stewarding restoration projects on campus since its inception in 2008. Funding for future volunteer events and plant replacement will be earmarked out of this funding request, and used at the discretion of the future Site Manager in SER-UW who will be individually dedicated to the continued oversight of Heron Haven. Stewardship of the site will also be featured in future iterations of the Intro to Restoration Ecology course led by Jon Bakker, with work also slated to be done through the Restoration in North America course led by Caren Crandall. Over the course of the next year, the project will likely be seen by other SEFS and ESRM professors who want to get their students out in the field.

 

Environmental Problem:

 

    When looked at in reference to the three pillars of sustainability, Heron Haven currently lacks in all categories. Economically, maintenance on Heron Haven by UW Grounds includes many tasks that amount to several thousand dollars a year in costs to the university. Socially the site doesn’t have any glaring equity or inclusion issues, but lacks in spaces for general use. Finally, the environmental condition of the site is deplorable and in dire need of restoration as discussed throughout this proposal.

    The environmental issues with Heron Haven are numerous, and the primary reason for undertaking this work in the first place. The site has a limited ability to filter stormwater, function as habitat, provision oxygen, cycle nutrients, and act as functional habitat for countless native species. Two of the most critical issues that need to be addressed, are the site’s ability to sequester carbon, and the survival of certain species given the harsh reality of climate change. Plants for the project will be sourced from various nurseries with the hope of obtaining as many unique genetic individuals as possible. In completing this project, all of these valuable systems will be returned to a functional state, and given the genetic variability needed to combat the changing climate. 

    A key piece of this project is the implementation of social spaces designed for anyone to utilize. These designed spaces range from a large wood round repurposed as a bench/table, to a therapeutic trail with ample seating for contemplation and casual chat; all of which will stand up to the elements for decades to come. The most valuable space for social activities, and the change that will save UW Grounds the most money, are the proposed forest meadows. These native floral plantings will replace the grassy knolls both on the southeast corner of the site, and northern triangle. The current turf grass lawns require biweekly mowing by grounds staff, emitting CO2, costing the university money, and disturbing the imperiled herons who require a near silent nesting habitat. 

 

 

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

The environmental impacts of restoration sites are commonly measured by the ecological services the restoration site provides. The Heron Haven site will provide ecosystem services in the form of carbon sequestration, water filtration, oxygen provisioning, nutrient cycling, soil retention, and habitat provisioning. Current estimates suggest that individual trees can sequester several pounds of carbon per year (depending on the growth rate of the species of tree), sequestering up to nearly 50 pounds of carbon for mature trees. 50+ of trees will be planted on the Heron Haven site, and an estimated number of 30 trees surviving to maturity. Thus, with 20 trees pre-existing, the Heron Haven site has the ability to sequester roughly 2500 pounds of carbon in just trees alone. The Heron Haven site will sequester additional tons of carbon as felled logs from the UW Grounds log lot are installed on campus, saving the logs from being burned or otherwise disposed of. Additional calculations for water filtration, oxygen provisioning, nutrient cycling and soil retention can be made in similar ways with current plant physiological models. 

Additionally, invasive and unwanted non-native species will be removed from site. These plants have detrimental effects on native flora and fauna, by replacing prime habitat with vegetation that provides little shelter or food. The amount of invasive English ivy removed per work party is recorded, with a total of over 1500 pounds of English ivy having already been removed from the site. An additional 4000 pounds of English ivy and other invasive species will need to be removed from the Heron Haven site. The number of volunteers who participate in activities on the Heron Haven site are also recorded in the required sign in sheet that is provided at SER-UW events, as well as the number of hours that individual volunteers had contributed to the project. Thus, both the number of individual volunteers who participated in the project and the total number of volunteer hours contributed to this site will be essential measurable impacts throughout the restoration process.

 

Total amount requested from the CSF: $56,161
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

See attached formatted budget with notes
Heron Haven Detailed Budget
MaterialsMaterialsDescriptionsEstimated costs (each)QuantitysubWSST/SEATotal
Plants Detailed in planting budget $ 10.00 3000 $ 30,000.00 $ 3,060.00 $ 33,060
Plant ID Signage Labeling plantings $ 20.00 50 $ 1,000.00 $ 102.00 $ 1,102
Site Features Signage Illustrating Processes + 'Heron Haven' signs $ 50.00 5 $ 250.00 $ 25.50 $ 276
Washed Rock Edge of paths ($42 a yd w/out delivery) $ 100.00 2 $ 200.00 $ 20.40 $ 220
Flagging Flagging for planning + install $ 5.00 50 $ 250.00 $ 25.50 $ 276
Weed Control treatment of Italian arum $ 50.00 1 $ 50.00 $ 5.10 $ 55
Chicken Wire Protecting plants from rabbits 3' $ 13.00 4 $ 52.00 $ 5.30 $ 57
Stakes Used for caging 3' $ 4.00 25 $ 100.00 $ 10.20 $ 110
Plastic Sheeting Smothering Grass (maybe burlap) $ 100.00 1 $ 100.00 $ 10.20 $ 110
$ 32,002.00 $ 3,264.20 $ 35,266
Delivery/PlacementPurposeDetailsCost/MileMilessubWSST/SEATotal
Log DeliveryThe UW heavy equipment teamN/AN/A$2,500 $255.00 $ 2,755
Truck Rental Renting a truck for delivering plants $ 1.49 300 $ 507.00 $ 51.71 $ 558.71
$ 3,314
Labor TradePersonnel Job Classification WageHours neededTotal
KingLandscape Construction UW GroundsUW Employees$39.18 50$1,959.00 $1,959.00
KingLandscape MaintenanceGroundskeeper student rate*Student employee$17.87 300$5,361.00 $5,361.00
300 hours/ 5 qtrs is 60 hrs per qtr. 10 week qtr = 6 hours a wk. *1/2 UW Grounds*$7,320.00
ToolsToolsPurposeEstimated costs (each)QuantitysubWSST/SEATotal
Shovels $ 20.14 10 $ 201.40 $ 20.54 $ 221.94
Gloves Washable gloves for reuse $ 6.00 20 $ 120.00 $ 12.24 $ 132.24
Wheelbarrow (used) For use hauling mulch $ 50.00 2 $ 100.00 $ 10.20 $ 110.20
Rakes Spreading mulch $ 22.00 6 $ 132.00 $ 13.46 $ 145.46
$ 553.40 $ 56.45 $ 609.85
Subtotal $ 46,509.76
10% Contingency$51,160.74
Future Management$5,000
Total$56,160.74

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

See attached Gantt chart
Task

8th Annual Legacy Soiree - Black Student Union

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

BIOSWALE UW: San Juan Basin Regional Green Stormwater Infrastructure Facility

Executive Summary:

Our interdisciplinary team of University of Washington students, faculty, Miller Hull design professionals, and KPFF engineers would like to share with you this proposal to create a new on-campus regional stormwater treatment facility. The facility we propose would be constructed in concert with the new Health Sciences Education Building (HSEB) and serve a basin of ~34 acres which consists both of University-owned land and City of Seattle right-of-way, discharging to a UW-owned storm outfall to Portage Bay. Runoff from the existing basin is currently untreated. Creating a regional stormwater quality treatment facility will proactively preclude the need for site-by-site required stormwater treatment with any campus development by creating one regional facility. Just upstream of the existing outfall; a flow-splitter will be installed, diverting flow to an abandoned concrete flume historically used in conjunction with the teaching lab for civil engineering classes. Bioretention soil, plants, and necessary infrastructure will be installed within that flume. The proposed phase one cost of $107,649 would cover associated research-validated design and evaluation and 50% construction materials, the rest of which will be matched by other funding.

Our core project team includes Professor Amy Kim who as a faculty adviser will be responsible for overseeing the project with her PhD student, Erin Horn. Erin will play a large role in project oversight, analysis, and mentoring of graduate and undergraduate researchers working on the project. Dr. Jessica Ray, CEE, will also advise, bringing expertise on selective removal of contaminants in stormwater with low-cost composites and guide student work on the topic both in research and classroom settings. Dr. Brooke, L.Arch, will also serve as a faculty liaison for the project and will guide student research and academic work, including design and implementation of educational signage and the creation of an evaluative white paper on the project. Professional partners include Chris Hellstern, Miller Hull. Puja Shaw, KPFF PE, will be will be responsible for coordinating with UW students and staff, permitting agencies, and the project design team while also overseeing the technical design of the facility. Kara Weaver will be the landscape architecture project manager and will work with UW students and staff, permitting agencies, and the project design team to help integrate the facility into its campus context and to develop soil strategies and planting palettes.

In the first phase of this project, proposed here, work supervised Dr. Amy Kim and Dr. Jessica Ray help guide effective, research-validated media and system design. Ray and Kim will partner with UW Housing & Food Services to convert food waste to biochar to add as a potential soil amendment stormwater treatment media in the flume. Likewise, Dr. Sullivan and students will provide academic expertise in cutting-edge bioremediation plant selection and guide incorporation of campus and community environmental education around themes of ecological well-being and resilience. Student involvement will be a cornerstone of the design, evaluation, and implementation of the regional stormwater treatment facility, and graduate and undergraduate students, both paid and volunteer will drive the project.

Student Involvement:

The current budget includes directly hiring 2 undergraduate students and 2 graduate students on an hourly basis to be trained to perform water quality testing but also teach them to engage in research by investigating and identifying methods to quantify environmental, economic, and social benefits of green infrastructures. Undergraduate researchers will present their work at the annual UW Undergraduate Research symposium. Dr. Sullivan will also supervise a graduate student who will help guide L. Arch student volunteers involved in the project and will be responsible for collating the results of the course, data and design/management solutions, into a white paper demonstrating the role the new facility played in student education in ecological design and planning.

Graduate students – 2 at 100 hours/quarters for 3 quarters. Erin (PI: Kim) will provide oversight (1 quarter). Fanny, a doctoral student (PI: Dr. Ray) is investigating a new modified sand media for stormwater treatment of legacy contaminants. The new sand media will be compared to and combined with a pyrolyzed biomass charcoal-like adsorption filter media (i.e., biochar) to maximize contaminant removal (1-2 quarters). One student (of Dr. Kim) will investigate the value of multi-disciplinary project and quantify the economic benefits of green infrastructure systems (3-4 quarters). She is currently seeking a grad student that can work on a literature review of a value-driven multi-sector stakeholder decision-making framework to support the building and water intersection.

 

Undergrads - 2 undergrads for conducting sampling and water quality testing and assist in developing the value assessment framework.

 

Dr. Kim is a faculty advisor for American Public Works Association (APWA) Student Chapter.  Dr. Ray teaches CEE 357 Environmental Engineering for Civil Engineering juniors. Dr. Ray has recruited students from this class who are interested in performing stormwater treatment research. This proposed project is perfectly aligned with the interests of CEE 357 students as it merges civil and environmental engineering principles.

Education & Outreach:

The project will be shared broadly with undergraduate students in CEE through integration into existing courses such as CEE 429 (Sustainability in Building Infrastructure) and CEE 307 (Construction Engineering for 50% of the entire junior class in CEE) taught every year by Dr. Kim. KPFF and Miller Hull will invite students to project meetings, offer office visits, conduct building/site tours, provide internship opportunities, and speak about the project in classes.

This facility will serve as an ongoing resource for students in the Department of Landscape Architecture who will be provided with the opportunity to assess existing conditions, develop conceptual design alternatives and participate in long-term monitoring and adaptive management. Designs will be required to facilitate at least one of two potential program elements by developing conceptual plans for 1) growing edible plants, and/or 2) for growing native plants to remediate water quality issues. During Spring 2020, through LArch 463, Ecological Design and Planning (~50 students), an inaugural cohort of will be introduced to the site and the project. Students will have the opportunity to work with GGN and Kara Weaver PLA to develop design alternatives, which will further provide opportunities for students to network and expand their understanding of professional practice in ecological design and planning projects.

 

The faculty advisors Amy Kim and Jessica Ray will support the student team to participate in the US EPA’s Campus RainWorks Challenge (link: https://www.epa.gov/green-infrastructure/campus-rainworks-challenge-0) which is open to any institutions of higher education across the US.

 

On a campus-wide scale, students will be invited to participate in the project as it develops and will have ongoing opportunities to utilize the stormwater treatment facility for education and sustainable programming. Educational signage to accompany the stormwater treatment site will support campus community environmental education, feature relevant local indigenous knowledge and acknowledgment, and emphasize the CSF project’s ongoing strong transdisciplinary collaboration around stormwater management to holistically addresses environmental and human health as a keystone of sustainable campus development and culture.

Environmental Impact:
  • Food
  • Living Systems and Biodiversity
  • Waste
  • Water
  • Environmental Justice
  • Community Development
Project Longevity:

This work would be followed up with a second phase which would take place upon construction with additional evaluation and educational use and development of the stormwater treatment flume, during which water sampling of the flume would become an important component. Future courses would build use of the facility as a theoretical or applied system within their syllabi and could include site maintenance and/or organization of community educational events as relevant.

While this proposal includes 50% material costs, construction, permitting, and other implementation costs and supervision will be overseen by Miller-Hull and KPFF. Evaluation of project efficacy of stormwater treatment and regulation compliance would be expected regularly from SPU. Maintenance is expected to follow standard procedures in place by UW Facilities maintenance, and additional description can be found in the attached maintenance document, which highlights the benefits of having one regional facility, proposed here, as compared to constructing many with each new project, as will otherwise be required.  

Environmental Problem:

Runoff from the existing basin is currently untreated, and future development within the basin would only exceed thresholds for onsite stormwater management (OSM) – not water quality (WQ) treatment. KPFF’s analysis has illustrated that the benefits of a regional WQ facility would provide immediate, ongoing, and measurable benefits far beyond those of project-by-project OSM.

 

This San Juan Basin Regional Water Quality Facility, which KPFF is currently working with Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) and the University of Washington to design would serve a basin of ~34 acres which consists both of University-owned land and City right-of-way, discharging to a 42 inch UW-owned storm outfall to Portage Bay. The proposed regional facility will be located just upstream of the existing outfall; a flow-splitter will be installed on the existing stormwater conveyance system, diverting flow to an abandoned concrete flume historically used in conjunction with the teaching lab for civil engineering classes. Bioretention soil, plants, and necessary infrastructure will be installed within that flume. 

 

Moreover, the creation of this new campus regional stormwater treatment facility in concert with the new Health Sciences Education Building offers a synergistic opportunity to grow transdisciplinary campus involvement around the interconnections of environmental and human health and well-being and deepen interdisciplinary sustainable campus research and education opportunities.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Project impact will be evaluated through water quality evaluation, research-validation of design directions, Life Cycle Analysis (LCA), and application of a value assessment framework. Work supervised by Dr. Sullivan will collate the results of her project design survey course, data,  and design/management solutions, into a white paper demonstrating the role the new facility played in student education in ecological design and planning.

Toward water quality assessment and research-informed design, Ray and Kim will partner with UW Housing & Food Services to convert food waste to biochar to add as a potential soil amendment stormwater treatment media in the flume. Preliminary tests will be conducted to determine the feasibility of converting food waste to charcoal adsorbent.

Regular water quality sampling will be performed with subsequent analysis to characterize stormwater pollutant profiles and bioswale treatment efficacy. Stormwater pollutant profiles will consist of analyses of trace organic compounds, trace metals and nutrients (e.g., ammonium and phosphate) which are commonly found at elevated concentrations in stormwater runoff in urbanized areas.

 

Stormwater pollutants will be quantified and characterized using advanced analytical instrumentation in the CEE analytical center, the Department of Chemistry Mass Spectrometry Facility, and the Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute. If a reduction in contaminant load is necessary, the CEE graduate student will apply low-cost pyrolyzed biomass product (i.e., biochar) as a soil amendment to passively absorb trace contaminants in stormwater runoff. The biochar will be prepared using a portion of compost food wastes from UW HFS cafes and dormitories and characterized under the supervision of Professor Ray who has experience in the required surface chemistry and materials characterization techniques. 

Total amount requested from the CSF: $107,649
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Itemized Proposed Budget
ItemCost
2 graduate students - 4 quarters, 90 hours per quarter, $35/hr
2 undergraduate students - 4 quarters, 75 hours per quarter, $16/hr, $16/hr (Total Personnel cost = $34,800 + Benefits = $7,349)
2 conferences, 2 people per conference - $6,000 ($1500 per person)
Lab computer - $2,000
Lab consumable$500
Materials for filtration system$1,000
Water quality testing - $1,000
L.Arch student hours + other$5,000
Total Campus Involvement Funding Cost$57,649
50% Materials$50,000
Total requested - $107,649 

Non-CSF Sources:

Client sourced funding (being organized by Miller-Hull$50,000 minimum
Project Completion Total: $160,000

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Design and Research-Validation Part 1 CompletionSeptember 2020
Construction completionMarch 2022
Sampling and performance evaluation startsMarch 2022

Preserving Natya UW

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Self-compassion workshop pilot for first year students who are also parents

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Trauma informed mindfulness training

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

eBook of the stories and experiences of students of color at UW

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Healing spaces heat map

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Diversity Includes Disability

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

QTPOC Healing in the Outdoors

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Capillaries: The Journal of Narrative Medicine

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Many Voices: A Storytelling Toolkit for Community-based Oral History Projects

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Mapping for the Wellbeing of UW

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Resilience and Urban Sustainability in Public Writing Partnerships

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Neah Bay Telling Our Stories: Imagining Our Futures

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

RepairCycle

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

A Retreat to Build Faculty Capacity for Mindful Leadership

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Indigenizing Urban Seattle Podcast

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Women in Applied Mathematics Mentorship Program (WAMM)

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Resilience and Compassion @ Odegaard Pop-Up Events

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Carbon-Labeling Initiative

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Steam Condensate Reclamation - Feasibility Study

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Pac-12 Sustainability Conference Student Registration Funding

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Khmer New Years Show 2019

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

A Green New Deal: Panel Discussion

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

2019 Global Leadership Summit

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Taiko Kai Spring Concert

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Presence

Executive Summary:

Presence is a place where students can learn from one another's personal experiences & meditation journeys, inspiring personal growth via the support of a student-led, student-run community. Located within a 10-minute walk from central campus, our furnished studio meeting space provides a comforting oasis for any and all who care to experiment or expand upon topics of mindfulness.

The founding of Presence was inspired from our (Ethan and Shelby’s) time working together at the UW Resilience Lab. We worked with Dr. Anne Browning, Director of Resilience Lab, to analyze incoming data regarding the mental states of incoming freshmen. We discovered that a staggering population of students struggled with themes of belonging, social connection, and self-esteem. Through discussion, the two of us came to share that we too had personally struggled with these themes as UW students. Furthermore, we came to recognize that both of us had found support during these tough times through our own personal practices of meditation. We shared in common the experience of using meditation as a useful tool to better understand ourselves, as well as exploring how to heal in the face of personal challenges. Meditation provided long-term holistic solutions in the dealings of personal obstacles, instead of relying on consumption (commonly seen with alcohol, drugs, material possessions amongst students).  Presence was born upon the realization that meditation, having been so useful for the two of us, may be useful for other students as well. Having wished that meditation had been more accessible at UW in our time of need, we hope that it now can be accessible for students in their time of need.

Both from personal experience, conversations with other students, and exposure to mental health data at the UW; It has become glaringly obvious how great the need is at our school for students to be able to experience genuine connection and community. Although UW offers yoga through the Mindfulness program at the IMA, conversations with Mindfulness director Danny Arguetty has signified an absence of student community around such mindful topics. His program has sustained students physical need for stretching, movement, and exploration of slow movement, however Danny agrees that there is a lack of continued vulnerable and intimate dialogue between students when it comes to their own mental health. Knowing how significant and impactful community and social connection is, we see an opportunity for growth at UW. We have experienced how meditation inspires groundbreaking inner-clarity and centeredness, and we are adamant about building a much needed community based upon values of vulnerability and honesty, as well as expression and true self-acceptance.

Student Involvement:

During our weekly meetings, we often reach out to members of the club to lead an introductory activity, such as a stretch or guided visualization. Any of our members that have activities they’ve done in the past that helped them discover a mindful state, are actively encouraged to speak up. These ideas are incorporated into an upcoming week’s agenda.

 

We are in the process of expanding our administrative responsibilities to members who want to contribute to our overall success. The latest addition to our executive team is Jon, who has been with us since our first meeting, bringing his experience from working with the UW Mindfulness Program and Danny Arguetty. He will assist in spreading the word about Presence and collaborating with various communities who might benefit & enjoy mindfulness practices.

 

Our club is still nascent and Shelby and Ethan are still upholding most of the club’s responsibilities. However, we’ve made it clear to our members that if they want to contribute on the executive team, we will create an opportunity for them. Ultimately, we value being flexible and honoring our members’ excitement and interest in furthering our mission.

 

Some of the roles we’re considering are:

- Marketing & Outreach: curating advertising content, hanging posters, developing an advertising strategy, thinking critically about new potential communities to reach

- Website Management: ensuring information on the website is up to date and reflects our current status (website not yet active; in production)

- Event Planners: plans speaker and retreat events, organizes logistics, tracks costs

- Internal Communication: responsible for delivering reminders, messages, weekly email updates, text messages for group meeting organization

Education & Outreach:

Presence plans on taking multiple approaches when it comes to education and outreach.

First, Presence will collaborate with UW Mindfulness, and begin to gain visibility through their established marketing and outreach channels. This includes tabeling, verbal advertisement before yoga classes, and other Mindfulness marketing opportunities. Presence will also table on their own independent time, as well as in the upcoming Fall RSO fair. We will spread posters around campus in public bulletin boards, as well as in the HUB.

Secondly, Presence plans to hold meetings throughout the quarter during campus’ busiest times in public places like the Quad and Red Square. Through physical presence, our group will be a sort of spectacle from the standard students who are walking to class or sitting reading a book. We will have our branding and poster nearby so that passersby can connect the meeting to our mission, as explored further through our website that will introduce to them who we are and how to get involved. In fact, students will be invited right then and there to join us in meditation, if they are inclined.

Thirdly, Presence has collaborated with a fellow student organization called BizzBuzz whom has supported us in forming a marketing plan. They have been incredibly supportive in their role to create and design an effective and accessible website, as well as develop a MailChimp account in order to provide students with an email subscription of updates and information from Presence. They have also advised us on branding strategies to get the word out. Our website will be incredibly educational, as a section of the website will provide a “portfolio” which will outline resources for exploration into meditation and mindfulness from tried and true authors and researchers within the field. The website will also educate members of our values, mission, introduction to club members (via short bios), as well as meeting times and place. Furthermore, Presence plans on continuing collaboration with organizations in the UW community, with entities such as The Daily, Rainy Dawg Radio, ASUW Food Co-Op, Resilience Lab, Mental Health and Counseling Center. Through mutually beneficial relationships, we intend to support one another by spreading the word about what each entity offers.

Fourthly, each member will serve as a living breathing role model and poster child for Presence. We would like to create swag such as t-shirts, stickers, water bottles that will be embodied by members. As these members engage with the UW community, they will effortlessly spread the word about Presence. Each member who receives swag will be encouraged to promote Presence in an authentic way, and always be welcome and open to students who are curious about getting involved.

Environmental Impact:
  • Energy Use
  • Community Development
  • Cultural Representation
  • Social Justice
Project Longevity:

As an activity that has been proven by science to be fundamental in improving mental health, we anticipate Presence to develop strong roots in the UW community. As founders, and intended graduates of the 2020 class, we intend to groom and select two presidents to carry on internal and external oversight of Presence responsibilities in the 2020/21 year and on. We will have a democratic election in which all members will cast a vote for who they like to represent them. This election process and discussion will begin Winter quarter of 2020, and voted members will then shadow the current presidents in order to prepare for the following years responsibilities. New leadership will be provided with a transitional document that outlines responsibilities, passwords, leadership advice/past experience, breakdown of meetings and events, etc that they may reference at any point and time for support when needed. Even after graduating, we will be available to consult virtually with the presidents if they are facing any challenges. Furthermore, Ethan and I will pass on our relationship with the UW Mindfulness program and program leader Danny Arguetty who serves as a mentor and advisor for our club. As a practicing yogi, Mindfulness instructor, program leader, and UW professional, he serves as an influential advisor and support to the club as an experienced adult who also shares stakes in the club’s success.

In terms of financial maintenance beyond our first two years, we aim to be sustained through the partnership among other UW entities. The UW Mindfulness Program offers the opportunity to earn support through the application to tap into a donation based fund in which they have been collecting for years now. Additionally at the IMA, club registration as a Rec Club offers an opportunity to be funded by the IMA and recreational department. Beyond the IMA, Presence will consider applying for various seed grants offered by the ASUW, RSO Department, Comparative History of Ideas Undergraduate Program, and other opportunities on campus.

 

Beyond institutional support, the club feels that under difficult circumstances, after Presence is fully established, that some funds could be secured through fundraising on campus. We take the percent of other clubs such as “Campus Animal Rights Educators” (CARE for short), whom have bake sales in order to earn necessary funds while mutually benefiting students on campus with intentional and thoughtful goods.

 

One method of financial sustenance that will not be considered is a club member fee. A club membership fee will not be considered, as we do not want to discriminate participation based on financial status, stigma and privilege.

Environmental Problem:

The primary social sustainability challenge we are facing is emotional regulation and connection with others & ourselves. We would also like to address environmental sustainability by connecting our members with nature via mindful activities in green spaces, and eco-village retreats.

 

Our project addresses emotional regulation and social connection by cultivating a community of vulnerability and acceptance. Meditation is natural way that our members can use to be intentionally present to their emotions, as opposed to finding pleasure in excessive consumption (food, alcohol, drugs, material pleasures). As people consume less, they derive more of their rejuvenation from the nourishment of inner-peace. Human connection and conversation, especially about heartfelt and vulnerable topics, is so immersive that things aren’t as necessary to feel whole.  The most sustainable belief is realizing that the ultimate source of happiness lies within, not externally. In working towards integrating this belief, we hope our community can provide a net of support as we all experience the ups and downs of student life. Presence is a home to our current members.  We hope to expand our capacity and share it to anyone who feels lost or is open to developing a greater sense of belonging.

 

We would also like to include exposure and connection to nature as a part of our club meetings. Some weekly meetings will be held outdoors for meditative walks, or meditation in nature. Additionally, we are planning to host a short retreat this summer at a local eco-village to further understand & find inspiration from self-sustaining communities who live off the land as opposed to relying on consumption.

 

Furthermore, we will explore minimalist lifestyles and concepts among ourselves by sharing media poems, and philosophy excerpts that promote minimalism. In the future, we also hope to partner with minimalists and mindfulness practitioners and encourage them to share their experiences with living minimalistically.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

The impact of Presence will be measured primarily via participant retention. We believe that if membership is constant and participation is self-inspired and voluntary, despite the numerous distractions and obligations of student life, then Presence is accomplishing its goals. Its goals being; to foster community and belonging with emphasis on belonging to one’s self. Ethan and Shelby build personal relationships with each member, and stay in touch with participants to build community as well as build a general awareness of how each participant feels they belong, or what they personally gain from being a part of the group. In these one-on-one conversations, and sometimes group reflections on Presence, we gain feedback about what participants enjoy and dislike. We then take this information and implement it into our structure and plan to ensure that the form of the club is adapting to the participants needs. So far this scale of data collection has sufficed, however in the future when the club grows significantly larger, we will most likely in addition include quiet written reflection time or a short answer survey in order to ensure that Presence is meeting its social and environmental sustainability goals.

Additionally, our impact will be measured by the interest and involvement of members in leadership roles. It is apparent that students gain sense of belonging and long-term dedication if they are eager to play a role in maintaining and furthering the group. The more students prefer to contribute, the more we will take it as a sign that the group is self sustaining and therefor meeting its goals. More and more leadership positions will be extended as the group grows in size.

To maintain social intimacy and vulnerability, Presence will form into smaller groups that build rapport and then may participate in larger whole Presence events. Again this will ensure that communication is tight, each voice is heard among the masses of individuals, and we can maintain and gadge our ability to foster social sustainability. A sign of meeting our intended impact will include relationship building. We expect to see friendships sprout from this club, and intend to provide ample social activity for team building. If relationships are absent, we will have to reconsider our approach.  

Another measurement of Presence’ impact will levels of meditative participation and engagement. This includes the time at meetings in which we explore different exercises. Also reflection and contemplation of such themes during individuals lives outside of the meetings. Presence aims to inspire lifelong practices of mindfulness and awareness, and we will look for signs of these impacts in the stories that students share at group meetings as well as one on one conversation and shares.

Total amount requested from the CSF: $3,289
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Excel file included in other uploads below for formatting issues
Presence Budget through Spring Quarter 2021
ItemUnit CostUnitsTimeTotal CostDescription
Meeting Space: Weekly Hourly Rent$25.001.5 hours60 weeks$2,250
YouTube Red Subscription Monthly Fee$1212 years$250ability to predownload guided meditations to avoid buffering while meditating, access to more guided meditations
Swag: T-shirts, stickers, water bottles$15012 years$150club is recognizable and creates sense of identity/belonging. does not restrict access by asking students to pay for it themselves
Ad expenses: posters, flyers$5012 years$50
Ad expenses: hourly rate for student artist for red square chalk drawings$253 hoursThis Spring$75drawing chalk pathways with meditative art to draw in members. our primary tool for marketing Presence
Eco-village retreat expenses: lodging & gas$25012 years$250as a substitute for meeting over the summer, we will take a trip to an eco-village to inspire ourselves of how to live more minimalistically
Website expense: Wix Premium Monthly Fee$1112 years$264
Total Cost$3,289

Non-CSF Sources:

UW entities for potential funding
UW Resilience Lab
IMA Rec Club Center
Fundraisers
UW Mindfulness Program
Project Completion Total: $3,289

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Market Presence to greater UW public3 weeksMay 24th
Complete Website and begin using MailChimp to send member updates1 weekApril 21st
Plan logistics and date for summer eco-village retreat3 weeksJune 15th
Continue conversations with other UW entities for potential sponsorship/funding4 weeksJune 15th

Matsuri 2019

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Habitat Snags Outreach: Increasing the Urban Forest Health on Campus

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Reusable Containers in Dining Halls

Executive Summary:

The University of Washington prides itself on sustainability. The UW Farm, various rain gardens, and the mail bikes are all strong examples of how the UW promotes a culture of sustainability. The next step is to solve the problem of waste in our dining halls. The 2018 Waste Characterization Study found that 50% of the garbage in Housing & Food Services (HFS) housing contains compostable material. This is a significant issue that costs both the environment and the university. Reducing the amount of compostable containers that our dining halls use will shrink our contribution to landfills and cut the cost of removing trash from the university. The best alternative to disposable containers is a reusable container program. Through an outside company called OZZI, we, as students associated with SEED, a student organization dedicated to educating and advocating for sustainability, plan to introduce a reusable containers program at Center Table in Madrona Hall. This system will work by allowing students to purchase a reusable container, fill it with the food of their choice, return the container to one of two machines, and receive a token. This token would then be presented to dining staff in return for a clean reusable container with their food during their next to go purchase. The machines will collect the containers and HFS Dining staff will then be able to clean them. We have looked into other options, including building an in-house system, but this method is the simplest to implement and maintain. By funding a pilot program for reusable containers in one of the dining halls on campus, you will continue to promote a sustainable culture in our residence halls, promote sustainable habit formation and directly reduce single use, disposable waste.

Student Involvement:

This student driven project would primarily impact UW students living in the residential communities. It would require their involvement in actively using the program by receiving a container, returning it, and replacing it with a new, clean one. In a recent survey of 576 current residents, 52.4% of residents said they would be very likely to participate in a reusable containers program and 29.7% said they were likely to participate. Additionally, 90% of respondents said sustainability was important to them. Given these responses, SEED feels confident that demand for the program exists and that it would be used by residents.

 

Implementing a program like this also reflects UW and HFS’s priority of implementing more sustainable practices. This program would raise students’ awareness of ways to reduce waste and how to make more sustainable choices in their own lives.

 

Student volunteers will be central to informing students of the program and teaching them how to use it. These volunteers can primarily be recruited from SEED membership. SEED currently has over 30 members who are dedicated to the implementation of this program. Other volunteers from Community Councils within the residential communities could also be recruited as needed.

Education & Outreach:

We plan to spread the word about the new reusable container project through several methods. First, we will utilize posters that advertise the new container system and post them throughout the residence halls, dining hall, and other common student spaces. Second, we plan to set up tables near the new reusable container machines with educators in order to educate students on the new system face-to-face. Third, we will hold an event in Center Table, where the machines will be placed, to educate students and ignite excitement about the new program. Also, the pilot program itself is being used to raise awareness and experience about the program before an expanded program is put into place across campus.

 

This program heavily depends on student involvement to be successful. Students can easily start participating in the program by paying a small fee for a container either upfront or included in tuition, with each student paying between $2 and $5. Then, the students will bring back the containers to the dining halls in return them to the collection machines in exchange for a token they can use to receive a new, clean one to receive their meals in. The dining staff will take the used containers and clean them along with the other dishes and utensils used in the dining halls. In order to support this project, it is important that students are responsible with the containers. If students are able to bring back containers regularly and keep them in good condition, they will be supporting the project by helping it flow more smoothly and avoid large problems for the school to deal with, such as running out of containers or having to buy new ones. Additionally, Students Expressing Environmental Dedication (SEED) intends to keep its members involved in the project during its implementation through continued education efforts and tracking program metrics.

Environmental Impact:
  • Food
  • Waste
Project Longevity:

The project teams that will support the implementation, management, and maintenance of this project include:

  • SEED: This team will focus on raising awareness of the program, encouraging student engagement, and soliciting feedback on the program. It will also work with other teams to ensure administrative tasks, such as ordering the machines and having them installed, are completed in a timely manner. SEED will experience a transition in leadership this Spring, and the incoming Executive Director, Jenna Truong, has expressed her commitment to completing and prioritizing this work with her new Executive Board.
  • HFS Dining: This team will support the project by working with HFS Facilities to install machines, train staff on their use and how to distribute containers, complete any needed maintenance on the machines and solicit feedback from staff on the program.
  • HFS Facilities: This team will help with the installation of OZZI machines in dining locations, and ensure their placement complies with HFS policies.
  • RCSA: This team will assist SEED in collecting student feedback on the program. RCSA will experience a transition in leadership this Spring, and the incoming President, Kennedy Cameron, has expressed her commitment to supporting this work with her new Executive Board.

 

Should this project be funded, the most central first step to implementing the program would be ordering the OZZI machines, containers, and supporting materials. This order would be placed immediately after funding is received, and supporting work, such as raising awareness of the program, would also begin immediately.

 

Environmental Problem:

The University of Washington sends tons of compostable material to the industrial composting facility and to the landfill each year. The 2018 Waste Characterization Study found that 50% of the garbage in HFS facilities contains compostable material. The large portion of that waste is generated from the food industry on campus and the to-go containers that are used. This food waste is taking up space in landfills, instead of being turned into usable compost. We recognize that this issue extends beyond our campus and see this program as an opportunity to raise awareness and incentivise sustainable habit formation that our students can take across this campus and beyond.

 

Our project would begin to reduce the number of single use compostable containers that are used and ultimately sent to the composting facility and the landfill. This initial project would serve as a proof of concept for a reusable container program on our campus. We have high expectations for a program of this type as institutions, such as Oregon State, have implemented a reusable container program on their campus and seen significant waste reduction; 60 tons of trash diverted from the landfill every year in the case of Oregon State.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

The impacts of this project can be measured using a handful of metrics. First, we can measure the number of single use reusable containers that are not used. Second, we can track the number of times containers are used and by how many unique students. Third, we can observe the loss rate of containers due to loss, theft and misuse. Finally, we can facilitate feedback from students, dining staff, facilities staff and maintenance personnel which would allow us to gauge satisfaction with the program and determine what improvements are needed to better operate this program.

Total amount requested from the CSF: $40,000
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

All expenses for project
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
1 OZZI machine, 2 O2GO carts, 1,000 tokens and holders, 5 cases of OZZI liner bags, 3000 reusable O2GO cutlery, 1,000 O2GO containers (not including shipping) - requesting funding from CSF for these products$19,7082$39,416
MAXIMUM additional costs (utilities, unforeseen expenses, etc.) - NOT requesting CSF funding for this itemN/AN/A$15,000

Non-CSF Sources:

Potential funding sources
HFS Dining BudgetPotential (not guaranteed) source of funds
Project Completion Total: $55,000

Timeline:

Timeline for project
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
SEED will produce marketing to share with current residents returning to live with HFS in Autumn 2019 outlining the program. This marketing will include the basics of how the system will function, and incentives for their participation.1 monthJune 2019
SEED will facilitate the ordering of the OZZI machines, containers, and supporting materials in collaboration with HFS Dining.1 monthJune 2019
OZZI machines and containers will be placed in dining locations prior to move-in of academic year students.1 or 2 weeksEarly September 2019
Distribute physical marketing, including posters and door hangers, to explain the program to residents.1 weekSeptember 2019
Tabling at dining locations to give tutorials of how to operate the machine, explain the goals of the program, and garner student feedback.2 weeksOctober 2019
Visiting student organizations, including residential community Hall Councils the Residential Community Student Association (RCSA) and RA staffs, to explain the program to community leaders.1 weekOctober 2019
Conclusion of the pilot program at the end of Autumn Quarter 2019: SEED will solicit student feedback on their experience with the program and ideas for areas of improvement. SEED will also partner with HFS Dining to solicit feedback from dining employees and maintenance staff to better understand the implementation of the program, and potential areas of improvement. We will compile this qualitative feedback with quantitative data on usage from the machines to analyze the program’s impact. This analysis will include number of unique users, how usage varies between dining locations, trends over time in usage, and an approximation of the quantity of waste diverted by the program.2 weeksDecember 2019
SEED will present the findings of its analysis of the pilot program to HFS’s Sustainability Committee, RCSA, and senior leadership in HFS’s dining department. Based on its analysis, it will make recommendations for what changes to the program should be made to make it more effective and sustainable, and a proposed timeline for implementing a permanent program.1 or 2 weeksJanuary 2019

Project Approval Forms:

Kinetic Light-up Crosswalks: Phase 1

Executive Summary:

This project draws on interdisciplinary expertise and creativity in developing luminaire speed bumps powered by solar energy to sustainably and innovatively improve safety at the University of Washington (UW) Seattle Campus. Ultimately, we want to implement the highest performing prototype to the most trafficked, least illuminated paths on campus to keep students, faculty, and staff safe. Addressing the UW’s Campus Landscape Framework objective of creating connections across the “mosaic” of the Central Campus, this prototype will improve circulation through an iconic landscape, create a unique experience, increase safety, and create opportunities for collaboration between students and industry partners. 

A hybrid solar system, meaning a system that can be both off-grid and grid-tied depending on conditions and need, will be used to power luminaires embedded in a temporary, modular speed bump. This reliably improves safety and visibility without permanently changing roadways. The modular configuration also facilitates maintenance and flexibility. 

These speed bumps would be located at different points of the Burke Gilman trail so when feet, wheelchairs, or bicycles pass over them a sensor will be triggered and spot illumination will be delivered almost instantly. The greatest load to pass over these speed bumps will be small campus vehicles, materials will be selected based on their load carrying capacity. 

Student Involvement:

 

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT
We are advocating for student involvement at every point and every level of the project. It is a student run team that is designing for students. We are inclusive, always willing to include other disciplines and expertise. Additionally, we envision the long-term management and maintenance of this project to be conducted and funded by the work of a future student team. There is potential for this to be carried out in an interdisciplinary studio similar to the McKinnely Futures Studio offered by the College of Built Environments.

At this stage of the project, we are looking for undergraduates and graduates that are interested
in the development and prototyping of the project (see outreach section above). Though, we are
a team predominantly of graduate students and PhD students, we offer a unique opportunity for
undergraduates. If we were to have interested undergraduates in the fields mentioned in the previous
section on Outreach, we would offer a mentorship component to the project, especially if they are
at the beginning of their university experience. We would then benefit from a fresh perspective and
they from experience. We are hoping to foster relationships with UW Solar and Engineers Without
Borders. In this way, we are truly inclusive.

In terms of affecting students, faculty, and staff at the University of Washington, as previously
mentioned, this project will increase safety and awareness of pedestrians at crosswalks. This is a
large issue with a large rippling effect of behavior change. We want our campus to be as safe as
possible.

Education & Outreach:

Behavior change: Providing luminous circulation and connection throughout the UW campus, regardless of weather conditions or damage to the grid, will likely help pedestrians feel more secure and independent, while cyclists and drivers will be alerted to movement around them. 

Outreach: This project will provide the student team first-hand experience in product development, fabrication, and prototype testing (before proceeding down the implementation route). It will support the efforts of the university to improve the campus’ experiential qualities; update, control, and maintain campus lighting; and ensuring that campus users feel safe. As a team we have done individual, department, and mass outreach (not only to find more students to participate on our team, but also to bring awareness to this new safety approach). We have sent out advertisements for more team members to the Graduate and Professional Student Senate (GPSS), Associated Students of the University of Washington (ASUW), the Mechanical Engineering Department, the Electrical Engineering Department, Applied Math Department, Civil Engineering Department, Construction Management Department, Computer Science Department, Materials Sciences Department, Architecture Department, Urban Planning: Transportation Planning, and the Landscape Architecture Department. 

Education: Students will be exposed to unprecedented sustainable technology applications and the learning opportunities that come with its operation. Additionally, the larger UW community will act as a testing ground for revolutionary infrastructure. The system will need to be inspected and maintained, this too will provide data collection and technology optimization opportunities. This project also builds on the Campus Illumination Roadmap previously supported by Campus Sustainability Fund, and could be included in their research. 

 

Environmental Impact:
  • Energy Use
  • Transportation
  • Environmental Justice
  • Community Development
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

The UW campus has some paths where students feel unsafe at night due to poor lighting. Furthermore, due to Seattle’s weather and geographic location, it is often dark during key commuting hours. Campus safety for pedestrians is particularly important as many students, at UW and other colleges, choose walking as their primary mode of transit. Lack of safety in areas of high traffic, mixed-mode transportation can not only lead to physical injuries, but potentially a culture of distrust and fear detrimental to a sense of community or an atmosphere of solidarity. From a broader perspective, implementing adequate lighting infrastructure can be difficult in marginalized, low income, or rural communities since the costs of streetlight hardware, connection to the grid, and maintenance are often prohibitive. The expense of car ownership leads more people to walk or bike across longer distances, making safe crosswalks even more vital. Additionally, electricity from the grid can come from non-renewable sources, such as coal or natural, and it can be difficult for a local community to find an option for their street lighting that is powered by renewable energy.

ADDRESSING SUSTAINABILITY
The utilization of LED technology results in greater longevity and energy efficiency, with less energy loss to heat, than other sources of light- providing adequate lighting for users without dramatically disrupting surrounding ecosystems. The lighting technology will harvest and store its own energy, releasing fewer greenhouse gases than coal-powered electric grids. The lighting system has the capability to rely on the grid in the event of solar power failure. The controller will need to rely on external power, which for the time being is grid-tied. This prototype will also address the social/cultural sustainability aspects of road safety. Currently, the impacts of a night time accident are disproportionately higher for pedestrians than for drivers or cyclists. By creating better lighting at crosswalks, safety is improved in a more equitable fashion,
regardless of transportation choice. Accompanying this technology is the need for education and training on its maintenance and benefits. This would allow open dialogue and information exchange, empowering communities and allowing the technology to be culturally relevant. Finally, while this project’s focus is to increase safe mobility, it will do so while ensuring environmental safety. In selecting products and materials, we willl make our best efforts to exclude “Red Listed” materials. The Red List was developed by the International Living Futures Institute and catalogues chemicals known to have hazardous effects on human, animal, and environmental health, e.g. lead, BPA, cadmium, mercury, etc. We will consider the potential for off-gassing, leaching, or leaking when we develop the component. Toxicity is a great concern to the project team, and safeguarding against it for all direct and indirect users is essential.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

This project will make use of a tool that is often used in sustainability evaluation: triple bottom-line analysis. The project will be examined according to its environmental impacts, its social impacts, and its economic impacts. 

The main environmental targets of this project included reducing GHGs through alternative energy; consequently, we would like to estimate the decrease in GHGs caused by switching from a conventionally powered electrical to the new technology as closely as possible using available research. The prototype will be evaluated to see its positive benefits.The average monthly energy usage will also be calculated along with the efficiency and life span of the prototypes. Another key environmental indicator that will be measured is light output (in lux). The light output will then be used to determine the extent to which the prototypes reduce light pollution and to ensure that the light provided is not overly disruptive of animal habitat. 

For the second portion of the triple bottom line analysis, a number of social indicators will be examined. We hope to conduct a survey pre- and post- prototype installation to ask students how safe they feel at the test locations and which mode of transport they use. This survey will be useful in prototype refinement and in ensuring that pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorists all feel safe at the installation locations. We will also measure the number of accidents at the prototype sites to further evaluate safety, with a particular emphasis on pedestrians. 

The economic impacts and economic sustainability of this project are vital, as the technology will hopefully be used both at UW, in Seattle, and in more marginalized communities. The costs to build and maintain the prototypes will be evaluated with an eye towards making the technology as cheap as possible while still maintaining quality and functionality.

 

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Ethnoforestry: Applying and integrating a new model of ecosystem sustainability on campus

Executive Summary:

Over the course of the last year, the Olympic Natural Resources Center (ONRC) has piloted the discipline of ethnoforestry on campus, bringing together a wide range of of the UW community, from undergraduates to alumni, and from across majors to enhance sustainability on our campus and showcase a different methodology of ecosystem management and health. Ethnoforestry uses knowledge from local people and applies this to ecosystem management. This project utilizes a new framework that gives equal weight to both community wellbeing and environmental wellbeing to create a more holistic form of ecosystem sustainability. Through a CSF grant for the 2018-19 academic year, we have been able to develop a wide range of projects including creating ethnoforestry garden beds on campus, developing raised beds to grow culturally important plant species, creating a capstone and internship program, and more. Through this effort, we have hosted 9 work parties this year where we have engaged 22 volunteers that have contributed 59 hours to enhance sustainability on our campus. In addition, interns have spent over 120 hours this year learning applied ethnoforestry, enhancing their skill sets, and become leaders in inclusive ecosystem management.

 

This next CSF grant would allow us to continue to build on our existing projects, create additional opportunities for students, and allow UW to become the leaders in this field. This project would address several of CSF’s key sustainability impact initiatives including living systems and biodiversity, environmental justice, community development, and cultural representation. A key component of this work is its interdisciplinary nature. We will continue to build our relationships with our important UW partners including the Center for Urban Horticulture, UW Grounds, and the Intellectual House.

 

Next year, we will expand our ethnoforestry garden beds on main campus by adding additional plants to our Paccar/Dempsey Hall site and developing at least one more garden bed in partnership with UW Grounds that will be dedicated to tribes in our region. With this grant, we will be able to wrap up this project and turn over maintenance of the sites to UW Grounds. In addition, we will finish propagating plants in our raised beds and install them on campus or move them to our ONRC nursery.

 

In addition, this grant will be used to connect with tribal students on campus to determine which plants species they have typically utilized and want to see represented on campus. This will give a space for people to voice their input and ensure each student is incorporated into this project. This grant would be used to fund one graduate student position in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences for one quarter during the academic year (as an RA position) and Summer Quarter 2020 (at an hourly rate). This person will spearhead all projects on campus, oversee intern and capstone students, and continue to develop this discipline. With one more round of CSF funding, we will be able to finish our existing projects, execute new initiatives, and solidify our presence on campus.

Student Involvement:

This project has always been, and will continue to be, a student run initiative that encourages participation from people studying environmental science to business and everything in between. If our expectation is that professionals will incorporate traditional knowledge, the voices and needs of a local community, and sustainability into their careers, then teaching this in an applied way needs to start at the university level. UW is at the forefront of this movement and our goal is to generate opportunities that bring students together to learn, participate, and engage. This will allow for greater collaboration and learning of this model.  

Throughout next year, we will continue to host work parties both on main campus and at the Center for Urban Horticulture where students can participate in one-time volunteer events. Through this, they will hear about the scope of this ethnoforestry work and practice these skills in an applied setting. This could be anything from transplanting seedlings to removing invasive species on our campus to installing or harvesting culturally significant plants. These opportunities have allowed students to take ownership in the project and actively contribute to sustainability on our campus. Each work party we have hosted this year has had at least one brand new volunteer that has never been engaged with this project before. There is a clear interest and need for this work on our campus and we are committed to extending our reach with this new CSF grant.

In addition, we have had outstanding interns and capstone students throughout this year that have played an active role in making this project successful. With this new CSF grant, we would take on one to two interns per quarter during the academic year and up to five interns in Summer Quarter 2020. The Summer Quarter interns will have the unique experience of working at the Olympic Natural Resources Center on applied ethnoforestry projects including working in the upcoming ONRC nursery being installed in the coming months and taking part in an ethnoforestry study on the western side of the Olympic Peninsula. This will allow for students to understand how this work could apply in a different setting away from main campus. For students who would like to integrate traditional ecological knowledge and community wellbeing into their future careers, this will be a tremendous opportunity for them. For students interested in hands-on work during the academic year, we will offer capstone projects where students can answer ethnoforestry questions that sparks their interest. 

Finally, we will be conducting interviews with any tribal students who would like to participate. Throughout this year, we have been developing ethnoforestry garden beds that will be dedicated to tribes across the region. By talking directly with tribal students, we will receive input on plant species they would like to see representing their tribe or family. These species will be integrated into our planting plans so tribal students would have access to this plant material throughout the year, allowing them to continue traditions they perhaps cannot usually do on campus and to create campus green spaces that is valuing their knowledge and perspective.    

We believe that sustainability is more than just restoration or water use reduction or green technology. It is about inspiring students on our campus to become leaders in this sustainability movement. Through our work, we will continue to provide spaces where every UW student feels welcome to join our project.

Education & Outreach:

We have worked hard this year to develop effective ways to promote our events and opportunities. We have partnered with the Society of Ecological Restoration- UW Chapter to highlight upcoming work parties or internship opportunities through their weekly email blasts to their listserv. Additionally, the School of Environmental and Forest Science (SEFS) regularly emails all undergraduate and graduate students about ethnoforestry events. Finally, we have collected email addresses for every person who has participated in a volunteer event and regularly reach out to inform them of any work parties. All of these methods will continue into next year and will help to build our volunteer base. We will work to find at least five more groups or listservs to post our events for next year to reach an even greater number of students. We will also utilize an equity and inclusion toolkit when developing our marketing and outreach material to ensure that it promotes and encourages diversity and equitability.

 

ONRC has been working on creating a social media presence to increase our reach throughout campus. In the coming months, we will be revamping our Facebook page and establishing an Instagram account. We will use this to promote ethnoforestry updates, work parties, and internship/capstone opportunities. We would like to continue attending events to promote the ethnoforestry project including the CSF Mixers and other sustainability events on campus. This has been a terrific way to reach a wider audience and we see tremendous value in each of these events. We would like to attend at least one new workshop, conference, or mixer next year to reach a wider audience.

 

Through these efforts, we would like to see an additional 30 new volunteers attend a work party or engage with the project. Based on our current trajectory, we believe that is certainly possible and would bring our total number of volunteers to over 50. This increase will mean that even more students will have an opportunity to learn a wide range of skills they would not otherwise receive at UW. There is no other interdisciplinary program like this on our campus or in the region, creating a very unique and accessible opportunity. Students can have a wide range of involvement based on their interest from attending a one-time volunteer event to having a summer-long internship or anything in between.

Environmental Impact:
  • Living Systems and Biodiversity
  • Environmental Justice
  • Community Development
  • Cultural Representation
Project Longevity:

We fully expect most of these projects to be wrapped up by the end of Summer 2020. With this final round of funding, we hope to build on our current momentum to expand and finish our projects. Our ethnoforestry garden beds will have culturally important plant species installed and future maintenance of the site will be turned over to UW Grounds. By the end of Summer 2020, plants growing in our raised beds will be planted on campus or moved to the ONRC nursery.

 

We have already received funding from UW’s joint grant program between the Population Health Department and EarthLab that will fund two quarters for one RA position in the 2019-2020 academic year, travel to and from the Olympic Peninsula to visit each coastal tribe, lodging at ONRC, and supplies. This funding will be directly applied to the research components of this project and will help to increase its reach. It will also aid in the longevity of the project by funding permanent research plots and supplies for measurements.

 

In addition, ONRC has requested funding from the Washington State Legislature and it is currently in the State Senate budget awaiting a signature by Governor Inslee. This funding would go towards a new watershed study on the Olympic Peninsula in collaboration with the WA Department of Natural Resources. A portion of this would go directly towards future ethnoforestry research and projects. Also, the US Forest Service PNW Research Station has allocated funds towards this study with up to five thousand dollars going directly to ethnoforestry field studies. This will help tremendously with future funding of this project, especially as the on-campus projects wrap up at the end of Summer 2020 and the research component on the Olympic Peninsula continues.

Environmental Problem:

In forest and ecosystem management there is often very little value placed on incorporating traditional knowledge and the needs of local communities, both tribal and non-tribal, are often not addressed. In order to have both thriving forests and people, it is crucial that management framework change. Ethnoforestry can be a key solution to this issue by incorporating knowledge by local people. There are numerous plant species that are culturally significant to tribes across the region. Although, many of these plants are declining in abundance in the wild due to overharvesting and forest management strategies that do not promote these plants. Through this project, we have, and will continue to, engage students in this work to create future leaders that can work in an interdisciplinary way to achieve sustainability.

 Our ethnoforestry garden beds on campus are a great example of applied ethnoforestry where culturally important plants are installed and can be harvested by the UW community. These species are adding to the health and wellbeing of that environment while also providing plant material for UW students who want to utilize these plants. This showcases the concept of ethnoforestry while also adding to the overall sustainability of our campus.

In order to create a project that is inclusive and representative, we will be interviewing tribal students to learn what plant species they would like to see and use on campus. By building and strengthening these relationships, we can create a project that promotes diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

This project will measure success using a variety of metrics. We would like to see at least 30 new volunteers next year attending work parties, interning, or as capstone students. We would like to have at least one to two interns per quarter and five interns during Summer Quarter 2020. Interns during the academic year will each put in 90 hours of work per quarter while summer interns will each put in 200 hours per quarter or 1,000 hours collectively. This is a tremendous amount of time each student will have to learn and practice ethnoforestry. This will certainly set them up to be successful professionals that value inclusion and promote a different framework of ecosystem sustainability that includes both community and environmental wellbeing. We would also like to interview at least 15 tribal students on campus to ensure their voice is being heard and their knowledge is incorporated into our management strategies.

We will expand the number of raised beds used and increase the quantity of plant species grown. This will allow us to grow more plants for both our main campus ethnoforestry garden beds and for our ONRC nursery. We will host at least three workshops at the ONRC nursery during Spring and Summer 2020 to bring together UW students and tribal members for collaborative plant production lessons.

Total amount requested from the CSF: $48,694
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Ethnoforestry Project Proposed Budget
Item Description Cost
Student Funding
One graduate student position Funding for one graduate student position including an RA position for one quarter and an hourly rate for Summer 2020. This includes salary, tuition, and benefits $34,994
5 undergraduate interns for Summer 2020Interns will be compensated with $200/personper week and 2 internship credits per person$8,056
Travel and Lodging
Travel to/from ONRC 6 trips to/from ONRC for graduate student position including gas and ferries$1,081
Lodging at ONRCLodging for summer (graduate student and five interns)$1,603
Travel to/ from site daily Travel to and from ethnoforestry site each day $560
Plant Production Supplies
Supplies for plant production Supplies include soil, pots, seeds, fertilizer, bleach, filter paper, etc. $1,400
Ethnoforestry garden beds
Plants Purchasing plants for the ethnoforestry gardenbeds on campus$500
Signage Signs for plants installed on campus $500
Total$48,694

Non-CSF Sources:

This details grants that we have already secured and funding sources we expect to receive. The total below reflects all values.
Source Amount Status
UW's Population Health/ EarthLab $32,749Received
ONRC Match to UW Population Health/ Earth Lab grant $25,000 Will Match
US Forest Service $5,000Pursuing, but will most likely receive
WA State Legislature TBD Pursuing
Project Completion Total: $62,749

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Additional plantings at our first ethnoforestry site 1 monthEnd of Spring Quarter 2020
Creating a second ethnoforestry bed 3 months End of Summer Quarter 2020
Interviewing tribal students on campus3-6 months End of Summer Quarter 2020
Creating additional raised beds3 months End of Summer Quarter 2020
Hosting up to three workshops at the ONRC nursery 4-5 months End of Summer Quarter 2020

Project Approval Forms:

Native Greenroof Sculpture

Executive Summary:

This feasibility study for Native Green Roof Sculpture has been developed in order to acquire site analysis and engineering/architectural consultation for the future development of the native plant (waterwise) green roof architectural structure on the UW campus.

For this study, I will gather pertinent architectural, ecological and artistic consultation for site/project development and approval. I will be working in collaboration with Landscape Architect Kristine Kenney and with campus art administrator Jaclynn Eckhardt. Sound engineering will also be crucial for the success and safety of this living structure. In regards to this, I will seek consultation and design approval from the Campus Engineering Services as well final legal approval of design from an outside firm.

Collaboration and communication, specifically with the School of Art and the College of Built Environment will also be needed in order to represent and market the projects intentions effectively. In regards to this, all pertinent connections will be made in order to complete the final project proposal with design and specs for the September CSF Grant period.

Project Description: Native Green roof sculpture will be a large environmentally driven abstract structure, built with sustainable and integral materials and implemented with a water wise native plant green roof. The bold and colorful outdoor structure will be designed so one can actively engage with it from all aspects. Colorful glazed ceramic, molded concrete, salvaged steel and greenery will be used in an open and dimensional fashion. Structural pillars will be sculpted with integrity and add interest to all sides. Walking under the structure one will see an organic ceramic design molded into the underside of the roof. The unique and free design of the green roof will provide invigorating shape, form, plant life, and texture found nowhere else on campus.

Indigenous climate adapted plants will be incorporated in the roof top garden and in other unexpected areas of the sculpture. A requirement of only a two-year establishment period of summer watering will ensure that the plants can sustain themselves with no supplemental water post establishment. Sedum, grass, native flowers and other low water plants will be selected in partnership with the Center for Urban Horticulture at the University. A plaque will be incorporated to narrate the green roofs innovation and purpose.

As we live in such a digital and formally built world today, this green roof will create a place of relief, providing people with something invigorating, natural and tactile. Walking the line of sculpture, architecture and ecology, this unique living art piece will invite people to see the blended connection that nature, art and education can have in within built environment.

Student Involvement:

As a Seattle native and a graduate Student in the 3D4M program, I care deeply about the innovation and creative representation of Seattle’s urban landscape. With my time at UW I have specifically been developing sculptural design, material studies and research relating to the creation of structures that incorporate sustainable ecology and are designed for the built environment.

To have the opportunity to build this project in a collaborative and foundational university environment would not only be something that fosters professional skills for myself, but will also be something that will inspire other students and faculty to engage in the development of more, present and future innovative projects and ideas within the University setting and the greater city as whole.

With this being said, student participation and faculty involvement is a must. For the final project proposal I plan to create a budget, which allows for two art/built environment undergraduate students to help with the building process, e.g. design, ceramic construction, metal fabrication and or consultation.

Along with project participation, Conversation with the School of Art and College of Built environment will help represent/market the projects mission and development to the student body even more effectively.

 

Education & Outreach:

Education and project impact will be crucial to visually represent and market through the projects process/development and as well with the completed design of green roof structure.

During the developmental period of the project, I will work with the College of built environment, and programs like Green Futures Lab and Climate Action Plan to establish proper representation of the status of the projects climate goals and innovation. Consultation and collaboration with Landscape Architect, Kristine Kenney will also help facilitate proper outcome and exposure of the piece for the University.

Because the structure will be a permanent public art piece for the UW campus, I will also be consulting with Jaclynn Eckhardt, campus art administrator and with UW School of Art to create a plan, which highlights the projects unique design, site impact, building process, collaboration and overall outcome.

I will be working closely with faculty advisors Amie McNeel, Mark Zirppel and 3D4M chair Doug Jeck, as well working with Jaclynn Eckhardt, campus Art Administrator to set a tactful plan to find an impactful site location for the best representation of the green structure on campus.

 

With the completion of the project, a budget will be set for the execution of a well designed educational plaque which states the green structures use of native xeriscaped plants, incorporation of repurposed material, and its cultural support for the arts in the UW community.

 

Environmental Impact:
  • Energy Use
  • Living Systems and Biodiversity
  • Waste
  • Water
  • Environmental Justice
  • Community Development
  • Cultural Representation
Project Longevity:

This feasibility study will take place from now until late August, when the Final project proposal is due in September. With this in mind, I will be taking time to connect with the potential stakeholders in order to gain pertinent information that will ensure the success of the construction of the green roof.

The study will be broken into 3 different stages.

 

Stage 1: Initial design and consultation. $25/hr + 20.9%, 25 hours, total $755

Stage 2: Adapted design, working with consultants to create professional licensed plans.   $25/hr + 20.9%, 40 hours, total $1,210

Stage 3: Drafting and attainment of documents and implementation strategy.

$25/hr + 20.9%, 25 hours, total $755

Engineering: (structural consultation) review of design and feasibility.  $3,000.

Environmental Problem:

Because of the structure’s multifaceted design, holding purpose as a green roof and a public art structure, I the project accomplishes both environmental sustainability and the sustainability and innovation of arts and culture within the UW community and as well Seattle.

With the Green roof having a xeriscaped (zero water) design, meaning that after a two-year establishment plan, it will need no supplemental water, it will be making a clear statement in support for both low water simple green roof designs, xeriscaping and native planting.

As for the two-year establishment plan, live planting will be done in the fall, bulbs will establish with winter water, and all seeds will be set in early spring. Plants included will be all native to Western Washington, selected for their supreme drought tolerance and success in green roof implementation.

In regards to site location, it will be important to bring the large sculpture to a place where the green roof can be implemented in a place that will truly benefit from having greenery and art. Through site analysis and research, a location that answers to both environmental need and design need, will be found. ADA requirements will be considered and executed ensuring that the piece meets proper engineering, safety, and accessibility requirements.

As for material sustainability, UW Sculpture faculty and Sculpture Tech Andy Fallet will ensure that longevity is set in the overall design not only that, repurposed steel will be used for aesthetic and integral integration.

Sustainability will also be meet within an artistic and socially impactful way. The colorful green roof sculpture will be built with community in mind hoping to create an uplifting piece for students to engage with and commune around. Young artists, builders, students, athletes, environmentalists and arts appreciators will not only be shown a beautiful art piece, but will experience a unique and new green sculpture, in which showcases the connection that ecology and art can have within the built environment.

 

 

 

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Compared to technical systems in which showcase green designs, i.e. green walls with pumps and circuit sensors, the use of a xeriscaped green roof is not only low cost and low tech, but once established is designed to have minimal, if not any upkeep. From research of other designs, especially from urban green roof structures I have seen tremendous results with simple xeriscaped plantings, which support plants without irrigation.

Through research and analysis with Landscape Architect Kristine Kenney and with plant consultation from the Center for Urban Horticulture, I will work to make sure that a functional and proper design of the structure is met ensuring that the green roof successfully functions as a xeriscaped garden.

Sustainability will also be measured through quality of design and structural integrity. This is why it is beneficial to receive proper guidance from engineers, sculpture faculty and technicians.

The green roof will also highlight the much-needed use for softscaping (planting areas) in the city environment. The implementation of the green structure in a concrete environment will benefit the city environment not only by preventing dirty rainwater from entering the sewer, but also will provide an innovative and creative application of plant integration and greenery to an otherwise concrete (hardscaped) site.

Total amount requested from the CSF: $5,720
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

stage 1 initial design and consultation.$25/hr plus 20.9% benefits25 hrs$755
Engineering (structural consultation) review of design and feasibility.$3,0001$3,000
stage 2 adapted design, consultantion on creation with professional licensed plans.$25/hr plus 20.9% benefits25 hrs$755
Stage 3 drafting of documents for implementation strategy.$25/hr plus 20.9% benefits40hrs$1,210

Non-CSF Sources:

Design Consultation from Kristine Kenneyin kind
Artistic and site consultation Jaclynn Eckhardtin kind
Faculty Guideance and support Amie McNeel, Mark Zirpel and Doug Jeckin kind
Consultation from University of Washington Engineering Servicesin kind
Artist Trust: Grants for Artists Projects$1,500
Project Completion Total: $5,720

Timeline:

stage 1 initial design and consultation.May-AugustJune/July
stage 2 adapted design, consultantion on creation with professional licensed plans.May-AugustJune/July
Stage 3 drafting of documents for implementation strategy.May-AugustJuly/August
Engineering (structural consultation) review of design and feasibility.May-AugustAugust

Native Gardens at UW Farm

Executive Summary:

The proposed project will be a collaboration between the UW Farm and the Intellectual House as well as other Native American groups on campus and in the community as we work together to design and plant gardens of indigenous plants with significance in native food traditions.

 

The proposed project would provide on-campus space(s) for students involved with the Intellectual House to plant, grow learn and have access to culturally significant foods as a form of social sustainability and food sustainability:

  • wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ Garden at Mercer Court farm site would be at the intersection of Pacific and Boat Streets: “B” plot, measurements: 75’ x16’, Currently vacant – no plants growing there.
  • wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ Garden at the Center for Urban Horticulture would be the current “I” Plot, measures 20’ x 30’
  • Native (perennial) Permaculture garden - Renovating a previous CSF-funded permaculture planting with native perennial plants, 40’x15’.

 

This project addresses a number of issues related to social and environmental sustainability on the UW campus:

 

  1. Food Sovereignty. Food sovereignty is defined as the “(inherent)right of peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems. It puts the aspirations and needs of those who produce, distribute and consume food at the heart of food systems and policies rather than the demands of markets and corporations.” – Declaration of Nyéléni, the first global forum on food sovereignty, Mali, 2007

 

As one step towards food sovereignty for the UW community, we hope to help create spaces where students, staff, faculty, and community members can learn about, grow, and consume traditional foods.

2.This project also addresses issues of food insecurity and native peoples. Food insecurity “is a growing public health problem for college students, with significant potential for adverse effects on both physical and mental health, and functioning. Food insecurity is defined as, “limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe food or limited or uncertain ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways” due to a lack of money or other resources.” – American Journal of Public Health Student hunger on campus: Food insecurity among college students and implications for academic institutions

 

  1. This project will contribute to biodiversity and restoration by reintroducing native plant species to the UW campus at two of the UW Farm’s growing sites. It will specifically focus on the reintroduction of edible and medicinal plant species, addressing food sovereignty, food insecurity, access to healthy foods, and will increase amount of food grown on campus. These activities address social and environmental sustainability issues.

 

  1. This project will focus heavily on student leadership. UW Farm employs several student workers each year. The farm will hire a Native Garden Liaison position to work directly with members of the Intellectual House. The Intellectual House is able to hire students for Native Garden work. We plan to engage with Native American student groups on campus and envision this space to truly be student-created and led.

 

  1. This project will focus on engaging Native American campus and community members to share knowledge, stories, song, and tradition among generations. The Native Gardens will also be the site for larger educational events that could bring in students from all backgrounds to learn about food sovereignty, indigenous foods, food security, social sustainability and the history of the Puget Sound land and peoples.

 

UW Farm has met with partners at the Intellectual House to discuss the feasibility of this project. With the Intellectual House and UW Farm’s ability to devote funds to hire student leaders, we can ensure commitment and continued work on this project in the future. Cultivating this garden on UW Farm’s space also ensures continued maintenance of the space by UW Farm staff and student volunteers. The UW Farm also has a system for liability, food safety protocols and harvest tools and food storage. The Intellectual House has a cooking facility, food storage and areas for teaching food cooking lessons. Both facilities have space for saving seeds and hosting events.

Student Involvement:

Food grown at the Gardens will directly solve problems of food insecurity at the Intellectual House.

Cultural traditions related to food for tribes will be preserved through active sharing of indigenous recipes, medicinal knowledge, tribal planting and harvest methods, and significant plant varieties and their seed will be kept alive through living specimens and seed saving.

Students participating in the growing of crops and caring for perennial plants will learn-hands-on about how to grow food for themselves and will at the very least take home an awareness of food and social sustainability issues.

Carlson Center is the largest source for the project, along with Intellectual House members. The UW Farm hosts, on average 60 service-learning volunteers per quarter including the summer. In addition, we recruit many more via the UW ‘Trumba’ on-line calendar, facebook (3,500 followers), Instagram (1,400 followers), our weekly newsletter (1,349 subscribers), website page and foot traffic thru and by the farm sites every day. We also have over 50 active volunteers from the community that are students, recent alumni and individuals.

Education & Outreach:

a.     How will the UW community find out about your project?

  • Update UW Farm and Intellectual House websites to include grant projects tab and list all CSF projects including this one
  • Utilize UW Farm and Intellectual House facebook pages and Instagram accounts for publicity and documentation of progress and involvement
  • Include updates and involvement activities via The Weekly Dirt farm newsletter to document and publicize progress, including tribal recipes and crops 
  • Attend campus events (tabling) such as Earth Day and Dawg Daze to promote program

b.     How will the UW community become involved in and/or support your project?

 

The UW Farm and Intellectual House will co-host three annual events for hands-on learning to educate, feed, empower and involve students/campus/the public about this project:

  • Indigenous Food and Ecological Knowledge Symposium, every April
  • NEW Dawg Daze involvement – host Share in the Harvest, every September, harvest team participation and preparing a community meal at the Intellectual House
  • Farm To Table community meal event hosted by UW Farm every year in late October with seed saving activities

 

In addition, there are over 15 classes (over 500 students) that intersect with related topics that visit the farm, have labs, and come for field trips to learn more about biodiversity, indigenous crops and traditions, food access, nutrition, farming, etc.

 

Over 240 Service-Learners per year help on the farm as part of class assignments. They would be involved via the Carlson Center but are all supervised on UW Farm sites.

 

The UW Farm and Intellectual House together are visited by many individuals. Both organizations host volunteer work parties, have an open-door policy for those that visit for personal reasons or for work, participate in events such as MLK Day of Service, CSA shareholders, alumni, conferencing, meetings, events, etc. - we are places that are open to the public and welcome involvement

 

Farm Field Trip Youth education programs led by UWBG staff at CUH every April-May and Sept-October. This totals approximately 200+ k-4 youth and local K-4 teachers that will learn about native cultures, foods, etc.

 

Intellectual House educational activities are numerous. This project dovetails into events seamlessly.

 

Estimated exposure due to the website information, permanent signage, annual work parties and events: 40,000+ people

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Timeline:

  • Spring 2019: Submit LOI to CSF committee.
  • July 2019: Hold Community Meeting/ceremony with tribal Elders and on-campus project partners. Lunch provided, gifts provided to Elders. Estimated attendance: 15-35 people. Activities - Storytelling, Educational activities, Initial site designs for Mercer Court plot and the improvement/renovation of the permaculture site at CUH.
  • August & September 2019: Finalize garden designs, signage, educational content for websites, plan harvest and cooking events for fall quarter, educational materials design, production and harvest timelines, procurement of plants, purchase of hardscaping materials.
  • October & November 2019: Students, volunteers, farm manager and Intellectual house members install native gardens and signage at Mercer Court and CUH. Information and participation created due to a kick-off event during Dawg Daze. Storytelling at the Intellectual House and tours of Native garden sites and sampling foods grown in 2019 from current sites. Estimated attendance, 35-55 people. Also, over the following 8 weeks, the UW Farm will host 8 work parties to complete the work as recruited through the Intellectual House and Carlson’s Service-Learning program. Estimated attendance: 50-75 people.            
  • Ongoing, post grant: Continued involvement of community partners and UW Farm students/interns/volunteers to maintain the garden spaces. Ongoing community events, medicinal and crop harvests and meals, that allow students involved in farming and sustainability to connect with and learn from Native People and learn about the cultivation and significance of indigenous foods. See below.

Environmental Problem:

3.     Sustainable Impact

a.     The sustainability problem (statement of need), be sure to discuss the local context of the problem if your project addresses a broader sustainability concern

Food Sovereignty is defined as “the inherent right of a community to identify their own food system”. As one step towards food sovereignty for the UW community, we hope to help create spaces where students, staff, faculty, and community members can learn about, grow, and consume traditional foods.

b.     How your project addresses the sustainability problem

This project will contribute to biodiversity and restoration by reintroducing native plant species to the UW campus at two of the UW Farm’s growing sites. It will specifically focus on the reintroduction of edible and medicinal plant species, addressing food sovereignty, food insecurity, access to healthy foods, and will increase amount of food grown on campus. These activities address social and environmental sustainability issues.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Measuring will occur through recording the following data:

Volunteer hours – all time contributed to building gardens, planting, growing produce, harvests and working on the plots is recorded in a Volunteer log. Total hours, # of students and demographics will be collected via a sign-up questionnaire (have this on the farm page already).

Harvest amounts - All produce grown will be weighed and recorded into records for the UW Farm and shared with the Intellectual house. Written as part of Farm’s annual report and shared with campus/public. For example, in 2018 5 lbs. of Ozette potatoes were grown at Mercer Court. This lead to 80 lbs. of potatoes that were harvested along with 128 pounds of Dakota squash from 25 seeds.

# of individuals in attendance each year at the three annual educational events (Symposium, Dawg Daze, Farm To Table) that will be part of this project.

# of Indigenous Recipes collected for incorporation into the UW Farm Newsletter as shared by the Intellectual House, to campus/public, archived on websites

# and Varieties of plant seeds saved and success of seed saving recorded each year

Total amount requested from the CSF: $14,405
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total: $14,405

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

UW-APL Clean Propulsion

Executive Summary:

The UW Applied Physics Laboratory is asking the Campus Sustainability Fund for $28,350 to purchase an electric propulsion system from PureWaterCraft and hydraulic steering controls. Funds from this grant will be used to bring a new technology into the UW Applied Physics Laboratory which we could not do without being awarded a grant or contract specifically requiring it. Optionally, a system supporting smaller hulls could be purchased for $19850 if the committee prefers.

An Applied Physics Laboratory student team, working with Engineers from UW APL and PureWaterCraft, will design a mounting and control system which will allow the motor and battery pack to move easily between a multitude of hull types such as a Rigid-Hulled Inflatable Boat (RHIB) and a Whaler style hull. The RHIB install will be set up for transport to remote locations for rapid deployment in fragile environments. The control systems will enable remote or autonomous control of the vessel for future research and development of autonomous systems and obstacle avoidance which will be used for future student projects.

Both hulls will be clearly marked UW APL and Electric Drive Research Vessel or some other indication of alternative energy to encourage outreach. A student run competition to design the graphics will further drive interest in the project. Photos of these boats will be included in project write ups and publications which may get broad distribution. These boats will be seen often while operating around the Seattle waterfront and Lake Washington and in reports and news stories when operating remotely.

UW APL will work with the Seattle Yacht Club to register the boat for the opening day Regatta, bring it to Curiosity Days: Climate Change (Formerly Polar Science Weekend) at the Pacific Science Center, and use it to develop a new pilot program for elementary students focused on sustainable research in and about our local waterways.

CSF funds will be used to purchase the propulsion system from PureWaterCraft along with a hydraulic steering and control system which will support Remote or Autonomous operation. UW APL will supply a hull for the project. UW APL will also fund the student time for the project and individual engineers will donate the mentoring time for the installation and system test.

Once the installation is complete, this project will allow UW APL Engineers and student interns the opportunity to evaluate an emerging technology for use in some of the most fragile marine environments in the world. APL frequently undertakes projects in the Arctic and other areas where they encourage or require researchers to “leave no trace”.

The UW APL is a leader in AUV development and use which requires many launch and recovery operations from small boats. Researchers Craig McNeil and Sarah Webster, along with APL Field Engineers and student helpers operate vehicles that navigate underwater using acoustics that are sensitive to noise in the water. The virtually silent propulsion system from PureWaterCraft will be ideal for tracking and recovering AUVs while the absence of exhaust makes life better for the students and Field Engineers in the boat at slow idle or station keeping waiting for a vehicle to surface.

The UW APL works with researchers, scientists and engineers all over the world and needs stay current to be able to continue to lead by example.

Student Involvement:

Students will lead the design and installation with oversight and mentoring from UW APL engineers.These boats will be used primarily by students and Field Engineers to deploy and recover AUVs and various other marine equipment or to support a larger vessel. 

The vessel will be instrumental in helping with capstone design projects for both UW Bothell and Seattle campuses. APL routinely hosts student Capstone Teams and this vessel will provide a unique framework for designing the future of clean, sustainable research and engineering. A design competition for the boat’s graphics will be created with submissions coming from local high schools and universities. The competition will promote sustainability and the winners will get to ride in the opening day float boat parade along with the students leading the design and installation of the system. 

UW APL has 32 undergraduates and 24 graduate student researchers working at present. This vessel will provide an excellent testbed to support their research and will allow them to better protect the environments they study.

Education & Outreach:

UW APL is a unique position to be a technology evaluator and innovator in the regional commercial fishing industries as well as the international Oceanographic and Marine Science communities. UW APL has a long history of being actively involved in community outreach,this is the 14 th year that the UW APL has worked with the Pacific Science Center to put on Curiosity Days: Climate Change (Formerly Polar Science Weekend). Through the Collaboratory, UW APL hosts Marine Technology startups which allows us to support them and at the same time share best practices which then spread through the industry. APL and the Collaboratory are heavily involved in OCEANS Seattle 2019, the bi-annual event for global marine technologists, engineers, students, government officials, lawyers, and advocates. Events like these help us shape the future of marine technology. 

Once the vessel is complete, a talk will be given on the Current State of Electric Surface Vehicles and the lessons learned from design through construction. This talk will be presented by the student leads and open to all UW students, faculty, and staff. 

Outreach will initially consist of 2 primary efforts. One focus will be an effort to broadcast the work the University of Washington (UW) and the Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington (APL-UW) is doing in the area of marine renewable energy and low carbon footprint marine propulsion. This will be accomplished by conducting a student logo and labeling design contest to visually brand the electric boat providing awareness to anyone that sees the boat during transportation to and from boat launch sites as well as while on the water. The resulting boat configuration will include branding on the boat hull and structure highlighting the use of an all-electric propulsion system installed by UW engineering students. The logo and labeling design will be developed by conducting a logo and labeling design contest with participation from UW students. The winning designs will be selected by the student run Electric Drive Research Vessel team with an emphasis placed on equity and a locally inspired design. Once the boat is branded, the electric boat team will work with the Seattle Yacht Club to register the team and the electric boat for participation in the annual Opening Day Regatta sponsored by the Seattle Yacht Club. UW APL will also bring the vessel to Curiosity Days: Climate Change (Formerly Polar Science Weekend) at the Pacific Science Center, a three-day event full of hands- on activities, live demonstrations, and exciting exhibits.

The second focus will revolve around a pilot program intended to involve elementary school students designing and conducting research using the electric drive boat. Following the pilot program, the electric boat team and the participating teacher will evaluate the effectiveness of the program and determine how the program is conducted in following years. The initial year of the pilot program will consist of a single class from Woodside Elementary School located in MillCreek, Washington. This school was selected because of successful outreach efforts with Ms.Goodwin, one of the 5 th /6 th grade teachers at Woodside, in previous years. Initially Ms. Goodwin reached out APL-UW seeking involvement in her classroom resulting in her classroom participating in programs such as “Classroom at Sea”. “Classroom as Sea” was a program intended to bring classrooms and field researchers together, in this case research efforts at sea. Classrooms where invited to participate in the research cruise via video chat at which time they would ask researchers questions about their work. Ms. Goodwin used this effort to develop curriculum which not only involved the Classroom at Sea but also involved APL-UW staff coming to her classroom to assist in student projects related to the Classroom at Sea experience.This resulted in yearlong curriculum allowing her class to combine science, research methods, writing, teamwork and presentation skills. The outreach program planned for the electric boat will consist of a classroom researching science that could be conducted in local waters (lakes, rivers, estuaries, etc). They in turn will develop research involving observation and data collection that can be conducted in our local water ways throughout the school year utilizing the electric boat.

Once the desired research has been agreed upon, the students will determine what field work is required, then once per month a small team of students from that class will use the electric boat to go into the field to collect data and conduct field experiments. Upon returning to class, the entire class will then utilize the collected data to fulfill curriculum requirements. The curriculum will be developed and monitored with the student run electric boat team and the elementary school teacher to ensure the curriculum outcome is in alignment with the electric boat capabilities, student capabilities and the overall educational goals for the elementary class.

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

The project consists of 4 primary tasks, with the last being the sea trials of the operational boat. The scope of work entails:
Task 1 – Motor Mount
The mounting of the motor should be relatively simple since the electric motor system being acquired is meant to be installed on smaller boats with a transom capable of 50 hp or greater. However to ensure the
electric propulsion system can be easily swapped between multiple hulls, the team will consider design and analysis to accommodate a highly mobile system. This effort will include:
1. Design and Analysis which includes brackets, considerations for controls connectivity and verification of the selected hull transom capabilities.
2. Fabrication of required hardware
3. Mounting the electric motor using the designed and fabricated hardware and testing the functionality of the mounted system.

Task 2 – Controls
The ultimate boat of the electric boat project is to end up with a fully autonomous boat. This phase of the project will consider that end goal and will design the controls system to ultimately be compatible with autonomous system components and control logic. This will require:
1. Design the system architecture for a fully autonomous boat and then design of the control elements capable of accommodating those elements in later phases of the electric boat project.
2. Installation of the components designed in task 2.1
3. Testing of the installed control elements.

Task 3 – Batteries
The electric drive system comes with a self-contained battery system but the team will need to consider a design to allow for easy installation and removal with the goal of a system that can be easily swapped from boat to boat. This will entail:
1. Battery Mount design considering the range of boats the system is to be installed into.
2. Installation of the battery pack in the selected hull
3. Testing of the installation to ensure the battery pack is secure and can easily be installed and removed.
Task 4 – Sea Trials (system testing and validation)
Once the system is installed the team will design a series of tests to be performed to validate the project success. Upon complete of the sea trial test plan, the team will conduct the sea trials to validate the
design and system functionality. The final task is registering for and participating in in the 2020 Opening Day Floating Parade.

Project Timeline
Receive Decision June 1
Receive Funding June 15
Select and Prepare hull(s) August 1
Motor Mount Design and Installation September
Receive Motor and battery pack(s) September 15
Control System Design and Installation October
Battery Mounting Design and Installation November
System Test/Demo December
Opening Day Parade May 2020

Environmental Problem:

As a leader in Arctic research, UW APL operates small boats in the most fragile environments in the world, locally we have small craft operating in Lake Washington frequently and moored in the lake every day. The gas powered motors on our boats are properly maintained, however they still emit exhaust which is run underwater before rising to the surface leaving pollutants in the water and in the air. Typical outboard motors emit 10x-150x the cancer-causing emissions of a modern car due to the lack of requirements for catalytic converters. This pollutes the water and is detrimental to researching and understanding fragile marine ecosystems.

On average, switching all the gas outboards in this boat’s power class (10-50HP) to electric propulsion would result in a ~67% reduction in CO2 across the country, and even more in
Washington State. Some of the sensors we design or purchase can be contaminated by oil and exhaust residue rendering them inaccurate or inoperable. Long before the UW Climate Action
Plan was created, UW APL lived in a word of “leave no trace”. Please help us show the UW brand in the best way.

Looking to manufacturing impacts on sustainability, The Pure Outboard motor is designed to last 20,000 hours and the battery pack 7,000 hours which reduces the emissions of motor/battery
system compared to traditional gasoline outboard motor (4,000 hours) by more than half. 

While conducting research in the Puget Sound, the vessel will be charged at the Applied Physics Laboratory docks with power supplied by the UW Seattle campus. This electricity comes from 94.4% renewable energy sources a majority of which are hydro-electric.

For remote deployments, renewable energy sources will be used to charge the vessel whenever possible. Andy Stewart and his team have developed a Wave Energy Buoy that Self-deploys (WEBS) that can be used to charge the vessel in fragile marine environments with minimal impact on local wildlife. The WEBS System could be easily deployed off the edge of a mothership if in the artic and could recharge the vessel while it is not in operation. There are a number of other cutting edge renewable energy technologies that are being developed at UW APL which could provide power in the future. This vessel will serve as an excellent test load to measure new technologies that are currently under development.

When deploying from an Ice Breaker or similar large research vessel it may be most efficient to charge from the large vessel. No fuel tanks will have to be transferred between vessels or re-filled while in the water. The PureWaterCraft battery pack is designed to heat before charging in extreme environments to prevent damage to the pack.

 

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Pure Outboard Motor6000
Pure Battery Pack8500
Pure Charger2000
SeaStar Pro Steering1600
Reactor 40 Hydraulic Autopilot1750
Optional 2 nd Battery Pack8500

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total: $28,350

Timeline:

Receive DecisionJune 1
Receive FundingJune15
Select and Prepare hull(s)August 1
Motor Mount Design and InstallationSeptember
Receive Motor and battery pack(s)September 15
Control System Design and InstallationOctober
Battery Mounting Design and InstallationNovember
System Test/DemoDecember
System Test/DemoMay 2020

3D Bin Displays

Executive Summary:

EcoReps is requesting $2,412 to install new 3D bins – displays with physical items instructing people how to sort their trash, recycling, and compost – in the Husky Union Building (HUB)’s food court, the Husky Den. These 3D bins should help UW divert waste from landfills, educate and engage the student body about the waste disposal process and it’s impacts, and ease the burden of maintaining the previous bin displays.  

The Husky Den has ten three-bin (compost, recycling, and trash/landfill) waste disposal stations, each of which has had 3D bin displays for the past few years. The 3D displays have been far more effective than any other form of signage currently used by the UW. A recent study by students in ENVIR 250 found that UW’s 3D displays (referred to in the study as “signs with physical items”) had the highest rate of sorting accuracy of the signage studied. Waste was disposed with 81% accuracy at bins with 3D displays, compared to just 61% accuracy for posters and 68% for videos (Chiado et al.). These bins have been the UW’s most effective education tools despite their DIY construction and informal maintenance crew.  Created by UW staff and students on their own time by sawing plastic bins in half, hot-gluing relevant compost, recycling, and trash materials onto the half-bin, and covering the open front with sheets of polylactic acid, the bins need frequent maintenance. For many years, the bins had to be maintained by a single member of the UW Sustainability Office, who cleaned and repaired the bins once a month without pay. The situation is exacerbated by the fact that the bins’ open-top design has occasionally led students to use the displays as basketball hoops for food items and condiment packages. EcoReps has since taken over the cleaning of the bins, but maintaining the bins continues to require more work than is ideal. 

Over winter break of the 2018-2019 school year, HUB custodians took bins down for cleaning and they were thrown away by accident. Because HUB management and Housing and Food Services will not replace the bins, EcoReps would like to take this opportunity to 1) improve the displays by creating more effective and more easily maintained signage and 2) engage the broader UW community in a conversation about the waste disposal process. 

Student Involvement:

Students have been deeply involved in this project since its inception. During winter quarter 2019, five students led this project: EcoReps officers Julie Tolmie and Christina Cameron, and EcoReps members Justin Brave, Marycela Guzman, and Tanya Cortes. Because EcoReps is an RSO made up of both regular members and service learners, we anticipate that a few new students will join the 3D Bin project every quarter, allowing a large number of students to be involved with this project's development and implementation. Officers Julie Tolmie and Christina Cameron provide stability, keep the project moving forward from quarter to quarter, help connect the other student team members with resources and departments on campus, and maintain communication with UW Recycling and the Sustainability Office. UW Recycling's Student Assistent, Nawon Kim, has also been very involved in the design of the new 3D bin signage.  

Education & Outreach:

The Husky Dens’ waste disposal signage is important to replace because UW draws students, staff, and faculty from across Washington, as well as many from out of state and out of the country. Many may not be familiar with how to dispose of compost in particular. Food waste is not the only area where students, staff, and faculty may be confused. While UW dining locations switched to compostable serviceware at all dining locations in 2016, many still do not fully understand how much of their serviceware is compostable. UW does not formally educate students, staff, or faculty how to dispose of waste properly. As a result, signage at bin stations is the primary form of waste education at UW. Improving bin signage is the easiest way to both improve waste education on campus and ensure that UW's compost system and switch to compostable serviceware have a real impact.

While most UW bin stations have 2D signage, putting 3D signage in the HUB is important because 3D signage is the most effective type of signage availabe by a large degree. A study by students in ENVIR 250 found that UW’s 3D displays (referred to in the study as “signs with physical items”) had the highest rate of sorting accuracy of the signage studied. Waste was disposed with 81% accuracy at bins with 3D displays, compared to just 61% accuracy for posters and 68% for videos (Chiado et al.). Replacing the interim 2D posters currently in the Husky Den food court with 3D signage could reduce the amount of waste incorrectly thrown in the trash by as much as 20%. 

In addition to educating the campus about proper waste disposal, our project will serve as a way to increase awareness of and engagement with the waste disposal process. Over the course of winter quarter, EcoReps and UW Recycling worked together to fine-tune the design of the new 3D bins. After looking at products from over 10 venders, we settled on a cleaner, more modern design that is both more attractive and easier to clean than the previous bins were. It is important the bin redesign will make the HUB’s signage more visually appealing because the change will help these already effective bins engage additional HUB users who might otherwise have dirtied or ignored the bin signage.  

Each 3D display will also engage passersby by including facts about the waste cycle – including what happens to trash, recycling, and compost after it’s thrown into a bin, as well as how landfills impact communities and the environment. To extend the reach of these displays beyond the actual stations and reach out to the larger campus, we will work on posters to draw in attention to the new bin displays. The posters will tell the story of how we designed the 3D displays and educate students, staff, and faculty about how the UW’s waste is processed.  

More broadly, this project will show the university’s support for a culture of environmental sustainability on campus. For many, compost, recycling, and trash stations are the most visible sign of UW’s commitment to environmental sustainability.  

Environmental Impact:
  • Food
  • Waste
  • Environmental Justice
Project Longevity:

Once installed, the 3D signage will continue to serve as a reference and educational tool for the UW community. To ensure that the 3D signage remains clean and up-to-date, EcoReps members and officers will check up on the bins monthly to determine whether or not cleaning is required. EcoReps will also work with UW Recycling and HFS to ensure that any future changes to HFS food packaging and serviceware are communicated to EcoReps and UW Recycling so that the 3D displays' contents can be updated. As an RSO that has operated at the UW's Seattle campus for a number of years and successfully implemented environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable projects, we are confident that EcoReps will be able to continue maintaining the signage.

Environmental Problem:

This project will reduce the amount of trash UW sends to landfills by diverting waste. Trash, of which the UW produces a huge amount each day, is problematic from both an ecological and environmental justice standpoint. Transporting waste long distances to landfills, as the city of Seattle does, produces air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Landfills themselves, which can produce air pollution and runoff that contaminates groundwater streams, also tend to be located near low-income communities and communities of color.  

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

This project should reduce the amount of trash UW sends to landfills by improving sorting, and increase student, staff, and faculty's understanding of how to sort their waste. It should indirectly reduce carbon emissions produced in transporting UW's trash to the Oregon landfill where Seattle's trash goes. The EcoReps students who help with this project will also gain experience developing and implementing a project and working collaboratively with multiple UW stakeholders to see the project through to completion.

Total amount requested from the CSF: $2,412
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Project budget, including tax and 10% buffer
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
Display case $73.58 ($50.59 for case, $22.99 for shipping) 30 $2,207.40
Ring table holder (36 piece set) $18.27 ($14.28-Holder $3.99 shipping) 4 sets$73.08
Package of Colored Paper for Backdrop $6.59 1$6.59
3-Bin Display materials $15.00 10$150.00
Double-sided clear mounting tape (60”) $9.16 12$109.92
Informational postersVaries by size25$100.00
Initial Total $2,646.99
Total, including 10% buffer$2,911.69

Non-CSF Sources:

Non-CSF Funding Contribution
SourceAmountContingent on CSF Funding?
UW Recycling$500.00Yes
Project Completion Total: $2,912

Timeline:

Project Timeline
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Request and receive updated list of compostable, recyclable, and landfill materials used in dining halls and food service areas1 month07/19/2019
Order and Receive all other materials5 weeks07/26/2019
Concurrently: Develop in-display and poster messaging3 weeks07/26/2019
Create and Print posters2 weeks08/09/2019
Concurrently: Assemble displays2 weeks08/09/2019
Install in HUB in time for Fall Quarter1 week09/16/2019
Concurrently: Put up informational posters in time for Fall Quarter1 week09/16/2019

Eat Local Seattle Food Fair

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

TEDxUofW

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Keraton 2019

Executive Summary:

Keraton is one of the largest Indonesian cultural events in the West Coast, and the second largest in the United States. This year's theme is Indonesian Festival, which will walk visitors through a recollection of indonesian childhood memories by showcasing attire, foods, activities and movies through the use of imaginative decorations and design. Keraton has grown much since its inception in 2011, before it has a total of 70 attendees and this year, we are estimating an attendance of 8000 multinational visistors from all over the country. Keraton will be held at Rainier Vista, at the University of Washington and has a proposed budget totalling to $35,960.  During this event, we will also be implementing “Keraton Going Green,” which means requiring all our vendors to use compostable food packaging, as well as informing visitors of the locations of recycling and compost bins within the event location to promote environmental awareness. 

Student Involvement:

With the event being fully organized and managed by students, ISAUW develops students’ leadership and organizational skills by trusting each department with tasks that are critical to the event’s success. Specifically, the finance, design, creative management, IT, inventory, event organisers deparments work together and update each other to make this event a success, checking on each other's progress for example. In addition, we accept volunteers and further create opportunities for students all-over the campus. Overall, students will be able to utilize and develop their communication skills by engaging with guests, learning about Indonesian culture, environmental issues, and gain meaningful connections.

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
  • Food
  • Waste
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

we made it our mission to require all vendors to use compostable food packaging. In addition, we informed all of our visitors of the locations of recycling and compost bins within the event location. This year, aside from implementing our previous methods, we plan to promote environmental awareness through a performance during the event. Our creative management department has been working towards this and we have also sent out an application for performers who would be interested in educating guests on environmental issues. We are optimistic that these performances, guests will be better informed on the current situation of our environment while also being entertained.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Creating a Sustainable Night Market

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Vocal Theater Works Principal Production: Hydrogen Jukebox

Executive Summary:

During the spring term of 2019, the students of Vocal Theater Works will present the musical theatre piece Hydrogen Jukebox by Allen Ginsberg and Phillip Glass. The Hydrogen Jukeboxproject is an educational outreach performance that addresses ways in which our collective American culture and actions have shaped the modern world, resulting in ongoing issues of cultural suppression, war, and environmental degradation. A regional premier, this production allows Vocal Theater Works to examine central themes of this iconic work and their relevance to our local and university community.  After each performance, a panel comprised of performers and authorities from both the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest community will engage the audience in conversation about the work and its primary themes. The students of Vocal Theater Works ask for a $6,000 grant from the Campus Sustainability Fund to help us complete this project. The Hydrogen Jukeboxproduction and post-performance discussion sessions will be held in Meany Studio Theater on the University of Washington Campus. This production represents collaboration between multiple ensembles within the School of Music, while also engaging input from across the University in the areas of anthropology, public health, and comparative literature.

 

For more information on this project, faculty and artistic directors involved please visit: https://music.washington.edu/events/2019-04-26/vocal-theatre-workshop-ph....

Student Involvement:

Role Creation:

Vocal Theater Works’ production of Hydrogen Jukeboxprovides various opportunities for student involvement. Eleven students will perform all principle sung roles in our double-cast production of Hydrogen Jukebox.The production also features spoken poetry and correspondence performed by a student narrator throughout the production. In their role preparation, students of Vocal Theater Works will apply their skills in acting, singing, movement, and musicianship, bringing life to individual and ensemble performances in this technically demanding work of Music Theatre. Each singing actor has the responsibility to establish the narrative world in which the sung poetry occurs, and to articulate Ginsberg’s call for cultural sustainability, peace, and environmental stewardship. 

 

Narrator:                     Trevor Ainge

Soprano 1:                 Sarah Fantappiè, Lauren Kulesa

Soprano 2:                  Erika Meyer, Tasha Hayward

Mezzo:                        Vivianna Oh, Inna Tsygankova

Tenor:                         Will Schlott, John O'Kane

Baritone 1:                  DJ Jordan, Christopher Benfield

Baritone 2/Bass:         Jacob Caspe

Instrumental Ensemble: The instrumental ensemble of 10 players consists of both students and School of Music Faculty.

 

Student Development Coordinator:

            Trevor Ainge serves as the 2018-2019 student development coordinator for Vocal Theater Works at the University of Washington. He serves in a leadership capacity in fundraising and outreach for this project.

 

Discussion Panelists:

            The post-performance discussion panels will consist of the ensemble cast of Hydrogen Jukebox. Cast members will share their experiences in creating the performance and speak to the work’s promotion of themes of peace, cultural sustainability, and environmental stewardship. The panel will also consist of authorities from the wider Pacific Northwest community, including Tom Carpenter, executive director of Hanford Challenge, and Liz Mattson, deputy director of Hanford Challenge. We will seek additional input from the departments of anthropology, public health and comparative literature at the University of Washington as well as local LGBT advocacy groups.

 

Community Stakeholders:

            In addition to the singing actors, narrator, and instrumentalists creating the production, the performance process includes stakeholders from the student population at the University as well as the broader community in the all-important role of audience members engaged in critical thinking and dialogue in the context of the shared experience of these performances.

 

 

Education & Outreach:

The Hydrogen Jukebox performances are by nature an educational outreach project. In their collaboration on this work, Glass and Ginsberg strove to form a portrait of America and assess the fruits of our collective identity. They felt that pressing social and environmental issues, with implications for both Americans and our global community, were not being addressed by contemporary politicians and media outlets. They created Hydrogen Jukebox to call attention to and assess our collective role in occasions of war, environmental devastation, cultural oppression, and the moral, health and environmental crisis occasioned by the proliferation of nuclear technology. Our presentation of this work provides the unique historical perspective of American views on the social and environmental problems that defined the latter half of the twentieth century. While the work stands as a valuable historical document, its relevance is maintained because American society still grapples with many of the same issues today. 

A predominant theme throughout Hydrogen Jukebox is the development and prevalent dependency on nuclear technology during the twentieth century. Nuclear technology in the United States was first developed as a weapon of war, and subsequently harnessed as a source of renewable energy. During the twenty-first century, the international community continues to struggle with issues surrounding the development of nuclear weapons and the use of nuclear energy. In 2011 the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan disturbed surrounding communities and ecologies and posed a complex global engineering problem. We have potent examples of Ginsberg’s themes here in Washington state. Our state is home to an increasingly complicated nuclear containment dilemma at the decommissioned Hanford nuclear production site. This very site is the birthplace of our colored relationship with nuclear technology, having provided the plutonium used in the bombing of Nagasaki. After the second World War, the Hanford Site continued its production of plutonium for nuclear weapons and civilian power until 1987. Many workers involved in the development and ongoing containment of spent nuclear material have suffered due to exposure to radiation. Inadequate containment of nuclear waste at Hanford continues to pose an ongoing threat to the environment and communities along the Columbia river. A startling comparison may be drawn between Ginsberg’s imagery of a landscape marred by nuclear fallout and the tangible environmental and personal effects of living and working along a nuclear site in Eastern Washington and along the Columbia river.

Beyond documenting the largest environmental concerns of the past century, the work treats themes of the twentieth century Gay liberation movement and the lived experiences of LGBT individuals. Allen Ginsberg, author of the Hydrogen Jukebox libretto, lived and worked as a prominent gay artist in a society that criminalized his sexual identity, and his experiences are highlighted throughout the work. While strides toward equality for this community have been made since the turn of the twenty-first century, we are still working towards equal rights for LGBT individuals across the nation. Only twenty-two states have outlawed discrimination against individuals based on sexual identity and gender identity. This leaves the LGBT community with unequal protection against discrimination in housing and employment across regions of the United States. Our production of Hydrogen Jukebox will engage the LGBT community and wider campus population in evaluation of the local impact of themes and issues relating to social justice and sustainability. This Production will also serve to further the historical preservation of this important work, insuring its ongoing potential to provoke thought, discussion, and change.

The Vocal Performance department of the School of Music has a robust publicity program in place for its productions. An event and information webpage created by the School of Music marketing department has been included in this proposal. The marketing department and students of Vocal Theater Works have also created social media profiles, events, and promotional materials for this production. In addition to our internet presence, promotional posters advertising Hydrogen Jukeboxwill be created and distributed throughout campus and the wider community at the beginning of the Spring 2019 term. Invitations to departments whose fields of study are related to this work will also be sent out in the months prior to the two performance dates. If funding allows, there are also plans for local radio and print media advertisements.

Environmental Impact:
  • Living Systems and Biodiversity
  • Environmental Justice
  • Community Development
  • Cultural Representation
  • Social Justice
Project Longevity:

This project does not require any long-term management or maintenance. Preparation for this project began January 7, 2019 and will culminate in two performances on April 26th and 27th, 2019.

Environmental Problem:

The primary sustainability challenge that we are addressing is a need for historical knowledge of how twentieth century American actions and culture continue to impact our contemporary world. Vocal Theater Works’ Hydrogen Jukeboxproduction and post-production discussions will engage the community with a portrait of American culture and demonstrate how our collective actions have resulted in war, environmental degradation, and cultural suppression. We hope that audience members will evaluate their own role as citizens and work collectively to learn from past mistakes in order to create a more just and environmentally sustainable future. 

 

Our secondary sustainability challenge will be to mitigate the environmental impact of production materials through the use of rented, borrowed and recycled goods. We will use a projector and visual media to minimize the use of physical set materials. When we must use physical goods such as props and costumes, we will use recycled materials. When acquiring goods, we will ensure that they can be reused or repurposed in future productions.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Sustainability impacts will be measured by attendance to the performance, and through participation in performance talk backs. We will hold two performances of Hydrogen Jukeboxin Meany Studio Theater, a performance space seating 250 guests. Our goals will be evaluated by the percentage of possible attendees who engage with the work.  We will also provide a physical opportunity for audience members to provide feedback as to contemporary issues and themes relevant to the work and the issues raised by the production. 

 

We will also quantify the physical goods acquired for this project. We will evaluate our success by the proportion of goods acquired that can be recycled and repurposed in future productions.

Total amount requested from the CSF: $6,000
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Budget: CSF Funding Request
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
Projection Design1,00011,000
Stage Sets5001500
Costumes5001500
Choreography1,00011,000
Post-Event Disussion Panel and Recognition Ceremony2002400
Body Mics40031,200
Lighting1,00011,000
Commercial Media Publicity and Outreach4001400

Non-CSF Sources:

Budget: Non-CSF Funding Sources
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal CostFunding Source
Music Direction10,000110,000Friends of Opera Fund and Cisco Matching
Stage Direction and Project Management10,000110,000Friends of Opera Fund and School of Music Budget
Professional Orchestra Player7501750Friends of Opera Fund
Projector Rental2,00012,000Friends of Opera Fund
Music Rental Fee6501650Friends of Opera Fund
Music Rental Liscencing4001400Friends of Opera Fund
Vocal Score Rental1512180Friends of Opera Fund
Project Completion Total: $29,980

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Production Meeting #11 dayDecember 10, 2019
Production Meeting #21 dayJanuary 14, 2019
Musical Rehearsal4 weeksFebruary 3, 2019
Staging and Choreography11 WeeksApril 19, 2019
Orchestral Rehearsals13 WeeksApril 22, 2019
Sound System Confirmation13 WeeksApril 22, 2019
Michrophone Purchase1 monthMarch 6, 2019
Costume Sizing for Cast1 dayMarch 4, 2019
Costuming and Props7 WeeksApril 16, 2019
Set Design Confirmation7 WeeksApril 16, 2019
Lighting Design14 WeeksApril 15, 2019
Projector Rental Confirmation7 WeeksMarch 6, 2019
Projection Design15 weeksApril 22, 2019
Discussion Panel: membership confirmation5 weeksFebruary 25, 2019
Discussion Panel: preliminary meeting1 dayMarch 14, 2019
Promotional Materials: generation10 weeksMarch 18, 2019
Promotional Materials: distributionongoingMarch 18 - April 27, 2019
Lighting Meeting1 dayMarch 4, 2019
Program Materials: compilation1 dayApril 1, 2019
Program Printing1 dayApril 22, 2019
Frinal Room Run #11 dayApril 17, 2019
Orchestra Sitzprobe1 dayApril 18, 2019
Final Room Run #21 dayApril 19, 2019
Projector Delivery and Instalation1 dayApril 20,2019
Meany Studio Theater Load-in1 dayApril 22, 2019
Piano Tech Rehearsal1 dayApril 22, 2019
Production Tech/Lighting5 daysAprill 25, 2019
Orchestra Dress Rehearsals2 daysApril 25, 2019
Performance #1, Discussion Panel1 dayApril 26, 2019
Performance #2, Discussion Panel1 dayApril 27, 2019
Set Strike1 dayApril 27, 2019
Load Out1 dayApril 28, 2019

Africa Now 2019 Conference

Executive Summary:

 

 

It is no secret that for over 500 years, the wealthy continent of Africa has been and continues to be exploited - both for its resources and its peoples. However, with the boom of communication and information technology in recent years, African voices have begun to spread around the globe, and we have learned that despite the revolutionary conflicts of the mid-20th century, African nation states remain under the influence of imperial powers. These previously-colonized countries are subject to the whim of the neocolonial and neoliberal policies imposed by international, financial institutions like the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. Furthermore, by listening closely the affected, we discover that the ongoing development projects are utterly unsustainable and do not serve to truly benefit Africans.

In recognizing that current development projects are draining Africa of its natural resources, destroying its ecosystems, and exploiting its peoples, Africa Now is seeking ~$13,000 to assist in organizing our second annual conference to inspire young Black students and professionals to join the movement for sustainable, afrocentric, African development. By tapping into the network of young, Black students and professionals in Washington, we can bring together an interdisciplinary group of driven individuals to evaluate how our skills can play a role in the sustainable growth of our common, ancestral homeland.

The Africa NOW Conference -- hosted and organized in collaboration with the African Student Association, Black Student Union, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, and other student organizations -- will bring together over 200, young, Black students and professionals. At the conference, we will provide them with the insights, knowledge, and resources necessary to envision sustainable ways to improve their communities in Seattle, in Africa, and across the Diaspora. Through an all-star panel, dynamic breakout sessions, and networking, we’ll inspire and equip young Black professionals to fight for a sustainable future for Africa.

The conference will be held in the Ethnic Cultural Center from 10am - 5pm. Lunch and refreshments will be provided throughout the day.

Student Involvement:

 

 

The first annual Africa Now conference was successful in gathering over 100, mostly Black or African, UW students to discuss and explore resources and tactics for sustainable, afrocentric development in their communities in Seattle, Africa, or the larger African Diaspora. For this year’s conference, we hope to repeat the strategies that helped us to cultivate student interest and involvement last year, while learning from the approaches that lacked the desired impact. Our goal is to involve as many interested and open-minded students as possible, as long as they are motivated to fight for sustainable development projects that center Africans and other oppressed groups.

The most important strategy for ensuring UW students are interested in attending the conference is for it to be organized by students. As students, the organizing board is aware of the general interests and concerns that our peers share; this allows us to target speakers, facilitators, and resources that can best address those needs. Given the success of last years event, dozens of students were interested in getting involved in the conference again. The level of interest required the Program Directors to institute an application process to select this year’s organizing board.

However, those students that weren’t selected to be a part of the organizing board, will still be able to contribute to making this project a reality if they so choose. We will reach out to the previous applicants as well as other students to help volunteer at the event on the day of. We will need volunteers to help set up the spaces, check-in attendees, and distribute conference resources - among other tasks. Beyond seeking volunteers from prior applicants, we will reach out to our collaborators (e.g. the Black Student Union, African Student Association, African Youth Coalition, etc.) to recruit volunteers.

Beyond serving as organizers or volunteers, the best way for students to get involved in the Africa Now Project is by attending the conference itself. The conference will be a great opportunity for students to learn about afrocentric, sustainable development projects and how to be involved in making that a reality. Despite the afrocentric nature of this event, the strategies and tactics of the conference can be applied to communities and countries that do not belong to the African diaspora. As such, Africa Now will seek to reach out to FIUTS, FASA, MEChA and other student organizations that serve students and communities of color. These groups could not only explore strategies for sustainable development, but they could also learn how to be better allies for Black/African people.

Education & Outreach:

 

 

The UW and Seattle-area African student population will learn about Africa Now through a variety of channels. At the current moment, awareness of Africa Now has mainly been spread via social media and word of mouth; additionally, the organizing board is actively collaborating with other Black and African student organizations on campus to ensure their student bodies are aware of the event; we are also planning to host at least 2 lead up events to promote awareness.

Our first collaboration was the Black student “Friendsgiving” event during the middle of Fall Quarter. Breaking bread with other students on campus was our first opportunity to spread the word about Africa Now and our future lead-up events. The first lead-up event we are planning will take place on January 17th at the African Student Association (ASA) meeting. The event, organized in collaboration with the ASA, Africa Now, and African Youth Coalition, will focus on identifying the challenges of working in/with African communities. The discussion will give the UW community its first taste of Africa Now in 2019.

Following the first lead-up discussion, Africa Now will be involved in the annual Black Diaspora meeting organized in Black History Month by the Black Student Union. As co-hosts, we will help lead the discussion around what it means to be a part of the African Diaspora; in particular, we want the students to consider how they can play a role in making sustainable, afrocentric development projects a reality - both in communities on the Continent and our local communities in/around Seattle. We also plan to organize a second lead-up event independent that will take place on the Seattle Central College campus in an effort to expand Africa Now beyond the UW community.

These discussions will allow the UW students in attendance to get directly involved in shaping Africa Now. At the discussions, we will have surveys available to gauge interest in the lead-up events as well as to learn what students hope to gain from the Africa Now conference. This will allow us to ensure our speakers/events are tailored appropriately to our audience. Furthermore, they will help to eliminate any blind spots our organizing board might have.

Other than attending the lead-up events and filling out pre-conference surveys, the best way for UW students to get involved with the project will be by attending the conference itself. The Africa Now Conference is being organized with Black/African UW students in mind. While we will not restrict access to this conference, the conference theme and topic will be entirely afrocentric. We intend to reach out to students from other underrepresented and marginalized groups; because, Africa Now and the African Youth Coalition, along with many other Black/African organizations, believe that Black Liberation will inevitably lead to the liberation of all other oppressed groups. By exploring afrocentric, sustainable strategies for development in Black/African communities, other oppressed/minority groups can learn tactics for opposing the status quo and centering their peoples’ voices in projects that take place in and outside of their communities.

At the end of the conference, attendees will be required to fill out a post-conference survey in order to receive their complimentary, conference t-shirts. By requiring surveys to be filled out, we’ll be receiving as much feedback as possible, and we can use these results - in comparison with pre-conference surveys - to learn methods for enhancing future programming. These results will also be used in grant reporting and general conference evaluation.

Environmental Impact:
  • Environmental Justice
  • Community Development
  • Cultural Representation
  • Social Justice
Project Longevity:

(See previous sections for discussions on the organization of our project team and discussion of project maintainence)

Environmental Problem:

 

The central focus of Africa Now is raising a local awareness about the unsustainability of global development projects, especially those taking place in African countries and communities. We want attendees to recognize the unique position of Africans - on the Continent and throughout the diaspora - to play a role in addressing the problems that arise from those projects. Africa Now sees development as having 4 key areas of impact that determine whether or not a project is sustainable: environmental, economic, political, and social. Each of these aspects is important to ensure that projects are truly sustainable for the people, their country, their land, and the world.  While the political and social areas are typically more locally/regionally isolate, the environmental and economic impacts and pressures can be - and typically are - global in nature.

The traditional focus of sustainability is on the impacts that are arising from global, economic development projects and climate change. The economic impacts of development go far beyond the jobs and wealth that are created by technology innovation and resource exploitation. Economics has to do with the control, consumption, distribution, and exploitation of resources, goods, and services, and, in relation to this, economic sustainability is typically thought of as combating global poverty and wealth inequality by affecting the utilization and distribution of regional resources. In this way, economic sustainability is deeply interconnected with environmental sustainability. Environmental sustainability has to do with preserving local environments and ecosystems, and promoting a global awareness of the issues arising from climate change. Given that extracting and utilizing natural resources contributes to the further degradation of the global climate, any effort to bring about environmental sustainability must be connected to global and local economies.

While economic and environmental efforts are typically concerned with a more global mindset, social and political sustainability projects are focused on local and regional levels. Social and political sustainability are typically concerned with the capabilities, rights, and freedoms afforded to Africans and other peoples. While there are many different facets to social sustainability (cultural practices, land rights, food scarcity, etc), we believe it important to focus on the health-related aspects of society. Given the ongoing health concerns in African nations (e.g. malaria, HIV/AIDS, mental health, lack access to adequate resources, etc.), it is crucial that Africans take major strides towards addressing these issues within their own communities to break from their dependency on aid from foreign governments and NGOs.

Additionally, given the pressures that foreign governments and NGOs place on African nations, there is an urgent need for African nations to gain true independence. Ever since previously-colonized countries - both inside and outside of Africa - gained their independence, the imperial powers have been using loans from the World Bank and International Monetary Fund to impose neoliberal policies on their former colonies. This has resulted in an illusion of independence in the majority of African Nations, which greatly restricts their ability to deal with sustainability issues, including climate change.

Given the fact that previously colonized countries are the most adversely affected by climate change and that Africans populate many of those regions, it would make sense to raise a trans-national awareness about the role that young Africans can play in contributing to sustainability locally and globally. We believe - given the natural humanitarian tendencies of many African cultures and communities - that afrocentric development will naturally lead to sustainability However, this will only occur if young Africans around the globe begin to have honest and difficult conversations about the ongoing, unsustainable projects that are continually affecting our communities.

The holistic, Africa Now conference will explore the four areas of sustainability (economic, environmental, social, and political) through a series of workshops, a panel discussion, and an inclusive resource fair. There will be four conference workshops, one for each area of sustainability, taking place during two breakout sessions; this means that Africa Now attendees will have to make a choice as to which areas of sustainability are most applicable to them, their work, and their lives.

The Africa Now organizing board has already begun to identify and contact potential speakers for the 2019 conference workshops and panel discussion. The following list of speakers are the individuals we have presently identified that could lead workshops in the relevant areas. As you can see, for many of the categories we have identified multiple potential speakers, and we hope to - where possible - pull one of each speaker to serve on our panel discussion such that the panel is as holistic as the conference itself.

Economic:

  • Isaiah Udutong
  • Nourah Yonous
  • Benjamin Fernandes

Social:

  • Christy Abram
  • Sitawa Wafula
  • Claire Gwayi

Political:

  • Francis Abugbilla
  • Belo-Osagie
  • Kehinde Andrews

Environmental:

  • Martin Bagaram
  • Paulo Ivo Garrido

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

 

The 2019 Africa Now organizing board has been working hard towards making the 2nd annual conference a reality since September of 2018. Since the end of September when the full organizing board was assembled, we have been actively working towards establishing what the conference will look like as well as putting together all of the initial details prior to contacting our potential speakers, facilitators, and resource fair individuals. Figure 1 (also included in supplementary documents) includes an extended - but not complete - gantt chart detailing much of the organizing activities that still need to be completed prior to, and following, the conference.

While there is still much to be done prior to the conference being underway, the board believes that the project is more than underway. The remaining details will be worked out by the extraordinary organizing board that was assembled for this year’s conference. The tremendous success of the inaugural conference saw Africa Now really take off in its own right. As such, there was a slight restructuring of the host organization and the way the board is assembled. The inaugural conference was hosted by the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, but we realized that it would be more advantageous if it were hosted by a grassroots community organization. As such, the primary host of the conference is the Seattle African Youth Coalition (AYC).

The AYC is also partnering with on-campus organizations (e.g. Phi Beta Sigma, Black Student Union, African Student Association, etc.) to promote and organize the event. Many of the outstanding members of this years organizing board are affiliated with one of those organizations. Having cross-campus affiliations as well as building coalitions with off-campus organization has allowed Africa Now to broaden its audience and establish deep ties with the Black and African youth around Seattle.

The full project team and organizing board is comprised of the following positions and the people occupying them:

  • Co-Program Director: Kemi Akinlosotu
  • Co-Program Director: Hawi Nemomssa
  • Advancement and Treasure Chair: Tyler Valentine
  • Secretary: Michelle Mvundura
  • Community Engagement: Mariam Tesfaye
  • Marketing Strategist: Deborah Keme
  • Graphic Designer: Ebneazer Tsegaye
  • General Officer: Mihret Haile
  • General Officer: Feven Gurmu
  • Program Advisor: Wole Akinlosotu
Total amount requested from the CSF: $13,200
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

List of organizations we are seeking to partner with
African Chamber of Commerce
Africans at microsoft
Africa Town
Ethiopian Community Center
City of Seattle Race & Social Justice Initiative
One Vibe Africa
She Leads Africa
Front and Centered
Dundu Nation
Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Black Student Union Legacy Soriee

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Gardening with Electric Bikes

Executive Summary:

Grounds Management, the UW farm and the UW Botanic Gardens (UWBG) are looking to reduce our carbon footprint by adding 7 electric bikes to our fleets. Our goals are to decrease our to reduce our reliance on vehicles that burn fossil fuels and show that electric bikes can be used as a alternative for fossil fuel burning vehicles for the majoirty of maitenance tasks accomplished on campus. These bikes would be used on main campus, the UW Farm, the Center for Urban Horticulture and the Arboretum. Each of these organizations works directly with students who would benefit from this program. We will track our gas usage with the goal of reducing the amount of C02 put into the atmosphere by 30,000 pounds.Over time we will review how often these bikes are being used, and the cost savings accrued, with the overall goal of using the money saved to supply each Grounds Management crew a bike (9 total). Switching to an all electric fleet is currently not feasible for the majority of UW departments and this grant will be treated as a feasibility study to show that electric bicycles can be financially and envrionmentally beneficial for UW departments. The overall costs requested from the Campus Sustainability Funds including a 10% contingency is $117,125.

Student Involvement:

Students will be involved throughout all facets of this project. The project is currently facilitated by a graduate student research assistant from the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences with the title Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Sustainability Coordinator. The IPM and Sustainability Coordinator will attend sustainability events and will develop educational and outreach components for the program. The graduate student will be responsible for record keeping, costs and the productivity of the project. The graduate student currently uses a truck at least twice a week. If the grant is accepted this student will rely solely on the electric bicycles. In addition there are many student volunteers that work on campus for a variety of restoration and horticulture related tasks. For example the society for ecological restoration works on multiple campus projects such as the Kinkaid Ravine. Unfortunately, these students are not able to use Facilities fossil fuel vehicles. The IPM and Sustainability coordinator will work with different grounds related student volunteer groups throughout campus and supply them with the Grounds Shop bicycles for their various tasks.

In addition this project will supply student workers and volunteers at the UW farm with a means of transportation. Students will now be able to travel with ease from the farms main site at the CUH to their locations on main campus (Mercer Court and McMahon Hall). The farm currently works with over 400 students that would directly benefit from receiving an electric bicycle. The farm has a new UW Gleaning team run primarily by students who would benefit directly from the E-bike. The team is run jointly by the UW farm and UW pantry. The pantry would be utilizing the E-bike for gleaning across campus dinning.

The E-Bicycle Mail & Package Delivery Program established a partnership with the HUB Graphic Design Office where student employees created the designs for our education outreach material. We will look to expand this partnership to include Grounds Management and UWBG.

UWBG often hosts student interns in the spring and summer quarters. These students are restricted from operating the current fleet of vehicles making transportation difficult. An E-Bike would allow student interns to safely move tools to and from their worksites, and greatly enhance their independence. Hosting student interns is an important part of the mission of UWBG and helps train the next generation of horticulturists. Having an E-Bike would greatly enhance the student intern program.  
 

Education & Outreach:

Climate change is one of the biggest problems facing our planet today. In 2016, transportation contributed up to 28.5 percent of the damage (Epa.gov). As one of the country’s leading institutions, it is the University of Washington’s obligation to lead the charge in the fight against climate change. Grounds maintenance is an area that burns a significant amount of fossil fuels. Finding ways to keep the productivity of grounds management high, while reducing its fossil fuel consumption is currently a high priority. Reducing our reliance on fossil fuels while keeping our productivity high and will show other Universities that going green can be financially advantageous. The University of Washington’s Climate Action Plan sets a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 15% by 2020 and by 36% by 2035.

The goals of this program are to (1) vastly decrease the carbon footprint of UW Grounds Management, the University of Washington Botanic Gardens (UWBG), which includes WPA, Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH) and the UW Farm by reducing our reliance on vehicles that burn fossil fuels and (2) show that Electric Bikes can be used as a viable alternative for fossil-fuel burning vehicles for the majority of maintenance tasks. Many of the jobs completed by Grounds Management and UWBG can be accomplished without the need of high consumption vehicles (such as the trucks and gasoline powered utility vehicles). Switching to an all-electric fleet is currently not feasible for the majority of UW departments and this grant will be treated as a feasibility study to show that electric bicycles can be financially and environmentally beneficial for departments. Data about the economic and environmental benefits of the program will be tracked and shared by the graduate student employed by grounds management. 

Outreach efforts will be conducted by each contributing branch (Grounds Management, UWBG).  Each bicycle, which will be displayed throughout campus, will include numerous stats about the environmental and economic benefits of the program (such as the amount of atmospheric carbon that has been reduced due to each bike). Information will be included about the program on both the Grounds Management and UWBG websites. The UWBG has one of the most extensive outreach programs on the University of Washington campus in that it provides weekly adult education classes. Efforts will also be made to contact UW daily about including an article about this new project. 

Environmental Impact:
  • Transportation
Project Longevity:

Below you will find an estimate of costs associated with this project. Including the bicycles, annual maintenance costs for five years and bicycle supplies. The amount requested from CSF including five years of maitenance and a 10% contingency totals to $117,125.

The bikes for the proposed grant will be purchased through Family Cyclery. This company supplied the bikes for E-Bicycle-Mail & Package Delivery Program. The Grounds staff reviewed bicycles from three companies and thought the ones from Family Cyclery were the safest and most feasible for the jobs accomplished by the UW Farm and UW Grounds staff. The package campus delivery program has been extremely pleased with the company and we hope to continue this successful partnership.

We’ve included 5 years of maintenance on the bicycles after which, each faction on this grant (the UW Grounds Shop, and UWBG) will assume responsibility for their bikes supplies and maintenance (see attached for maitenance details). 

Thank you for considering this proposal!

Environmental Problem:

The University of Washington contains one of the premier campuses in the country. However, staff and students rely heavily on fossil fueled vehicles for transportation of goods and services. Grounds Management, the UW farm and the UW Botanic Gardens (UWBG) at the University of Washington currently contain 26 vehicles that run on gas including various trucks and gators (small utility vehicles). These vehicles are used throughout campus on a variety of jobs aimed to improve the campus’s aesthetics. On average, the vehicles used by Grounds Management, UWBG and the UW Farm burn 8,000 gallons of gas a year which release 160,000 pounds of C02 into the atmosphere.

UW Botanic Gardens (UWBG), which includes the Washington Park Arboretum (WPA) horticulture staff uses 4 vehicles that run on gas, and two utility vehicles that run on biodiesel. WPA has been gaining staff in the past few years, and the fleet of vehicles must grow to accommodate these personnel. UWBG would like to expand the fleet in the greenest and smallest footprint manner possible, and a utility bike would be the perfect fit for the organization.

The UW farm and the Student Pantry rely on fossil fueled vehicles (a truck and UCar) for transporting perishable food from the farm sites and campus dining sites to the Student Pantry every week. Organic produce grown at the UW Farm and food produced at campus dining locations have been donated to the Student Pantry for more than two years. The food items are small quantities from multiple locations which are highly perishable and need to be transported to the Pantry within 24 hours of harvest. Trips occur up to two to three times a week, nearly, year-round. We estimate that this would reduce up to 2 tons of food waste per year.

A shared electric bike with attached cargo bin for the UW farm and the Student Pantry would reduce the need for fossil fuel burning vehicles and make movement more efficient, flexible and agile. Often, produce amounts are small, but are too bulky for hand-carrying. Using an electric bike is a more scale appropriate option.

Providing E-bikes to Grounds Management, the UW Farm, and UWBG will help the University towards these emissions goals.

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Recently, a grant was received by UW Mailing services which provided them with an E-Bicycle-Mail & Package Delivery Program. This grant has been extremely successful and it is a desire of Grounds Management, UWBG and the UW Farm to emulate its success. Although a truck will be required for the occasional job, we are proposing to reduce our reliance on them with the goal of using1500 less gallons of gasoline per year. The reduction of 1500 gallons of gas per year will decrease the amount of C02 put into the atmosphere by 30,000 pounds and will save the University $4,500 dollars per year (at $3 per gallon of gasoline).

We propose to reduce UW’s reliance on gas powered vehicles by supplying 4 electric bicycles to be shared throughout the Grounds Management shop, 1 electric bike for the Center for Urban Horticulture staff, 1 electric bike for the WPA horticulture staff and 1 for the UW farm (7 total). Of these 7 vehicles 5 will be electric with a hatchback, 1 will be an electric with front racks and rear bags (for small jobs) and 1 will be a small fold up electric bike (for attending meetings and other non-laborious tasks). The different bikes were chosen to maximize their usage. We will also require miscellaneous accessory items such as helmets and u locks. Over time we will review how often these bikes are being used, and the cost savings accrued, with the overall goal of using the money saved to supply each Grounds Management crew a bike (9 total) and reducing the amount of gas-powered vehicles that are used per day. The bikes were split up according to the size of the department and each department’s potential need. The UW grounds shop currently has over 40 employees which is more than triple the other partnering departments combined.

Eventually we would like to be one of the first University Grounds Management Operations to run predominately on electric and people powered vehicles.
 

Total amount requested from the CSF: $117,125
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Gardening with Electric Bikes Budget
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost
Initial Costs for Bikes and Trailers:
Urban Arrow Shorty E-Bike w/paint job: https://www.urbanarrow.com/en/shorty7,306.67536,533.33
Vektron folding bicycle w/paint job https://familycyclery.com/bikes/tern-vektron-s-10-g1-folding-electric-bicycle-seattle3,34913,349
Tern GSD Electric Bike: https://www.ternbicycles.com/why-bikesforbusiness 6,568.3416,568.34
Miscellaneous Items:
Helmet* https://www.rei.com/product/128935/smith-portal-mips-bike-helmet110141540
Locks: BORDO Big 6000-Extra long length 3.9’-5mm steel links757525
Storage Shed reconstruction (For Grounds Management) -The shed where the bikes will reside needs significant work to fit the bikes. The high price is due to the reconstruction efforts that would need to occur. We would work with CSF and a student to see if it was feasible to build some sort of green roof onto this structure. This could be seed money for an additional future project.10,000110,000
5 year Maintenance Plan4,984734,888
Carport awning for storage (Arboretum)3,00013,000
Advanced Mechanic Tool Kit-AK3 https://www.parktool.com/product/advanced-mechanic-tool-kit-ak-3?category=Tool%20Kits -Tool kit which will be used for years 6-10 maintenance of the bikes that will be done in house. 305.951305.95
TOTAL
Project Subtotal96,709.62
Tax (10.1%)9,767.67
Project Total106,477.29
Project Total Including 10% Contingency117,125

Non-CSF Sources:

In-Kind Donation
SourceType of FundingDetailsTotal Hours (five years)Estimated Cost
IPM and Sustainability CoordinatorIn-Kind DonationsThe IPM Coordinator through Grounds Management will transport the bikes multiple times per year to Family Cyclery for there maintenance requirements. In addition they will track the environmental and economic success of the program. If successful grounds will look to purchase more E-Bikes and remove some of their trucks. The IPM coordinator will also work with CSF to maximize the outreach efforts of the program.20010,000
Project Completion Total: $127,125

Timeline:

Gardening with Electric Bikes Project Timeline
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Phase 1: Mid-March - Mid-May 2018
Determine Amount of Funding ReceivedMid-May - Early June
Submit an Order for Bikes and Gear Based off of the Level of Funding1 WeekJune 1st, 2019
Include information about the program on the Grounds Management and UWBG Website1 MonthJune 1st, 2019
Contact UW Daily about potentially including an article about this new project. 1 MonthJune 1st, 2019
Plan storage space construction around the Grounds Management Shop (Plant Annex 4) and at the Arboretum. 1 MonthJune 1st, 2019
Phase 2: July - September 2019
Receive Fully Equipped Models2 MonthsJuly 1st, 2019
Bikes are implemented into Grounds Management and UWBG fleets3 monthsAugust 1st, 2019
Follow up with UW Daily about potential publishing of article2 WeeksJuly 15th, 2019
Contact local media about running a story on the program1 monthAugust 1st, 2019
Start construction of storage spaces4 monthsSeptember 1st, 2019
Phase 3: October 2019 - January 2020
Evaluate current bike usage and purchase more bikes if needed.TBDJanuary, 2020
Long-Term
Monitor Program with the help of facility services. Examine the reduction of C02 before and after bikes were implemented into Grounds Management and UWBG fleet. OngoingOngoing
Grounds management and UWBG takes over payments for annual maintenance1 WeekJune 1st, 2024

University of Washington Precious Plastic

Executive Summary:

Inspired by Dave Hakken's project, Precious Plastic, the University of Washington Precious Plastic (UWPP) project plans to build a small-scale plastic recycling workspace on campus in the Maple Hall Makerspace. Housing and Food Services supports Precious Plastic and has accepted the administrative responsibility for this project. The workspace will consist of four machines that shred, melt, compress, and mold used plastic, so it can be transformed into usable products, such as 3D printing filament. We will use machines already available on the market, as well as build the remainder of the machines using open source blueprints and online resources from preciousplastic.com. This project is designed to be cross-disciplinary, providing raw material to arts and science students for 3D printing, construction projects, and as a sculptural medium. Additionally, the project will generate research opportunities in the fields of material and mechanical engineering, waste management policy, sustainability, industrial design, communications, and business development. For example, Precious Plastic could be utilized as a lab space for faculty and their classes or as culminating projects for students’ theses. In the long-term, sale of recycled plastic filament and finished products can reduce costs for University departments and create a revenue stream to eventually self-fund Precious Plastic operations.

Student Involvement:

Leadership for this project primarily stems from GreenEvans, a UW Registered Student Organization (RSO) from the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance. Graduate students from this program include Emily Coleman, Katy Ricchiuto, and Micah Stanovsky. The undergraduate members of the leadership team include Isabella Castro, Sierra Schonberg, Oliver Kou, Emma Turner, David Frantz, Alishia Orloff, Alexis Neumann, and Mason Clugston. After attending the Autumn 2018 Engineering Kick Off and the Program on the Environment’s Fall Kick Off event, we have received interest from over 100 students to participate in this project. We also plan to attend more on-campus events, such as the 2018 UW Sustainability Fair. We will further work with any students who would like to incorporate Precious Plastic into their capstone projects or major. This allows us to help students who need to develop individual projects while gaining interest and involvement in Precious Plastic. Through the capstone outreach, we will teach undergrad students how to work with others on projects and give them professional experience. As our project moves through its phases, we will reach out to several different disciplines and faculty on campus.

UWPP offers three overarching opportunities for student involvement:

Research & Design
We will engage with students from material and mechanical engineering to build the machines and to develop safe processes for every plastic type we will recycle. With Joyce Cooper as a faculty advisor, John Hamann, a mechanical engineering student, will use UWPP for his senior project, designing the shredder to comply with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC). Additionally, we will work with communications and graphic design students to create messaging and marketing materials to educate students about UWPP. Industrial design students could build products for the machines to create or supporting infrastructure, including specialized collection bins for certain materials. Furthermore, students from the College of Built Environments can do research regarding the collection and impact of UWPP, as well as look at the scalability of our model.

Environmental Policy & Impact
UWPP creates an opportunity for policy students from the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance to discover potential solutions to a national waste crisis. We will also meet with the acting director of the Program on the Environment, Kristi Straus, to find a way to incorporate UWPP into Sustainability Studio, or another one of its sustainability classes.

Product Use & Business Development
For ongoing operations, we foresee bringing in a wide range of students to design and market final products, as well as use the 3D printer filament that we produce. We would like to allow art and industrial design students to create products that we could sell in the University Bookstore. We would also invite students from the Foster School of Business to develop a business plan for the operation with the goal to become a self-sufficient operation in the future. We envision selling the 3D printer filament to students in programs such as art, architecture, medicine, engineering, and dentistry, as well as to student organizations on campus.

 

Education & Outreach:

Our leadership will conduct presentations in undergraduate and graduate classes to raise awareness about the project and increase student involvement. The students can reach out to Precious Plastic through the use of social media (twitter, Instagram and Facebook). We will have our email in the bios for each of the social media outlets allowing anyone who is interested in UWPP to contact us. In addition, we will contact the heads of departments of majors to send out emails to the specific majors that would pertain to Precious Plastic.

The designs for the shredder and the compression machine come from years of R&D from the experiences and improvements provided by the open source community. Improvements made to the shredder and compression machines to meet safety standards will be documented and shared with the broader precious plastic community.

We will be attending several events throughout the school year such as Earth Day, Engineering Kick Off, and Program of Environment Kick off. We will reach out and attend multiple event as we learn about them and will join in. We will also reach out to FIGs, organization, and clubs around the university’s main Seattle campus—such as Comotion—which have expressed an interest in this project. On top of providing guidance in the design and production of 3D printers for student use in general, WOOF3D’s engineering lead, Raymond Guthrie, has agreed to aid in overcoming any extruder/nozzle challenges that may arise in the use of materials beyond PLA for printing filament. At Earth Day 2019, we hope to demonstrate the machines’ capabilities and produce items for the event made from recycled plastic.

Throughout the project, there are opportunities for a homework assignment, extra credit, or for experience for the students. They would come into our location and help us either create the filament, produce the items from the filament or go to learn about the organization. We will also try to work with the RA’s to have competitions between the dorms to see how much can be properly recycled. This allows engagement with the undergrad students as well as an opportunity to spread awareness of UWPP while also spreading knowledge on how to be sustainable and help the environment.

The UW Recycling department supports this project and will assist in the collection of plastics. Collection bins, initially placed in the Mapple Hall undergraduate residences, will feature education materials about the project and the environmental issues with plastic. Outreach efforts will engage faculty for class labs or field trips, and students for thesis projects or other research. We will evaluate our program by tracking the project’s costs, processes, outcomes, and impacts. This data will allow UW to act as a leader within our community and to exemplify innovation by sharing knowledge with other schools and organizations hoping to develop their own small-scale recycling facility.

 

Environmental Impact:
  • Waste
Project Longevity:

FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY & REVENUE PLAN

RSO Status:
Beginning soon after project approval, UW Precious Plastic will apply for RSO status, independent from Green Evans (which current lends RSO sponsorship). This will enable UWPP to apply for funding of events, special projects, and outreach funds.

Saleable Products:
In reference to the Timeline, UWPP intends to prototype and finalize 2 reproducible products by the end of Spring quarter, 2019. Our goal is to engage industrial design, material science, and business students in market research and product design, to ensure there will be demand for our hyper-local, recycled, and student-made goods. These products will be sold at events in the nearby community, bringing in revenue. Stamped with a UWPP logo, they will also amplify our outreach effort through brand recognition and positive consumer identification. We expect to expand this product line to encompass 5-10 reusable items to replace everyday objects, commonly made from virgin plastics, instead made from plastic recycled on campus. This product line, if well-designed and properly targeted, has the potential to create revenue that will support UWPP’s plans for expansion and greater impact.

Environmental Innovation Challenge:
This entrepreneurial competition challenges UW students to innovate new ideas for sustainable products. Whether in the 2018 or 2019 cycles, the UWPP leadership team believes we could submit a strong application. In particular, these funds might apply well to the process of developing products to reduce reliance on plastics within UW departments, detailed in the follow section.

UW Departments:
As the UWPP project gains traction, we also intend to explore the possibility for replacing virgin products commonly used by other UW departments. These may include 3-D Printer filament, UW ID badge slips given to new students, or other products yet to be identified. While this idea hinges on both organization development and product research, there is great potential for both revenue generation, waste reduction, and decreased reliance on virgin plastics campus-wide.

Future Application to CSF:
To pursue the UWPP Vision outlined here, we anticipate that capacity may need to increase to reach longer-term goals of significant and beneficial impact on UW waste streams. We hope to become an integral and sustainable piece of UW Seattle’s entire metabolism. To this end, we may return to CSF with a strong portfolio, proven systems, and achievable next steps toward this vision.

CONTINUED OPERATION PLAN

We also plan on creating a structure for continued operations after the current leadership graduates. By becoming our own RSO in the coming months, we will create a transition plan for leadership and student involvement. We will develop and recruit for formal leadership roles. Our leadership team will leave the UWPP with 10-year maintenance plan, established on- and off-campus partnerships, plastic and design research and prototypes, marketing and communication materials, and operation manuals that include: machine and maintenance training, Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) broken out by the distinct types of plastic, and collection and washing standards.

 

Environmental Problem:

UWPP would result in four impacts on the UW Seattle Campus:

1) Waste Diversion: UWPP will help UW Recycling meet its goal of 70% waste diversion by 2020. We estimate that, when fully operational, we will process approximately 1.5 tons of plastic a year. Our potential location, Maple Hall, generates about 56 tons of garbage a year and 21 tons of recycling a year.  If all of that material at Maple Hall was redirected to this project, it would prevent 1.23 tons of material annual from the garbage.

2) Waste Reduction: Education can lead to behavioral changes. Through our outreach efforts, students can learn about the recycling process. We want to promote the lessons of a closed-loop system and encourage students to live by those principles.

3) Conserving Resources: By using recycled materials in products, UW can reduce its purchasing of and dependence on virgin materials. Specific to our work with campus makerspaces and 3D printing materials, the most common type of printer filament used on campus is PLA (polylactide); PLA is primarily derived from various plant starches and can therefore be commercially composted if treated correctly, however, since “the compost of composters in the USA must be compliant with Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) regulations. PLA is not 100% compostable … if the compost still contains PLA residues, their compost does not meet the OMRI regulation requirements. Therefore, many composters regard PLA as a contaminant” and it remains far more energy- and cost-effective to recycle the material; according to a recent European study, the environmental impact of recycling PLA is over 50 times less than that of composting.

4) Reducing Carbon Emissions and Pollution: Diverting waste reduces the amount of carbon emissions burned transporting this trash to recycling facilities and to landfills. In the most recent IPCC report, research found that petrochemicals, which include plastics, are the third-highest industrial emitter of greenhouse gases, and these emissions will grown by 20% by 2030. Despite the growing impact of UW Recycling programs, UW net greenhouse gas emissions show growth year over year, which, based on societal trends, will only get worse. This project will contribute to reigning in emissions generated by the University.

5) Improving environmental equity: China called our practices of sending our contaminated recycling to other countries, “foreign garbage smuggling.” By not solving our waste issues domestically, we are continuing to place an unfair burden on others. Creating a model for small scale community recycling will allow us to take steps towards environmental justice.

6) Cost Savings Benefits: One aspect of our project will be applying design to mitigate the problems plastic creates. Plastic film has become a recent problem for UW recycling since its removal from the waste stream costs roughly $17.65/hour to $23.51/hour to pay Waste Collector workers to sort. We hope to pose this issue as a design project for students in the Industrial Design program on campus to develop new plastic film receticles to optimize the collection of materials.

 

 

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Throughout the research, development, and initial use stages of the machines, we will develop performance metrics to monitor our success and fulfill CSF’s quarterly reporting requirements. While these data points have yet to be finalized, initial metrics are as follows:

  1. Starting with First Quarter of Operation
    1. Number of students Involved (enrolled, employed, volunteer, service learners)
    2. Number of student hours logged
    3. Number of media mentions (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram)
    4. Number of Class, RSO, and community groups contacted
    5. Number of events and field trips organized (UW campus and off-campus)
    6. Number of events attended and tabled  (UW campus and off-campus)
  2. Starting with Second Quarter of Operation
    1. Number of Machines Running
    2. Number of Products Designed
    3. Processable Types of Plastic
  3. Starting with Third Quarter of Operation
    1. Amount of plastic diverted (in pounds)
    2. Number of Collection Spots on Campus
    3. Amount of 3D filament or other product produced (in pounds)
    4. Amount of CO2 emittance avoided

 

Total amount requested from the CSF: $20,796
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

Due to sit restrictions, we are unable to submit our detailed budget. Please see our supplemental materials for the full budget.
ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal CostNotes
Shredder Materials3,00213002To be constructed from purchased materials.
Compression Molder Materials1,38111381To be constructed from purchased materials.
Extruder389313893Complete machine purchased.
Injection Molder197911979Complete machine purchased.
Product Molds65053250Reusable molds for end-use products.
Wood Chipper1251125For interim use while Shredder is built
Utility Carts1184472
Extruder Cleaning Liquid1810184
Scale50150
Hot Plate2661266
Hot Stamp Machine3751375
Maintenance Costs2004800Quarterly maintenance & repair.
Safety Glasses18118
Heat-Resistant Gloves12560
Respirators275135Half-mask.
PAPR Respirators112122242EH&S Staff indicate that this is the most conservative and safest respirator option.
Lab Aprons17585
Lockout Boxes16580
Collection Tote18590
Storage Shelves1701170
Storage Shelves & Bins1551155
Towels3113124-pack.
Sponges1311324-pack.
Biodegradable dish soap42521010 Gal. total.
Printed Materials & Marketing40041600$400 / quarter for 1 year.
Lockable Document Storage43143
Desk87187

Non-CSF Sources:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal CostNotes
Dabble Lab Membership1009900Cost of 9 annual memberships for UWPP leadership team.
Office Rent600127200Cost comparable to market-rate office space in University District.
Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

UWPP Project Timeline
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
Outreach to students and staffOngoingN/A - Start Date September 2018
Become independent RSO1 monthNovember 2018
Produce safety, operation, and training manuals3 monthsFebruary 2019
Build and acquire machines3 monthsFebruary 2019
Plastic collectionOngoingN/A - Start Date January 2019
Material researchOngoingN/A - Start Date January 2019
Prototype design for marketable products OngoingN/A - Start Date January 2019
First products showcase and interactive demonstration1 dayApril 2019 (Earth Day)
Class visits and demonstrationsOngoingN/A - Start Date May 2019
Begin selling products through the University Book StoreOngoingN/A - Start Date June 2019
Selling 3D Printer FilamentOngoingN/A - Start Date Autumn 2019

Double Dip Conference

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Healthy building certification for the UW Tower – education and demonstration

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Life Sciences Building Rooftop Solar Array - Supplementary

Executive Summary:

UW-Solar has been working with the architects and engineers designing the Life Sciences Building for the last four years. We were part of the proposal, funding, and installation of the Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) fins on the South facade of the building, but have always been aiming to install a larger and more efficient solar panel system on the roof. This proposal is requesting $50,000 to complete the necessary funding for a rooftop solar array on the Life Sciences Building- the new home of UW Biology that was completed this fall. The proposed design is a 100 kW array that would produce an estimated 105,000 kWh/yr, which is equivalent to more than 78 metric tons of CO2e. This system is estimated to cost a total of $300,000, of which $250,000 has already been secured. Therefore, we are requesting the final $50,000 to allow us to fully build-out this system, otherwise we will need to reduce the size to 80 kW. We are hoping the funds for this project come from the new collaboration between CSF and the Student Technology Fee (STF). Producing energy by conventional power plants produces large amounts of greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change. By generating energy on-site using solar energy, this project would decrease the carbon footprint of the Life Sciences Building and the University as a whole. This project would provide three distinct benefits: an economic return to the University, an increase in the sustainability efforts of the campus, and exposing UW-solar students to real-world engineering design and communication with industry professionals. If funded, this project would be the fifth successful rooftop installation designed by UW-Solar, and complete our efforts on the Life Sciences Building. UW-Solar is part of the Urban Infrastructure Lab in the Department of Urban Design & Planning. We are an interdisciplinary student team that work to promote, design, and install solar installation on campus. For more information, visit our website https://blogs.uw.edu/urbanlab/projects/uw-solar/.

Student Involvement:

 

 

Over the three years that this project has been in development, a number of students have been involved. The leadership team for this project has varied between one to five people over this tenure, with Alex Ratcliff as the long-standing project manager.

 

The two students currently leading this project are Shivani Joshi and Alex Ratcliff. Aside from these two, there are more than thirty students actively involved in UW Solar, of which a number have been partially involved in the project when necessary. Shivani and Alex stand as the two principal students during this grant proposal stage, but at least two other students will be brought onto the team during the drafting of the Request for Proposal (RFP).

 

Shivani has recently joined the Life Sciences team and has been helping out in the finalisation of the CSF full proposal which includes revisiting cost and energy performance estimations. She will also be involved in future planning including contractor selection, communication with professional architects and engineers, and interpreting submitted construction documents.

 

Alex has been the project manager for the Life Sciences Building for the last three years. He assisted on the BIPV installation, was the student representative for the Putting the Green in Greenhouse project, and has been working diligently for the installation of a full-sized solar array on the roof. Alex’s primary responsibilities include drafting construction documents, communication with Devin Kleiner, Robert Goff, and other building managers, meeting with UW administrators to discuss the project, and the writing and review of all official documentation.

Education & Outreach:

 

 

The Life Sciences building contains a virtual dashboard that will enable interested students and visitors to experience and learn about how the BIPV panels are helping the building be more energy efficient by following the panels’ energy production. They will also be able to monitor the amount of water that will be recycled by the lab-water recovery system. The dashboard is an interactive system and will be able to engage students and visitors by giving them live updates.

 

The students who are directly involved with UW Solar will be able to experience a real life working environment by being present on the construction site and taking part in the process. Professionals will personally interact with the students and educate them about the detail of the actual installation as well as revise their design and make any appropriate adjustments. One of the scoring guidelines of the RFP will be a “student engagement” proposal that the contractor will be required to submit. Typically, we receive bids that allow students to join walkthroughs of the site, witness the construction of the array, review the construction documents with the project engineer, and participate in the commissioning process.

 

The Life Science building BIPV project will be thoroughly discussed on the UW Solar website as well as being highlighted in the upcoming edition of the Civil and Environmental Engineering newsletter.

Environmental Impact:
  • Energy Use
Project Longevity:

 

 

All of the solar panels, electrical equipment, and metering equipment to be installed will come with warranties to cover malfunctions, deficiencies, failures, etc. that typically span from 10-30 years. Warranties will be included in the specifications of the bids we receive. The lifespan of solar arrays are generally expected to exceed the warranty period; solar arrays can last up to 40-50 years if properly maintained.

 

The array will require scheduled maintenance in the form of yearly cleaning and equipment checks. The details of scheduled maintenance will be outlined in an Operations & Maintenance (O&M) plan submitted by the contractors along with their bid. The long-term maintenance will become the responsibility of UW Facilities and the Building Manager. Unused funds from this project budget will be transferred to UW Facilities to support the long-term maintenance.

Environmental Problem:

 

With this solar installation, we will be reducing the University’s carbon footprint by reducing the amount of CO2 and CO2e produced through conventional energy production. The carbon footprint of the Life Sciences building, due to its lab spaces and large physical footprint, is relatively high. The rooftop photovoltaic panels will help reduce the carbon footprint of the LIfe Sciences building as they will be using solar (renewable) energy in addition to the traditional energy production methods, thus increasing its energy self sufficiency. The rooftop space can accommodate 100kW solar array (approximately 335 standard panels) which will generate 105,000 kWh/year (estimate made using the NREL PVWatt Calculator). This is equivalent to more than 78 metric tons of CO2e, which can be compared to the amount of carbon generated from:

  • 9,000 gallons of gasoline
  • 86,000 pounds of coal
  • 185 barrels of oil

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

The Life Sciences Building has installed a virtual dashboard in the first floor lobby of the building. This dashboard receives information from meters installed throughout the building, and students can interact with the dashboard to see the real-time and historical data of several building metrics including, but not limited to, the energy production from the BIPV panels and the volume of water recycled by the lab-water recovery system. The infrastructure necessary to connect the rooftop system to this system is already in place, and simply requires installing the system. In this way, students will be able to see the measured electrical production of the rooftop system recorded by the system meters. The dashboard will present data on the amount of kWh produced and may have an option to see the equivalent CO2e.

Total amount requested from the CSF: $50,000
This funding request is a: Grant
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

This budget is subject change, and a revised budget will be submitted with bid from our Request for Proposal.
ItemCost Expected Funding Source
Solar Panels$80,000Original CSF Award
Wiring$15,000Original CSF Award
Racking System$10,000This Application
Labor$100,000Donation
Permitting$500This Application
Inverters$50,000Original CSF Award
Metering$7,000This Application
Weather Station$500This Application
Transformer$2,500This Application
IT Equipment$4,000This Application
Comissioning$5,000Original CSF Award
Operations & Maintenance$3,000This Application
Shipping$2,500This Application
Contingency$20,000This Application

Non-CSF Sources:

Previous awards given to this project.
SourceAmountFunding TypeNote
CSF$150,000GrantPreliminary grant awarded to the project in 2017
Undisclosed Donor$100,000DonationDonation given to fund this rooftop project
Project Completion Total: $300,000

Timeline:

Timeline is subject to change and will need coordination with UW Capital Projects & Development and Procurement.
TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date
CSF Proposal Submitted2 weeksOctober 15th, 2018
CSF Award NotificationN/AEarly November, 2018
Communication with CPD and UW Procurement2 monthsEnd of November/Early December, 2018
Request for Proposal (RFP) Drafted & Submitted2 monthsEnd of November/Early December, 2018
Bids ReceivedN/AJanuary/February, 2019
Contractor Selected1 weekFebruary/March, 2019
Array Constructed4 monthsEnd of Summer, 2019

Rebound: The Bounce Back Used Notebooks Deserve

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

HUB Bin Expansion Project

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

Salvage Wood Project Advertising Campaign

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date

Project Approval Forms:

WashPIRG 100% Renewable Energy Plant Potting Event

Executive Summary:

Student Involvement:

Education & Outreach:

Environmental Impact:
Project Longevity:

Environmental Problem:

Explain how the impacts will be measured:

Total amount requested from the CSF:
This funding request is a:
If this is a loan, what is the estimated payback period?:

Budget:

ItemCost per ItemQuantityTotal Cost

Non-CSF Sources:

Project Completion Total:

Timeline:

TaskTimeframeEstimated Completion Date